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New Free OCR Software (Optical Character Recognition)

by @ thefreecountry.com

Another computer program that can capture the text found on an image has been added to the Free OCR Software (Optical Character Recognition) page. This program recognizes a huge number of languages (eg, English, French, German, Japanese, Chinese, Korean, Russian, Spanish and lots more) and can even translate those words to a language of your choice.

Your Ancestors Probably Prepared Meals from These Old American Cookbooks

by Family History Daily @ Family History Daily

By Alexandra Mendez-Diez

Even when we find what we’re looking for in historical archives it can often feel like there is something missing from the results. A big part of why we conduct genealogy research is to get to know those that came before us, and to feel more connected to where we come from. And while learning facts definitely helps us accomplish that, there is only so much connection that can come from names and dates alone.

That’s why it’s so wonderful when we find family history sources that contain some narrative of the actual lives our ancestors lived. However, these sources from the past tend to be few and far between. We can’t all be blessed with the apocryphal box of 150-year old ribbon-tied, hand-written love letters, and even the few of us who receive those sorts of precious gifts will find the box will only tell the story of a couple of individuals from our family tree.

A helpful way of getting to know the day-to-day existence of those who came before is to turn to old cookbooks. When you know the region, time period and demographic reality of a relative from the past, you can extrapolate to determine the sort of cookbook that would apply to the time and place where they lived. And from there, you can experience the very same dishes of food that they once ate. It’s a small window that lets you get to know the ‘meatier’ facets of the lives of your ancestors in a way you can truly sink your teeth into.

The Digital Public Library of America offers a portal of nearly 700 cookbooks filled with old American recipes  – with over 400 of the books with publication dates before 1921. And Hathitrust’s Early American Cookbooks Collection contains more than 1400 selections with dates ranging from 1800-1920. Both places are a great place to start. You might even get lucky enough to find recipes from your own community.

Here is a Selection of 7 Interesting Old American Recipes from Cookbooks in the Collections Mentioned Above

Try cooking up one of these in your own kitchen!

1. Strawberry Macaroon Ice

Slade’s Cooking School Recipes, 1920, combined the recipes of 25 cooking school teachers with a common cookbook conceit: a longform advertisement for a brand of ingredient. In this case, each page includes a little jingle about why Slade’s baking products and spices are superior to all others. Here’s one of the selections from this book. You can see the rest at the link above.

To 1 1/2 cups fresh strawberry juice or syrup from a jar of canned strawberries, add 1/2 cup cold water, the juice of one lemon, a few grains of salt and sugar to taste; turn into a brick mould. Dilute 1/2 pint heavy cream with 1/3 cup milk and beat until stiff. Add 1/3 cup powdered sugar, 2/3 cup macaroons or macaroon drops dried and pounded, 1/2 tablespoon Slade’s Vanilla, and a few grains salt. Pour on to the strawberry mixture to overflow the mould; cover with buttered paper, then with the tin cover. Pack [...]

Ancestry.com’s “Location Traps” Are Causing Researchers to Miss Important Records

by Family History Daily @ Family History Daily

The following article is a free excerpt from a lesson in our Ancestry.com Crash Course. This course is an unofficial guide from Family History Daily. We are not associated with Ancestry except to act as an affiliate partner – which means we may earn a small commission to support the work of our site when if you choose to subscribe to their services from a link on our pages.

While just about all of us have used Ancestry.com at some point, very few have really uncovered everything they can from Ancestry’s massive databases. With so many records and resources it is incredibly easy for vital records to get buried. You might be surprised by how many “brick walls” are broken down and “missing” records located by utilizing a new set of advanced tips and search tricks. Our online course utilizes 21 fun, hands-on lessons to teach you this information quickly and easily. You can sign up for the course at the end of this preview lesson.

Excerpt from Lesson 5: Avoiding Location Search Traps in Your Ancestry.com Searches

If you do not have a current Ancestry.com subscription you can still put this information to use with a free 14 day trial here or by following the instructions in the Ancestry Crash Course for utilizing their free record collections.

Overall, Ancestry does a fairly good job of turning up records – especially when you help it along by utilizing your own skills as much as possible. But Ancestry’s search definitely has some limitations and, in some cases, these can be very detrimental to your research. Most of these limitations are not intentional on Ancestry’s part, instead, they are often a result of Ancestry’s attempt to help researchers along. Ancestry has developed numerous helpers in search forms that generally make our job as researchers easier, but some of them can inadvertently cause major issues if used incorrectly.

One of these helpers can cause so many missed records that we felt it was important to call it out in its own lesson – the location autocomplete.

When we enter information into one of Ancestry’s search forms we often include a location. This information is a vital part of narrowing down our results and helping us locate records that have the greatest likelihood of being relevant to our person in question. You have probably noticed that as you start typing a location into a location box Ancestry begins to autocomplete for you.

This is extremely convenient of course. It helps ensure that we have the name of the location spelled correctly, adds a county to a city search and helps us locate places we may not remember the name of ourselves. It also shows us possible related locations. But the autocomplete can also mislead us and cause us to miss relevant records.

This can happen when we begin a search for a name and lean too much on the autocomplete to find an answer for us, when we use the autocomplete to assume a location without verifying our sources carefully, or when we are not cautious [...]

Why Your Ads Should Look 100 Years Old

by Today's Industry Insider @ The Kissmetrics Marketing Blog

Think ‘lead magnet’ ads are new-age? Think again. Free opt-in ad campaigns like that have been around for almost a century. Everyone’s looking for the hot new thing. A watch that counts your steps, takes notes, answers your calls, and oh yeah, also tells time. An iPhone that has a new update every time you […]

SearchCap: Google Search Console beta invites, Google attribution & question and answers in maps

by Barry Schwartz @ SearchCap: Daily Search Engine News Recap

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: Google Search Console beta invites, Google attribution & question and answers in maps appeared first on Search Engine Land.

What you need to know about the Research Excellence Framework open access policy

What you need to know about the Research Excellence Framework open access policy

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

The UK education funding councils’ post-2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) open access policy came into effect in April. Mafalda Marques, project officer (PASTEUR4OA), Jisc, talks through the key requirements and the support available to institutions to help them comply.

For more information on the policy visit the original blog post.

To subscribe to the Jisc podcast, go to iTunes, or add the RSS feed to your favourite podcast app.

File search engine added

by admin @ Deep Web Search – A How-To Site

Was shown a nice search engine for embedded, zipped, or otherwise obscured files. www.findthatfile.com Looks in FTP, zip, RAR and other formats. Also added the National Security Archive http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/search.html

4 Events That Changed Our Ancestors’ Lives Forever, and the Records They Left Behind

by Family History Daily @ Family History Daily

By Tony Bandy

When it comes to history and genealogy, the two topics can never be separate. Our ancestors’ daily lives, family connections, and records were influenced by events in history that they could not control – and the aftermath of these historic events often brought about quite a change for those affected.

Let’s take a look at some of the events that may have influenced your American family members over the years as well as some related free resources for researching them. From the 1918 Flu Pandemic to the law that changed US immigration forever, these important historic happenings are worth investigating as part of your family history journey.

4 Historic Events That Changed America (and Maybe Your Ancestors’ Lives) Forever

1. Homestead Act of 1862 and the Opening of the American West Post Civil War

Westward expansion of the United States provoked many changes as families in the Eastern seaboard and states to the immediate west of them pulled up stakes and headed out.

This movement has its origins in the Homestead Act of 1862, which provided around 160 acres of land to person(s) who could stay and improve the property for a minimum of five years. From a genealogical standpoint, if you know your family moved west in the latter part of the 19th century or later, more than likely the Homestead Act (and other similar land acts) might have played a part.

