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Podcasting for Business: Why Marketers Are Betting on Podcasts

Podcasting for Business: Why Marketers Are Betting on Podcasts

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Have you considered starting a podcast? Would you like to discover how to use a podcast to grow your business? To explore why marketers are placing big bets on podcasting, I interview Jay Baer and Joe Pulizzi. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Jay Baer and Joe Pulizzi. Jay is the host of the Social Pros podcast and Jay Today. He's also the man behind MarketingPodcasts.com. His company is Convince & Convert. Joe podcasts at This Old Marketing and Content Inc. He's the founder of the Content Marketing Institute and the man behind the Content Marketing World conference. Jay, Joe and I explore how podcasting has evolved since we all started. You'll discover how podcasting can help your business, how to work with sponsors and more. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. How to subscribe/review on iPhone. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Podcasting for Business Why Joe and Jay started podcasts Joe, who has been podcasting since November 2013, explains how encouragement and research led him to start a podcast. His company did a gap analysis to find out the biggest difference in tactics between the most and least effective marketing professionals. Two tactics—books and podcasts—are the factors that made the difference. He noticed the audio version of his book Epic Content Marketing really took off, so he figured there must be something to audio. Joe shares how his and Robert Rose's podcast evolved. Joe recalls how once after their weekly phone call about what was going on in content marketing, he said, "We should have recorded that." Robert asked, "Why don't we?" They launched This Old Marketing the following week. Jay started podcasting in January 2012, and just finished the third season of his Social Pros podcast, which totals about 150 episodes. Jay explains that Tristin Handy, who was director of marketing at Argyle Social at the time, said, "Did you ever think about doing a podcast? We should do a podcast." And Jay thought, "No and okay." They got together and decided to create a show that paid attention to the unsung heroes of social media. Jay says it's grown far beyond the expectations he had for it at the beginning. Listen to the show to discover which podcasts I listened to when I started the Social Media Marketing podcast. How podcasting helps their businesses When Joe looked at the behaviors of those who attend Content Marketing World, he realized his core customers engage in at least three different content vehicles, such as the newsletter, magazine and/or webinars. It's the third thing that's the tipping point, so he figured the audio content could be what gets people to the event. Jay says the Social Pros podcast allows them to spotlight their corporate clients, as well as interview potential future clients. Podcasting has become a strong lead-generation business strategy. It's also helped Jay from a personal branding and awareness perspective, because it positions him (and his company) as a leader in the field. Listen to the show to hear how podcasting builds customer loyalty. Their new ventures Joe's releasing a new book called Content Inc., which will be out in time for Content Marketing World in September. Rather than just doing a book, he's creating a platform. "If it's important enough to be a book, it's important enough to be a bigger media property," Joe explains. "You can launch an entire platform off of a podcast." The Content Inc. podcasts are 7-10 minutes long, and reuse and repurpose his other content. Jay recently launched Jay Today,

Failing to Start: Why We Accept Mediocrity and How to Change

Failing to Start: Why We Accept Mediocrity and How to Change

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you accept your lot in life? Are you afraid of starting something new? To learn how to accept who we are and how to make a change, I interview Seth Godin for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Seth Godin, the bestselling author of Purple Cow, Tribes, Linchpin and many others. His most recent book is The Icarus Deception. He's also the CEO of Squidoo. Seth shares his experiences of having an idea and going for it, even if you think it might fail. You'll learn why he thinks everyone should be willing to fail and why art is so important. You'll also discover how Seth used Kickstarter to fund The Icarus Deception. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Taking Risks The idea behind The Icarus Deception The idea behind The Icarus Deception was Seth's manifesto rant that will hopefully shine some light on the revolution that he thinks we are living with right now. Seth explains how people don't understand the impact of the Industrial Revolution of 1880–1910. Before 1880, there was no such thing as jobs. The unemployment rate was zero and most people worked on the land or for their family business. The Industrial Revolution changed this and it also changed government, regulations, school, culture and society. It invented the weekend. We accept all this because it happened before we were born. You'll discover why right now we have a new revolution that is replacing the fading industrial age. What's happening now is that we have a revolution built with the connection we have about ideas, people to people and the ability to reach markets. We'd have never thought back then that one person working by him- or herself anywhere in the world with a laptop could touch a million or a billion people. Seth talks about how PSY, who made the Gangnam Style video in South Korea, was viewed 900 million times and how this was impossible 15 years ago. When Seth wrote Permission Marketing 12 years ago, he didn't realize that he was writing about a different way to make connections with people. He believes that it isn't about Facebook or Twitter, it's about a passion for doing things that might not work. The industrial age is about polishing things so they do work. It's the giant gap. Seth wants to teach people to like the idea of doing something that might not work. Listen to the show to find out more about why it's connections that create all of the value in business. Why the commonly told version of the Icarus story is no longer relevant Seth believes that all myths are true, to the extent that although there are no supernatural beings involved, they're about us. Myths have developed over thousands of years to talk to human beings about how to be our best selves. The myth involves Icarus and his father Daedalus stranded on an island. Daedalus fashions some wings for his son and says, "Put these on, but don't fly too high because if you do, the sun will melt the wax and you will die. But more importantly, don't fly too low because the mist in the water will get in your wings and you will surely perish." Seth explains the reason why the industrialists want us to fly too low is because they benefit from this. Listen to the show to find out why Seth thinks we are flying too low and what he wants us to do about it. The meaning of art Seth shares his definition of art. Art is the work of a human being doing something that has never been done before,