To better understand how this important act may have influenced your family and to discover records for researching them please read:

Millions of Homestead Act (and Other) Land Records Are Free Online from the BLM

Were Your Ancestors American Pioneers? Here’s How to Track Them Down Online

2. The 1875 Supreme Court Decision in Henderson vs. Mayor of the City of New York

In 1875 the Supreme Court decision, Henderson vs. Mayor of the City of New York, transferred control of immigration from the States to the Federal Government for the first time.

The aftermath brought about the U.S. Government’s first standardized program for immigration, which helped bring about the immigration centers – such as Castle Garden, Ellis Island and Angel Island – that handled the mass immigration we saw in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Use the articles below to discover how to find your immigrant ancestors online for free.

Did Your Ancestors Come Through Ellis Island? Here’s How to Find Out

The 11 Million Free Immigration Records You May Have Completely Overlooked

Millions of Immigrants Never Set Foot on Ellis Island – Find Their Records Here

Fascinating Interactive Map Shows Immigration to the US from 1830 Onwards

3. 1918 Flu Pandemic

While these days the thought of a massive influenza outbreak is usually far from our minds, the 1918 Flu Pandemic was very real to our ancestors. Claiming more lives than WW1, this pandemic swept through more than 500 million people, nearly a third of the world’s population at the time, and killed between 20-50 million. Family History Daily writer Susan Wallin Mosey discusses this in her article More Died [...]

The world’s leading cloud providers on working together at Jisc Horizon Scan think tank

The world’s leading cloud providers on working together at Jisc Horizon Scan think tank

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

The Future of Cloud Computing think tank, part of Jisc’s Horizon Scan project, was held at London’s Digital Catapult Centre. The event saw CIOs and IT directors from UK education and research institutions sit down for wide-ranging discussions with the biggest names in cloud computing including Google, Microsoft, Amazon and Atos. In this podcast, discover how Jisc is playing an important role in finding solutions to contractual and technological challenges and opening the door wider to this transformational technology. 

AMAZON IS PLANNING TO BECOME A LOCAL SERVICE DIRECTORY FOR HOME REPAIR

by submit @ Submit Express

Amazon is planning to become a local service directory for Home Repair ,a little like Angie’s List and Craiglists, but on Amazon you can actually purchase the service, similar to Groupon. An article by our CEO Pierre Zarokian has been published on Search Engine Journal, which explains more. It is titled: “Will Amazon Become the […]

Ixquick and StartPage: Privacy review | ExpressVPN Blog

Ixquick and StartPage: Privacy review | ExpressVPN Blog


Home of internet privacy

If you're into privacy, you'll love these private search engines who DON'T track your every move. Read on for reviews of Ixquick, StartPage and DuckDuckGo.

Free Image Pop-Up JavaScripts (Where Image Overlays Current Web Page)

by @ thefreecountry.com

I'm sure you have seen sites where if you click a thumbnail, a bigger version of the image pops up overlaying the current web page. Now you can implement this on your own website with these free image pop-up JavaScripts.

Top 10 Search Engines In The World

Top 10 Search Engines In The World


reliablesoft.net

Which are the 10 best and most popular search engines in the World? Besides Google and Bing there are other search engines that many not be so well known but still serve millions of search queries per day. It may be a shocking surprise for many people but Google is not the only search engine available today on the Internet! In fact, there are a number of search engines that try to take Google's throne but none of them is ready (yet) to even pose a threat. Nevertheless, there are search engines that are worth considering and the top 10 are

SearchCap: AdWords AMP landing pages, Google & Apple tracking & SEO mistakes

by Barry Schwartz @ SearchCap: Daily Search Engine News Recap

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: AdWords AMP landing pages, Google & Apple tracking & SEO mistakes appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Why we should all be interested in international research programmes

Why we should all be interested in international research programmes

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

Richard French tells us how Jisc is supporting UK researchers and universities in their international research and collaboration. Read his original blog here.

Can HistoryLines Really Build an Instant Personal History of Your Ancestors?

by Family History Daily @ Family History Daily

By Jodi Bash

The HistoryLines website bills itself as “Instant Personal History.” Those of us who love family history get really excited when we think we can get a lot of valuable information quick and easy. So at first glance HistoryLines can seem a little disappointing. Instant personal history may be overselling it. But, like any good tool, the more you put into it the more you get out. And on second glance, HistoryLines is a good tool.

How HistoryLines Works and What it Costs

Please note that we may receive a commission to support our work if you decide to use the discount coupon provided on this page. All opinions in this article are that of the author, who has written an honest review of what HistoryLines has to offer.

To get a sense of what this program can do for your family history you can create a free account in HistoryLines.com and start a story by plugging in the names, pertinent dates and locations for a few ancestors. But, in reality, the free version does not provide much value since you only get 2 free stories. To create any more you will need a paid account and once you start personalizing it, you’ll want more than two stories. If you do have a paid version it is also a very simple task to upload a GEDCOM file of your tree. It is the fastest way to get the most data imported into HistoryLines; and easy to add to once it’s there.

If you try the free version and would like to subscribe you can pay monthly for $9.95 or you can subscribe for a year for $59.95. HistoryLines has provided a coupon for Family History Daily readers so you can get 30% off of either option by using code FHD30P. You can find the subscription options here.

No matter which route you choose – once you enter in some details about your ancestors you are delivered back a timeline of what happened historically within the life of that ancestor. For each story you will see a timeline of US events, a map of where that person lived, events by states they resided in, and a report providing a description for each event as well as descriptions of broader categories surrounding your ancestors life. An average size report for my grandparent was over 20 pages.

For example, in my grandmother Betty’s life, which ranged from 1919-2009, you can read generically about Iowa during the time she was born, the Scopes Monkey Trial of 1925, and the New Deal Years among other events. You can also read about trends in clothing, diet, religion, medicine, and other general categories throughout Betty’s life.

Timeline and map. The red dots on the map are where Betty lived. If I click my mouse on those, the program will list the historical events that occurred while my ancestor lived there.

The image above shows the generic history, made slightly more personal by using my ancestors name and age in each descriptor.

This report can be printed in [...]

Top tips for making your digital resources easier to discover

Top tips for making your digital resources easier to discover

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

Within many further and higher education institutions there exists a wide-ranging group of libraries, archives and collections. The digitisation of their assets for the purposes of teaching, learning and research is a sophisticated activity. But digitisation is only the first step, with the effective delivery of those assets being the second. Matt Faber, digital media adviser at Jisc give us his top tips for making your resources discoverable.

Read his original blog here.

Were Your Ancestors Affected by Disaster? This Site Will Help You Uncover Their Stories

by Family History Daily @ Family History Daily

By Alexandra Mendez-Diez

Family History is about more than just finding the names and important dates of those that came before us, it is a quest to discover the narratives of our ancestors lives. But finding that information can be difficult and sometimes requires creative solutions, such as reviewing old newspapers or examining historical events that affected large populations.

That’s why a unique website like GenDisasters.com is such an invaluable free resource. GenDisasters provides a database of tragic events, primarily via transcribed entries, many of which are taken from newspapers. The entries include lists of who was involved, killed or injured in the event.

What makes the site most valuable to genealogical researchers is that you can search the events by the names of those who were involved, as well as browse the disasters by parameters that are ideal for conducting genealogical research: location, event and time period.

Let’s take a closer look at how to use the site most effectively, and see what sort of stories our sample searches might yield.

Searching By Name on GenDisasters

Certainly, the most straightforward method is to search by name. This is accomplished by using the search box in the upper right of the screen.

Be aware that there may be advertisements on the free page that also look like search bars, but instead will take you to “public records searches” from companies that are completely unaffiliated with genealogical searches. So long as you stick with the search bar pictured in the image, you’ll be fine.

Once there, insert any names you’ve encountered from your own family tree, or even the names of people who are connected to your family, and see if you get any matches with these names in the records of disasters. You can browse through the search results, quickly eliminating many results that do not fit because of the time period or location.

A couple of things to consider as you conduct name searches is how important it is to include variations. Remember that a majority of these records are taken directly from newspapers, and they use different naming conventions than legal records, like birth and death certificates do.

You may be accustomed to entering a relatives’ full legal name (first, middle, last) into a search as that will often provide you with the most relevant results, but that can be counterproductive in a search that depends on newspapers for a source. Oftentimes anything besides a person’s last name may be shortened to a person’s initials. In older newspapers, married women are most often referred to as just by their husband’s name.

Not just the last name, but the first name as well. So a woman named Janet Leonora Lee who married Abe Robin Palmer might be called Mrs. A. R. Palmer, Mrs. Palmer, Mrs. Abe R. Palmer or Mrs. Abe Palmer, but rarely would any of her other names be mentioned unless they were directly relevant to the news story at hand. That’s why it is important to include the full names of husbands (including variations) of relatives, even if the spouse [...]

New Open Source Programmer's Editor / Plain Text Editor

by @ thefreecountry.com

A new text editor has been added to the Free Programmer's Editors and Plain Text Editors page. This one runs on Windows, Mac OS X and Linux and is open source.

New Free Encryption Software Libraries: add encryption to your programs without needing to be an expert

by @ thefreecountry.com

Two cryptographic software libraries have been added to the Free Encryption / Cryptographic Libraries and Source Code page. If you are writing software for the Internet, or any other type of software, these libraries allow you to add encryption support for your program without being a cryptographic security expert. (In fact, they assume by default that you aren't an expert, and so have appropriate options selected by default. You can of course override them if you wish.)

New Free Screen Recorder and Capture Software: record your own screencasts or take screenshots

by @ thefreecountry.com

A new open source program for Windows has been added to the Free Screen Video Recorders and Screen Capture Software page. This one is a Windows program that can do video recordings of the screen (along with audio from a microphone or speaker) and webcam, as well as take screenshots.

SearchCap: Amp links at large, Google AdWords demographic targeting & more

by Amy Gesenhues @ SearchCap: Daily Search Engine News Recap

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: Amp links at large, Google AdWords demographic targeting & more appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Free Reputation Management Webinar

by submit @ Submit Express

Our CEO Pierre Zarokian and attorney Aaron Minc from Dinn, Hochman & Potter, LLC will be doing a free online webinar on July 19, 2016 at 2:30pm EST. Pierre Zarokian will discuss Yelp and general reputation management, including: – The importance of Yelp and why you should actively try to increase your positive reviews on Yelp – […]

New Bayesian Software added

by admin @ Deep Web Search – A How-To Site

For those who want to do some forecasting of high uncertainty events, we’ve added a new page for software. Free software, too. Bayesian Software

New site added for OSInt video

by admin @ Deep Web Search – A How-To Site

While researching on the current massive meteorite strike in Russia this morning, one deep web resource has shown how useful it is for extracting out videos for local OSInt. http://www.liveleak.com It is being added to the deep web list

new academic aggregation engine

by admin @ Deep Web Search – A How-To Site

Added http://www.scirus.com  for academic search docs, pointed out to me by a user and a military hardware site http://semanticommunity.info

Search for Cruelty-Free Companies, Products, and More | PETA

Search for Cruelty-Free Companies, Products, and More | PETA


PETA

There are thousands of cruelty-free companies in our database, including The Body Shop, Tom's of Maine, wet n wild, and many more!

Jisc at altc2015 - view from day one

Jisc at altc2015 - view from day one

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

8 - 10 September marks the return of the annual Association of Learning Technology (ALT) conference, which brings together practitioners, researchers and policymakers from across the sector to share their research and experiences.

Paul Bailey, senior co-design manager, speaks to us about the first day, reflecting on Jisc sessions about the Summer of Student Innovation and learning analytics, as well as what he's looking forward to seeing.

Visit the Jisc website for more information.

Research data spring: extending the organisational profile document to cover research data management

Research data spring: extending the organisational profile document to cover research data management

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

Over the past few months we've been conducting interviews with projects in research data spring, to find out more about their work, progress to date, and how they've found the process so far.

We also want to find out about the people behind the ideas and get to know them and their aspirations.

In this podcast we speak to Joy Davidson from the Digital Curation Centre about a project to improve how institutions support research data management.

Visit the Jisc website to find out more.

250,000 Rode America’s Orphan Trains: Were Your Ancestors Among Them?

by Family History Daily @ Family History Daily

Thank you to Barbara Lockard for this article. 

From The Robinson Argus, February 17, 1886, Robinson, Illinois:  A company of children, mostly boys, aged from seven to fifteen years from the New York Juvenile Asylum, will arrive in Robinson at the Robinson House, Thursday morning, March 4, 1886. Homes are wanted for them with families where they will receive kind treatment and enjoy fair advantages. They are mostly of respectable parentage, promising and desirable, and worthy of good homes. They may be taken on trial for several weeks, and afterwards, if all parties are suited they will be indentured until of age. Persons desiring to take these children on trial are requested to meet them at the Robinson House, Thursday morning, March 4. They will remain only one day. For further information inquire at your Post Office for a handbill giving full particulars. E. Wright, Agent

My husband’s grandfather was an Orphan Train child. I often have visions of this grubby little urchin rambling through the streets of New York City. I envision him scrounging through the garbage for a morsel of food, huddling in a corner to keep warm and getting into a fight over a penny.

My grandfather-in-law was left to roam the streets of Manhattan because he supposedly was the product of alcoholic parents. Long before coming of age, he was thrust into the mainstream of society. He was only nine years old!

Many articles have been written about the Orphan Train Children, and much research has been conducted through the efforts of the National Orphan Train Complex. It is the central clearing-house established to preserve the history of approximately 250,000 children placed out between the early 1850s and 1929.

In 1859 Charles Loring Brace, founder of the Children’s Aid Society, stated, “The best method of disposing of our pauper and vagrant children is emigration to the West. The children of the poor are not essentially different from the rich, the same principles which influence the good or evil development of every child in comfortable circumstances will affect in greater or less degree the child of poverty.” (OTHS Newsletter)

I doubt my husband’s great grandparents were paupers because the father was a cooper, a very desirable trade of the era. Yet their son became a vagrant due to their lifestyle. I can just imagine his elation upon being plucked from the streets. He was housed with a warm bed, hot food and clean clothes. His every need was met; unlike that which he had experienced in his natural home.

An announcement in The Ottawa Free Trader (Ottawa, Illinois) 14 Jun 1873

For twenty years I have pursued every lead, read every article printed and contacted the Orphan Train Heritage Society in regard to gleaning more information about the waif in question. Two major organizations, The Children’s Aid Society and The New York Foundling Hospital, were responsible for placing these children on the trains that took them to the rural areas of the West to find new homes. My personal research finally took a turn when I [...]

Net neutrality is important, and we need to fight for it

by Lexie @ Home of internet privacy

Net neutrality (before 2003, described as common carrier concept) is an important principle of internet regulation. Despite being regarded as a cornerstone of successful innovation in an open and free internet, the principle of net neutrality is under threat from Internet Service Providers (ISPs), large corporations, and governments. What does net neutrality mean? Net neutrality […]

The post Net neutrality is important, and we need to fight for it appeared first on Home of internet privacy.

You Make Your Own “Luck” in Genealogy Research

by Family History Daily @ Family History Daily

Thank you to Bob Vornlocker for this article on his German genealogy research. 

In the following article Bob has shared a personal story of breaking down a long-time brick wall and the process he used to create that “lucky break” for himself. He discusses using wildcards, the importance of accessing original records, his experience working with professional on-site genealogists, how common it is to confuse people of the same name when looking for ancestors and, most importantly, the determination and creativity required to solve complex family history questions that may otherwise appear to be permanent “brick walls.”

Bob also wrote “How to Use Wildcards to Find Your Ancestors” for Family History Daily in the past. You can read that article here for help with using wildcard searches.

Please note that Bob has made available all records mentioned in this article for your review here. We have included a couple of them below.

For the past 3 years, I’ve been teaching once a month at my local library about how and where to search for ancestors. Although most of the lessons focus on the Internet using search techniques like wildcards, every session includes a mention of the importance of evidence in building a family tree. So often, people are satisfied by a record of a marriage in an index and cite that as proof of the marriage. They do not even bother to obtain a copy of the marriage record, although the information to do so is often included in the index information.

In 2009, I was searching for information about my father’s grandparents, both of whom had emigrated from Germany to the USA in the late 1800s. All I knew was that his name was John and hers was Theresa. While searching online for sites with German databases I discovered the German Genealogy Group in New York. Their database manager was so far advanced for the time as to allow wildcards in the search fields.

Of all the churches in New York City, my great-grandparents chose to be married in St. Leonard’s Roman Catholic Church in Manhattan, one of a few churches indexed by the GGG. I searched for V*rnl*r, which I used after finding several other badly misspelled ancestors, and found John Vornloker marrying Theresia Pfister on 11/7/1886.

I also found a record for the baptism of their son, John, very near the date of my grandfather’s birth. I entreated the president of the GGG, Liz Lovaglio, to look at the record for any additional information. She kindly did so and sent me the following:

Date of Marriage: 7-Nov 1886

Groom: John Vornloker

Place of origin: Burg Eberach Bavaria

Father’s Name: Peter

Mother’s Name: Regina Mueller

Bride: Theresia Pfister

Place of origin: Herrpoldsheim Baden

Father: Sebastian

Mother: No name in records

Witness 1: Joseph Klimmer

Witness 2: George Metzner

Priest: John Joseph Raber

I spent some time deciding that his birthplace might be Burgebrach, Bavaria, Germany and quickly wrote to the Archiv des Erzbiztums Bamberg (Archives of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Bamberg). I employed an excellent archivist, Carolin Ott, who confirmed a Johann Vornlocker, with a father named [...]

SearchCap: Yelp hits Google again, link building & SMX East preview

by Barry Schwartz @ SearchCap: Daily Search Engine News Recap

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: Yelp hits Google again, link building & SMX East preview appeared first on Search Engine Land.

New Free Mathematics / Numerical Library: exploits multi-core CPUs and GPUs to speed up computation

by @ thefreecountry.com

A dense linear algebra programming library that can fully exploit the power of multi-core CPUs and GPUs has been added to the Free Numerical, Mathematical, Statistics Libraries and Source Code page.

Research data spring: software reuse, repurposing and reproducibility

Research data spring: software reuse, repurposing and reproducibility

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

Throughout the summer at Jisc we’ve been conducting interviews with various projects that are part of the research data spring, to find out more about their work, their backgrounds, and how they’ve found the process.

In this series of interviews, we take the time to dig a little deeper into the thinking behind these projects, and get to know a little more about the work, and the people, behind them.

Ian Gent from the University of St Andrews and Catherine Jones from the Science and Technology Facilities Council fill us in on three Rs, but not as you might know them from school – theirs is a project about software reuse, repurposing and reproducibility.

Are senior IT staff taking a strategic role?

Are senior IT staff taking a strategic role?

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

Richard French, international coordinator at Jisc is attending the Educause annual conference in the US. Educause is the association for higher education IT professionals in the US and their conference is one of the largest EdTech events in the world. Following research undertaken last year which found that IT manager were not always involved in leadership decisions, where their skills and knowledge could benefit their institution. Richard talks to attendees to find out how much progress has been made in getting IT professional a seat at the management table.

SearchCap: Google iOS app trends, difficult clients & content SEO

by Barry Schwartz @ SearchCap: Daily Search Engine News Recap

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: Google iOS app trends, difficult clients & content SEO appeared first on Search Engine Land.

The 7 Best Search Engines for Finding Free Images — SitePoint

The 7 Best Search Engines for Finding Free Images — SitePoint


SitePoint

Yahoo! estimates we'll take 880 billion digital photos in 2014 -- the challenge is finding the right image. Ada looks at your best search options.

New Free Make Utility: automate the building of your computer programs

by @ thefreecountry.com

Another open source tool has been added to the Free Make Utilities page. For those not sure what "make" in this context means, it refers to a type of software used by programmers to automate the process of building a computer program from its source files.

Google Discontinues “Instant Search”

by hothadmin @ The HOTH

Google recently announced it’s doing away with Google Instant, which was created in 2010. Only 7 years after its inception, the search feature is proving obsolete. But what exactly does this mean for Google users? And for the realm of search engines in general? Let’s take a look. What Is Google Instant? Google Instant was […]

The post Google Discontinues “Instant Search” appeared first on The HOTH.

Hear about the new AWS agreement removing data egress uncertainty for researchers

Hear about the new AWS agreement removing data egress uncertainty for researchers

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

In a landmark move for research, AWS is waiving data egress charges for qualified researchers and academics in moving data out of the cloud - making it easier for the sector to use cloud services by offering more predictability in costs. The agreement has been reached through ongoing discussions with Jisc in the UK, GÉANT in Europe, and DLT in the United States. 

At Digifest16, we spoke with Brendan Bouffler, scientific computing manager at AWS, about how the agreement will benefit researchers.

For more podcasts like this, visit the Jisc website or sign up via iTunes.

Two New Open Source Clipboard Managers: copy/paste multiple things without losing older clips

by @ thefreecountry.com

Two open source programs have been added to the Free Clipboard Managers and Extenders page. Such software are especially useful to programmers and webmasters who may cut/copy and paste a lot of text (and other things like images, filenames, HTML, etc) between different windows. They allow you to paste something you copied some time ago, and that you may have already overwritten in the default clipboard.

New Free and Open Source Media Player (plays DVDs/Blu Rays too)

by @ thefreecountry.com

Another free computer program has been added to the Free Media Player, Free DVD / Blu Ray Players page. Like the others listed there, it handles a large number of media formats, in addition to DVDs and Blu Rays.

New Free Accounting Software

by @ thefreecountry.com

Are you setting up your own business (online or otherwise)? Then you probably need an accounting software to keep track of your finances. Check out the Free Financial Accounting Software page, where a new program has just been added.

New Free File Storage and Sharing Host: this one is from Mozilla

by @ thefreecountry.com

Another host has been added to the Free File Storage Hosting site. This one is from Mozilla and it allows you to upload a file of up to 1 GB in size for download by one person within 24 hours. I have no idea how long this service will last though. Nearly all the services I previously listed on the page have long disappeared. (Free file storage hosts seem to have a half-life measured in months, if even that.)

How can we create user-led solutions for better research?

How can we create user-led solutions for better research?

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

Researchers continuously have to make decisions around preserving their data, the best way to describe it, and who will have the long-term oversight. Daniela Duca looks into ways that we can create user-led solutions for better research.

 

Like this podcast? Subscribe via iTunes or add the RSS feed to your favourite podcast app. You can also visit the Jisc website for more content

SearchCap: Google AdWords ad suggestions, ad performance & Doodles

by Barry Schwartz @ SearchCap: Daily Search Engine News Recap

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: Google AdWords ad suggestions, ad performance & Doodles appeared first on Search Engine Land.

10 Free Genealogy Apps to Help You With Your Research

by Family History Daily @ Family History Daily

By Alexandra Mendez-Diez

Technology has done a lot to make conducting our genealogical searches easier. There’s the obvious boon of increased access to nearly limitless resources, but there are a great many other ways in which technology can aid our research – from organizing what we find to digitizing and storing copies of photos. And one of the best parts is that we aren’t limited to using those tools only when we’re sitting at home, not with so many free genealogy apps on the market.

Whether you want untethered access to resources while you’re conducting in-person research, when you’re sorting through hard copies of documents in an archive, or you simply want to use the time you’re waiting in line for coffee to keep looking for your ancestors these 10 genealogy apps are a great choice.

10 of Our Favorite Free Genealogy Apps to Make Your Research Easier

When you embark on the journey to map out your family’s history it’s not just research that is important. Once you acquire research you’ll also need to organize it. Digital photos have only come into being very recently, but they are far and away the easiest way to store copies of anything you’d like to maintain a full visual record of. And while our ancestors have come from all over the world, passing down their genes to us, their language was often not included in our cultural inheritance. But, luckily, with translation software this is no longer the barrier it once was.

For these reasons, we’ve broken down this list of genealogy apps into categories based on the tasks most relevant to conducting genealogical research – family trees and research, organization, digitization and translation.

Family Trees and Research

The heart of any genealogy research is the searching and recording of our family’s data and there are several great genealogy apps that are completely free that will help you look from wherever you happen to be.

1. FamilySearch Family Tree

This app is available for both iPhone and Android. It receives high ratings in reviews with a 4.8 in the Apple Store and 4.3 on Google Play. Created by FamilySearch, this app offers a range of resources for searching, mapping and organizing your family tree. It’s worth noting that new information that you upload or add to your tree will be made public so that other people can use it for their own research, but information about the living can be kept confidential.

2. Find A Grave

Available for iPhone and Android. Offering access to 120 million graves in half a million cemeteries, this app lets you virtually tour cemeteries looking for the graves of ancestors. What makes the mobile option so great is that because so much of the information is crowdsourced it lets you easily upload any information you might find in your own visit to grave sites.

3. Dolphin

Chances are you spend a good deal of time on your phone in the browser app, but if I had to guess, most of you are using the default browser with your phone, such as Safari or Chrome. [...]

Search Engines

Search Engines


Support

This support page covers why your blog might not be in Google, how to include your blog in — or remove your blog from — Google search results after changing your privacy settings, and meta tags and…

AI science search engines expand their reach

AI science search engines expand their reach


Nature News & Comment

Semantic Scholar triples in size and Microsoft Academic's relaunch impresses researchers.

The Conversion Rate Conundrum: Common Mistakes and What to Do Instead

by Today's Industry Insider @ The Kissmetrics Marketing Blog

In real estate, the axiom is location, location, location. It’s first and foremost. The number one consideration. For your digital efforts – email, web pages, eCommerce platforms – an argument could be made for a few different ones: search engine optimization (SEO), the user experience (UX), conversion rate optimization (CRO), or perhaps something else entirely. […]

Search Engine Vectors, Photos and PSD files | Free Download

Search Engine Vectors, Photos and PSD files | Free Download


Freepik

More than a million free vectors, PSD, photos and free icons. Exclusive freebies and all graphic resources that you need for your projects

100 Search Engines For Academic Research

100 Search Engines For Academic Research


TeachThought

100 Search Engines For Academic Research

New open source TV PVR software: record TV shows and even stream them

by @ thefreecountry.com

A free and open source program has been added to the Free TV PVR (Personal Video Recorder) and TV Recording Software page. This one handles a wide variety of inputs (DVB-C/C2/T/T2/S/S2, ATSC, ISDB-T, IPTV, SAT>IP, etc), supports EPG (Electronic Programme Guide), and can also serve as a TV streaming server. For those who are not sure what I just said because of the heavy jargon, the software essentially lets you record TV shows, and can also send those shows to other devices in your home.

AMP and Ranking 0 are Becoming More Important

by John E Lincoln @ Ignite Visibility

This week: You can now edit local business info in search results, Instagram is testing canvas ads, and wait until you hear about how many of the top results don’t get clicks.   Here’s what happened this week in digital marketing. DemandJump Cloud Tool Shows Where Your Traffic Came From A new DemandJump tool, just...

The post AMP and Ranking 0 are Becoming More Important appeared first on Ignite Visibility.

24 Most Effective Free SEO Tools for Google, Bing & More | Buffer Blog

24 Most Effective Free SEO Tools for Google, Bing & More | Buffer Blog


Social

Check out our list of the best free SEO tools that can boost your organic rankings on Google & Bing and can lead to immediate gains in your marketing today:

That’s so blasé: A quick guide on how NOT to expose other people’s privacy online

by Brad @ Home of internet privacy

Whether it’s your old high school friend sharing your Facebook details to level up on Candy Crush or someone willingly forking over their email contacts so they can get a free month of Tidal, there’s a certain I-don’t-care attitude when it comes to sharing info online. While most apps simply use this information to market […]

The post That’s so blasé: A quick guide on how NOT to expose other people’s privacy online appeared first on Home of internet privacy.

Aberystwyth University share their digital storytelling experiences

Aberystwyth University share their digital storytelling experiences

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

One of the ways that Jisc supports its members is by offering training and consultancy that empowers them to embed best practice across their organisation. Aberystwyth University is an example of an organisation that has recieved our advice and guidance, and been able to disseminate their learnings further, to excellent effect. 

Following a 'train the trainer' session on digital storytelling with subject specialist, Chris Thomson, the university's e-learning group has delivered its own session for teaching staff. This has inspired attendees to develop innovative teaching activities using digital storytelling, with the help of CADARN Learning Portal, which provided the WeVideo platform for video editing. We hear from Mary Jacobs, e-learning advisor, and Stephen Chapman, teaching fellow and researcher about how they've embraced digital storytelling whole-heartedly.

For more information you can visit the university's guide on digital storytelling.

Like this podcast? You can subscribe via iTunes or add the RSS feed to your favourite podcast app. Visit the Jisc website for more stories.

New Open Source Real-Time Web Analytics Software

by @ thefreecountry.com

A new web analytics package has been added to the Free Web Statistics and Web Log Analyzers page. This open source software, consisting of JavaScript and PHP scripts, provide a wide plethora of statistics on your visitors in real time. If you don't want Google Analytics or any of the other remote-hosted web statistics services because of privacy concerns, you may want to check this one out since it's installed on your own web server.

Recognising digital innovation in research and education

Recognising digital innovation in research and education

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

The 2016 Times Higher Education (THE) Awards on 24 November 2016 saw the sector come together to recognise innovation from institutions across the UK, showcasing the best of higher education.

Dr Daniel Morgan, Associate Professor: Igneous Petrology & Volcanology; talks to us about the winning project, Virtual Landscape. Then Martin Hamilton, Jisc's resident Futurist, discusses the judging process.

Like this podcast? Subscribe via iTunes or add the RSS feed to your favourite podcast app. You can also visit the Jisc website for more content.

Censorship is free speech when search engines do it, a US court just ruled

Censorship is free speech when search engines do it, a US court just ruled


Quartz

A US District Court judge dismissed a lawsuit March 27 that accused Chinese search engine Baidu of illegally suppressing free speech by censoring information about democracy movements in China on the internet. The decision raises some unsettling questions about the world's dependency on a handful of search engines. The group of activists who brought the suit said...

SearchCap: Google local business edits, AMP powered featured snippets & Bing Ads bid adjustments

by Barry Schwartz @ SearchCap: Daily Search Engine News Recap

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: Google local business edits, AMP powered featured snippets & Bing Ads bid adjustments appeared first on Search Engine Land.

SearchCap: SEO content audits, a search marketer’s view of Facebook & a link study

by Amy Gesenhues @ SearchCap: Daily Search Engine News Recap

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: SEO content audits, a search marketer’s view of Facebook & a link study appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Free Google Search Engine Rankings Checker Tool

Free Google Search Engine Rankings Checker Tool


The HOTH

The HOTH Search Engine Ranking Tool helps you identify high volume keywords for your domain.

Project Owl, and Google’s Attempt to Hit Fake News Where it Hurts

by submit @ Submit Express

Google’s got a big problem, and it’s the same one that’s plaguing Facebook. How do you deal with fake news, when the truth is evolving in real time? A new update from the search engine, codenamed “Project Owl”, aims to try and curb the fake news epidemic. It’s also making some interesting changes to search, […]

New Free Antivirus from Kaspersky

by @ thefreecountry.com

The new free version of Kaspersky Antivirus has been added to the Free Antivirus Software page.

John Lincoln of Ignite Visibility Nominated for Search Marketer of The Year (Press Release)

by John E Lincoln @ Ignite Visibility

Ignite Visibility Press Release The following is a press release. JOHN LINCOLN OF IGNITE VISIBILITY NOMINATED FOR SEARCH MARKETER OF THE YEAR BY SEARCH ENGINE LAND The internationally recognized Landy Awards honor the best in digital marketing San Diego, CA, September 19, 2017 – Search Engine Land, the leading search marketing industry publication, recently included...

The post John Lincoln of Ignite Visibility Nominated for Search Marketer of The Year (Press Release) appeared first on Ignite Visibility.

SEO: The Beginner's Guide to Search Engine Optimization from Moz

SEO: The Beginner's Guide to Search Engine Optimization from Moz


Moz

New to SEO? Need to polish up your knowledge? The Beginner's Guide to SEO has been read over 3 million times and provides the information you need to get on the road to professional quality SEO.

SearchCap: Google EU appeal, goodbye fetch as Google for apps & award list

by Barry Schwartz @ SearchCap: Daily Search Engine News Recap

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: Google EU appeal, goodbye fetch as Google for apps & award list appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Jisc at altc2015: view from day two

Jisc at altc2015: view from day two

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

8 - 10 September 2015 marks the return of the annual Association of Learning Technology (ALT) conference, which brings together practitioners, researchers and policymakers from across the sector to share their research and experience.

James Clay, project manager at Jisc, tells us what happened on day 2 at ALT-C and talks us through the session on digital capabilities.

 

What Is SEO / Search Engine Optimization?

What Is SEO / Search Engine Optimization?


Search Engine Land

Get started learning all about SEO from the industry's most trusted source, Search Engine Land. Review basics of search engine optimization, ranking factors & more.

Five Best People-Search Engines

Five Best People-Search Engines


Lifehacker

Need to do a little online detective work? Track down anyone from long lost schoolmates to the new friend whose number you've lost with this assortment of powerful people-search engines. Photo by Byrne7214.

Long Tail Keywords, Simple Steps To Drive Notable Revenue

by John E Lincoln @ Ignite Visibility

If you’re looking for a new way to generate web traffic but you haven’t yet tried to optimize your content for long-tail keywords, then now’s the time. In fact, you can do your brand (and your bottom line) a lot of good by writing articles centered around detailed search terms that your competitors don’t know...

The post Long Tail Keywords, Simple Steps To Drive Notable Revenue appeared first on Ignite Visibility.

How Do Search Engines Make Money Even If It's Free?

How Do Search Engines Make Money Even If It's Free?


Economy Secrets

There are quite a lot of Search Engines these days. And their number keep raising. Is "search engine" a good business? How do search engines make money?

New Open Source Programmer's Editor from Microsoft

by @ thefreecountry.com

Another source code editor has been added to the Free Programmer's Editors, Integrated Development Environment (IDE) and Plain Text Editors. This one is an open source program from Microsoft.

Ripoff Report Removed from Google for Several Hours, What Happened?

by submit @ Submit Express

Written by Pierre Zarokian We stumbled across something quite amazing this morning: RipOffReport appeared to have been completely de-indexed by Google for several hours. We can confirm that at 11 AM pacific standard time, performing a search for “site:ripoffreport.com” or the Ripoff Report brand name returned no results. Although the site has since shown up […]

The Best Free Usenet Trials Of 2017

by Grey One @ GreyCoder

So you'd like to try Usenet before you buy? Well here's a few reliable providers that offer free trials so you can test their service:

The post The Best Free Usenet Trials Of 2017 appeared first on GreyCoder.

Findsmarter.com added

by admin @ Deep Web Search – A How-To Site

http://www.findsmarter.com nifty multi-search tool that lets you group answers by topic or domain extention (ie. – .edu or .gov)

New Free/Open Source Atari Emulator

by @ thefreecountry.com

Another Atari ST emulator has been added to the Free Atari Emulators page. This one is open source and comes with ROMs for Atari 520ST and 1040ST. For those wondering, an Atari emulator is a computer program that mimics the old Atari computers sold in the 1980s and 1990s, and can run software written for those machines on your modern computer.

Research data spring: automatically presevering research data

Research data spring: automatically presevering research data

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

Throughout the summer at Jisc we’ve been conducting interviews with various projects that are part of the research data spring, to find out more about their work, their backgrounds, and how they’ve found the process.

In this series of interviews, we take the time to dig a little deeper into the thinking behind these projects, and get to know a little more about the work, and the people, behind them.

Jenny Mitcham, from the University of York and Chris Awre, from the University of Hull talk about their work with Archivematica and others to develop software that will automatically save research data and help fill what they call the ‘preservation gap’.

 

Research data spring: creating open source plug-ins for journal publishing

Research data spring: creating open source plug-ins for journal publishing

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

Throughout the summe at Jisc we’ve been conducting interviews with various projects that are part of the research data spring, to find out more about their work, their backgrounds, and how they’ve found the process. 

In this series of interviews, we take the time to dig a little deeper into the thinking behind these projects, and get to know a little more about the work, and the people, behind them. 

Ernesto Priego, from City University London and Andy Byers, from Ubiquity Press, talk about their work to create a series of plug-ins for open source publishing software called Open Journal Systems. These plug-ins will allow authors to publish data and articles directly from a journal managment system to insitutional repositories. This will reduce costs and save time for researchers.

 

Ten search engines for researchers that go beyond Google

Ten search engines for researchers that go beyond Google


Jisc

Using search engines effectively is now a key skill for researchers, but could more be done to equip young researchers with the tools they need. Here, Dr Neil Jacobs and Rachel Bruce from Jisc’s digital infrastructure team share their top ten resources for researchers from across the web.

How To Submit A Site To Search Engines Like Google, Bing & Yahoo - Hobo

How To Submit A Site To Search Engines Like Google, Bing & Yahoo - Hobo


Hobo

Step by step tips on how to submit your website to all major search engines in 2017. Based on my 15 years experience.

Hear from Jisc's customers

Hear from Jisc's customers

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

On 26 Jan 2016 Jisc welcomed customers to their annual stakeholder forum. Hear what their customers thought of their recent work with education and research providers and what their current concerns are for the coming year.

These 2.5 Million Records May Be Genealogy’s Best Kept Secret

by Family History Daily @ Family History Daily

This sponsored article has been provided by our partner Findmypast.

Findmypast is a leading online destination for family historians, with millions of records that you simply can’t find anywhere else. It’s also the only place online that you can access the Periodical Source Index (PERSI), an incredible resource that you may be completely unaware of.

PERSI is an index of millions of articles, how-to guides, genealogies, local histories and more that have appeared in society publications from around the world. Both family history and history societies publish regular periodicals for their members and have done for generations. These publications cover the area or subject specific to that society, and go into incredible detail – some of which may well contain information about your family.

You might find the detailed history of one family, a biography of a local figure, a history of peach-pickers in a certain area or details about early colonial communities and where they came from. There is a vast amount of information in PERSI just waiting to be discovered. You’ll find records from the USA, the UK and Ireland, Australia, Canada and more.

Articles fall under twenty-two different subject headings, or record types, dating back to 1800. These include biography, cemeteries, census records, church records, court records, deeds, institutional records, land records, maps, military records, naturalization records, obituaries, passenger lists, probate records, school records, tax records, vital records, voter records, and wills. Articles about three or fewer specific families are arranged by surname.

Available exclusively at Findmypast, and operated in partnership with the Allen County Public Library, PERSI contains 2.5 million images that allow you to read these publications online.

Here’s How to Use PERSI for Your Research

In order to begin using PERSI, click here. Exclusively for Family History Daily readers; you’ll get 50% off a one month Premium subscription using the code FHDPER50. For just $9.98, you can start uncovering the gems hidden in the Periodical Source Index today. This offer is only valid until Aug 30th.

When searching PERSI, it’s important to remember that the articles are indexed with tags that are based on the subject of the article. Unlike other record sets, PERSI articles are not indexed by name. This means that unless someone wrote an article about a specific ancestor of yours you are unlikely to find them by searching by name. Your best approach to searching is by location and keyword.

You will have to think laterally about the search you’re conducting. If you’re looking for ancestors who you know were agricultural laborers in a specific county during the 1870s, or were early nonconformists in Yarmouth, then these are the subject areas you’d search for.

Filtering Your PERSI Search

If the above sounds daunting, don’t worry. We have a set of search filters that can help you to drill down to what you’re looking for. On the left of the screen, you’ll see a range of filter options.

Clicking on the ‘show filters’ button will give you a list of the available filters for that category, in this case we’ve selected [...]

Research Data Spring: project update -  giving researchers credit for their data

Research Data Spring: project update - giving researchers credit for their data

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

In this series of podcasts hear from our Research Data Spring teams who are developing technical tools, software and service solutions to support research data management. This podcast is from Fiona Murphy who tells us about a project looking at to give researcher credit for their data.

Research Data Spring: project update - building an integrated Research Data Management System

Research Data Spring: project update - building an integrated Research Data Management System

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

Throughout the summer, we’ve been conducting interviews with various projects that are part of the Research Data Spring, to find out more about their work, their backgrounds, and how they’ve found the process. In this series of interviews, we take the time to dig a little deeper into the thinking behind these projects, and get to know a little more about the work, and the people, behind them. Alisa Miller speaks about her project – and neologism – a consortial approach to building an integrated Research Data Management System.

New Open Source Mac Emulator: run old Mac games and software on Windows

by @ thefreecountry.com

Feeling nostalgic? An open source emulator for the old Macintosh 128K, Macintosh 512k, Macintosh 512ke, Macintosh Plus, Macintosh SE and Macintosh Classic has been added to the Free 68k and PowerPC Macintosh Emulators page.

Open science: many hands make light work

Open science: many hands make light work

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

Open science has been highlighted as one of the priorities of the Dutch presidency of the European Union in 2016. Matthew Dovey, head of research technology at Jisc, discusses the motivations behind the open science movement and why initiatives to support it are more important than ever. Read his original blog here.

The Best Free VPN Trials Of 2017

by Grey One @ GreyCoder

I’ve made a list of the best free VPN trial I could find. Note that I’ve only included reliable VPN providers that I recommend. Apparently, PureVPN and VyprVPN offer free trials, but make it difficult to get your money back, so you may want to avoid those services. ExpressVPN ExpressVPN has a 30 day “no quibble” money-back offer. They provide ...

The post The Best Free VPN Trials Of 2017 appeared first on GreyCoder.

Free Genealogy Search Engine: Research Hundreds of Sites

Free Genealogy Search Engine: Research Hundreds of Sites


Family History Daily

This free genealogy search engine allows you to check hundreds of free family history sites for your ancestors at one time. Find vital records and much more.

What are the Best Free NZB Search Engines for Usenet?

What are the Best Free NZB Search Engines for Usenet?


Comparitech

Our favorite free NZB search engines (AKA NZB indexers) are NZB.is, Binsearch, and NZBIndex. NZB indexes are used to find files or parts of files on Usenet.

Beating Brexit: why we must build more bridges towards borderless education

Beating Brexit: why we must build more bridges towards borderless education

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

Overseas’ students are a key part of the UK economy, but Brexit is already having an effect on the numbers from the EU who want to study here. To ensure the UK remains a world leader in delivering education and research internationally we must now capitalise on developing opportunities for “borderless” study

In this podcast we take a look at why we must build more bridges towards borderless education.

Like this podcast? Subscribe via iTunes or add the RSS feed to your favourite podcast app. You can also visit the Jisc website for more content.

Chan Zuckerberg Initiative acquires and will free up science search engine Meta

Chan Zuckerberg Initiative acquires and will free up science search engine Meta


TechCrunch

Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan's $45 billion philanthropy organization is making its first acquisition in order to make it easier for scientists to..

New Open Source SSH Client: access your website's computer directly

by @ thefreecountry.com

A new SSH program has been added to the Free SSH (Secure Shell) and Telnet Clients page. For those not familiar with such things, SSH clients allow webmasters to access the computer where their websites are hosted through a command line window, as though they are seated directly at that computer. They are often used to perform various administrative tasks that are otherwise difficult (or impossible) to do.

How To Add Local Schema Markup To Your Website

by hothadmin @ The HOTH

Schema markup is code that you can use to markup certain elements of your website to help search engines understand them better. By adding local schema markup to your website, you can tell search engines exactly what your business name is, your image, your address, phone number, hours of operation and more. In today’s article, […]

The post How To Add Local Schema Markup To Your Website appeared first on The HOTH.

New Free JavaScript Date Picker: Add a pop-up calendar to your date input fields to allow users to select a date

by @ thefreecountry.com

Two new scripts have been added to the Free JavaScript Calendar and Date Picker Scripts page. They allow you to add a date picker to your web forms, where users can click a date field and select a date from a calendar that pops up.

University of Stirling upgrades its network connection

University of Stirling upgrades its network connection

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

The University of Stirling has recently upgraded its internet connectivity, taking an additional connection to the Janet network and becoming a Janet Point of Presence. This has increased the university’s capabilities and resilience, supporting its business strategy and improving teaching, learning and research.

Kathy McCabe, university librarian and director of information services, tells us about what they’ve done and how they’re benefitting.

Find out more about the Janet network on Jisc's website. For more podcasts from Jisc subscribe via iTunes or sign up for the RSS feed.

Research data spring: project to change the way researchers use metadata

Research data spring: project to change the way researchers use metadata

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

Throughout the summer at Jisc we’ve been conducting interviews with various projects that are part of the research data spring, to find out more about their work, their backgrounds, and how they’ve found the process. 

In this series of interviews, we take the time to dig a little deeper into the thinking behind these projects, and get to know a little more about the work, and the people, behind them. 

Simon Coles, associate professor at the University of Southampton, is helping to develop a project called CREAM (collaboration for research enhancement by active metadata). It looks at changing and improving the way researchers use metadata, which is data that summarises basic information about data. It can make finding and working with data easier for researchers.

Getty – New Book deep web asset listed

by admin @ Deep Web Search – A How-To Site

We’ve added Getty, they have part of their collection online. Getty Research Institute – http://www.getty.edu/research/library/ – The Getty Research Institute library collections include over one million books, periodicals, study photographs, and auction catalogs as well as extensive special collections of rare […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry...

26 Free Search Engine Optimization Classes (From an Expert) - Ignite Visibility

26 Free Search Engine Optimization Classes (From an Expert) - Ignite Visibility


Ignite Visibility

How would you like to learn search engine optimization (SEO) from a pro? Better yet, how’d you like to learn about in a virtual classroom setting.

Veteran Search Marketing Expert Pierre Zarokian to Speak at Pubcon

by submit @ Submit Express

The world of reputation management is one that isn’t well-defined, and Yelp is one of the primary platforms that businesses are concerned with. Bad Yelp reviews, according to Harvard, have real impact on how consumers perceive a business. Pierre Zarokian, a veteran in the realm of search marketing and the CEO of Submit Express and […]

Jisc at altc2015: view from day three

Jisc at altc2015: view from day three

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

8 - 10 September 2015 marks the return of the annual Association of Learning Technology conference (ALT-C), which brings together practitioners, researchers and policy makers from across the sector to share their research and experience. 

 

Sarah Knight, senior co-design manager at Jisc, introduces us to her session at ALT-C which looked at how universities and colleges are working in partnership with their students.

Six free SEO tools to boost your search engine rankings | VerticalResponse

Six free SEO tools to boost your search engine rankings | VerticalResponse


Vertical Response Blog

Being found by the search engines is as important as being found by the right customer. Discover a list of free SEO tools to improve your search visibility.

Free JavaScript Minifiers (Minimizers), Obfuscators and Compressors

by @ thefreecountry.com

This new page lists free tools that can shrink the size of your JavaScript code (sometimes referred to as "minify") as well as some that can obfuscate it (that is, make it hard to understand). They may be useful if you want to improve the responsiveness of your website or perhaps obscure your JavaScript from a casual inspection.

This May Be the Most Important Genealogy Research Trick You’ll Ever Learn

by Family History Daily @ Family History Daily

The first thing most family history researchers do when they encounter a genealogy website is to begin searching for their ancestors in the general (main) search form provided by the site - which is often located on the homepage or in another easily accessible area. All large genealogy research sites center around these main search forms which are designed, generally, to look for records in all searchable collections at one time. General search forms that dig through millions, or even billions, of records are certainly handy. If you have never used a site before - or have not searched for a specific ancestor - these forms can be a great way to gather the low hanging family history fruit, so to speak. They provide a fast way to turn up easy-to-find records with little effort. But, despite this obvious convenience, they may often be stifling your efforts.

The role of the independent developer in edtech

The role of the independent developer in edtech

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

Pat, who develops bespoke digital solutions for educators and researchers through his company Pgogy Webstuff, shares his thoughts on how social media has affected edtech development and explains the contributions independent developers are making across the sector.

New Free File Synchronization Software: back up your data and keep your backup up-to-date

by @ thefreecountry.com

A new computer program has been added to the Free File Synchronization Software page. Such tools allow you to back up your files and folders to another location and keep the data in sync. This latest addition not only supports backing up to the usual hardware devices (like hard disks, USB drives, CD/DVD media) but also to FTP servers and over the local area network.

The future of data-driven decision-making

The future of data-driven decision-making

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

How do we move to a data-led culture in UK research and education? In this podcast, hear about the second in a series of reports due to emerge from our horizon scanning project.

Co-design 2016: the intelligent campus

Co-design 2016: the intelligent campus

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

In this podcast James Clay and Andy McGregor discuss the concept of the intelligent campus. There has been plenty of hype over artificial intelligence and the internet of things - we believe it may be time to put aside the cynicism that this kind of hype generates and look seriously at how we can take advantage of these emerging technologies to improve the student experience, research and the management of our campuses.

 

Find out more at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/rd/get-involved/what-does-the-imminent-arrival-of-the-intelligent-campus-mean-for-universities-and-colleges

3 Reasons Your AdWords Traffic Is Not Qualified

by Today's Industry Insider @ The Kissmetrics Marketing Blog

AdWords is one of the most predictable paid media channels. By using it, you’re focusing on people who show their intent in advertising platforms. Search traffic is growing by a lot. In 2014, marketers spent $23.44 billion in the search channel. That same figure for this year is already $32.32 billion, and it’s expected to […]

SUBMIT EXPRESS CEO PIERRE ZAROKIAN DISCUSSES CONTROVERSIAL YELP CASE

by Gevorg @ Submit Express

Imagine that your business is receiving phone calls from Yelp, unsolicited, trying to sell advertising space. How many times do you have to say “no thank you” until you finally reach the end of your patience? One business wants “no” to mean “no” in every aspect. In a recent interview with Search Engine Journal, Pierre […]

The Best NZB Search Engines For 2017 - GreyCoder

The Best NZB Search Engines For 2017 - GreyCoder


GreyCoder

I survey the best NZB search engines for 2015.

Google Alternatives: Top 10 Best Free Search Engines Other than Google

Google Alternatives: Top 10 Best Free Search Engines Other than Google


TechReviewPro

Google Alternatives? Why do need a search engine other than Google? There may be multiple reasons for it. Check out these top 10 best Google alternatives.

August SEO Deal: Boost The Power Of Your Links

by hothadmin @ The HOTH

Hey, Do you want to know how to double the value of your backlinks – for FREE? This month we’re unleashing our huge Boost Your Links special where you can get a free HOTH Boost with any HOTH Platinum or HOTH Guest Post purchase! By boosting your links you can double the value of them […]

The post August SEO Deal: Boost The Power Of Your Links appeared first on The HOTH.

New Free Game Engine: create your own Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, Android and iOS (iPhone) games

by @ thefreecountry.com

Another game engine has been added to the Free Games Engines (Games Programming Libraries) page. It lets you build games for Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, Android and iOS (ie, iPhones). You can even create web-based (ie HTML5) games with it for users to play on your own website.

New Free File Comparison (ie Diff) Software

by @ thefreecountry.com

A new program has been added to the Free File Comparison Utilities page. Such software typically display the differences between two text files so that you can see, at a glance, what has changed between them, and some can also merge the changes. (Note that the page also lists a tool that can compare two binary files and create a patch to update one to the other; useful for programmers wanting to distribute small updates to their software.)

100% FREE Search Engine Marketing Course & Certification

100% FREE Search Engine Marketing Course & Certification


eMarketing Institute

Get a 100% FREE search engine marketing course, FREE ebook & FREE certification. Get certified today at eMarketing Institute | www.emarketinginstitute.org

SearchCap: Bing fact checking, Google mobile tips & Bing agency awards

by Barry Schwartz @ SearchCap: Daily Search Engine News Recap

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: Bing fact checking, Google mobile tips & Bing agency awards appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Networkshop44: learn, share and be inspired

Networkshop44: learn, share and be inspired

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

Network managers and technical system and security specialists from the UK research and education community are invited to join us at Networkshop44 which takes place between 22-24 March at the University of Manchester. Jill, who has attended the event more than a dozen time, tells us it’s the perfect opportunity to share experiences and learn about the latest developments.

Free Royalty-Free Stock Photos: new site added with photos of scenery and people

by @ thefreecountry.com

Another source of free pictures has been added to the Free Royalty-Free Stock Photos page. This one has both scenery and people photos which are released under the Creative Commons Zero licence, which means that they may be used for any purpose without attribution or payment, even on a public website that you created.

Slideshare.net added to engines

by admin @ Deep Web Search – A How-To Site

A good place to find slides and buried corporate info is on slideshare.net www.slideshare.net Added to deep web search engines.

Research data spring: gathering data as artists go through creative process

Research data spring: gathering data as artists go through creative process

by web@jisc.ac.uk (Jisc) @ The Jisc Podcast

Throughout the summer at Jisc we’ve been conducting interviews with various projects that are part of the research data spring, to find out more about their work, their backgrounds, and how they’ve found the process. 

In this series of interviews, we take the time to dig a little deeper into the thinking behind these projects, and get to know a little more about the work, and the people, behind them. 

Thanasis Velios, reader in digital documentation, tells us about his project to create software to automatically gather data as artists go about the creative process - Artivity.

Dystopian data: How my search history cost me my job

by Gus @ Home of internet privacy

The following is part of a fictitious series that looks at the dangers of internet privacy abuse. ExpressVPN delves into a dark, but very realistic future where ISPs routinely sell your private data to the highest bidder. January 14th, 2019: Interview day. I was nervous; I hadn’t had a job interview in years. “Hope the […]

The post Dystopian data: How my search history cost me my job appeared first on Home of internet privacy.

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