5 of the Best Minimalist Blogging WordPress Themes

by Darius Carrick @ MOJO Marketplace Blog

Looking for the best minimalist blogging WordPress themes? These themes from Premium Coding hit the mark and are available for a variety of purposes.

The post 5 of the Best Minimalist Blogging WordPress Themes appeared first on MOJO Marketplace Blog.

Bad SEO Advice You Should Still Avoid

by Michael Martinez @ SEO Theory

I should create a “Bad SEO Advice” category and collect all the articles I have written about it through the years in one place.  There are days when I am tempted to go back and “update” old articles about bad…

5 Ways to Use Fan Content to Improve Your ROI

5 Ways to Use Fan Content to Improve Your ROI

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want to increase the ROI for your social media campaigns? Have you considered fan content? Using fan photos in your marketing is an effective way to highlight your brand, products and customers at the same time. In this article you'll discover five ways to drive ROI with user-generated content campaigns on social media. Listen to this article: Why User-Generated Content Campaigns? With the proliferation of online channels in addition to those of traditional marketing, you're in a constant battle for your audience's attention. Rather than rely solely on your creative team to produce content, consider turning to your customers. Putting in the time and effort to develop customer relationships typically means that your social media program will consume a large share of your marketing budget. For this reason, you may be asked to justify spending by providing concrete social media ROI. It's true that it's difficult to measure the business value of a like or a shared post, but you can successfully run social marketing campaigns and see real returns for your efforts. Take a look at how these five brands have launched and managed user-generated content campaigns across Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. #1: Turn Fans Into Product Models Charlotte Russe ran an exceptional social media marketing campaign to showcase the #CharlotteLook (how influencers were styling their clothes). Instagram users were asked to upload their favorite Charlotte look and use the campaign hashtag in their posts. The company selected the most on-brand user-generated content from the campaign and displayed it on their homepage. Charlotte Russe linked each winning photo to the product pages of the items that were featured in the photo. This tactic resulted in viewers who engaged with the customer photos being 28 times more likely to end up on a Charlotte Russe product page. #2: Reward Your Fans 6 Pack Fitness launched their #LeadThePack campaign with a weekly bag giveaway. They asked users to submit a photo for a chance be featured on the website and win a bag of their choice. 6 Pack Fitness's social media marketing strategy included displaying the best customer photos featuring their bags on the company's product pages. The company saw an immediate impact on their ecommerce performance. Customers who interacted with one of the customer photos on their product pages were 2.7 times more likely to make a purchase and had 12% larger order sizes. #3: Build on Local Pride The Breckenridge Colorado Tourism Office ran a successful social media campaign that asked: Why do you love Breckenridge? Fans were asked to share their thoughts on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. Under the tagline #BreckBecause, fans formed an online community that showcased the authentic Breckenridge experience. As a result of this campaign, GoBreck.com increased web traffic from social media by 841% and increased Instagram followers by 93%. #4: Celebrate Customer Stories Ahnu has a customer base of active adventurers who wear their shoes. The brand launched its #Ahnu campaign to collect photos of cool things their fans were doing and interesting places they were visiting. The company displayed #Ahnu campaign submissions on their Facebook page, and viewers could vote on their favorite content. The users who engaged with these customer photos were 12 times more likely to end up on the Ahnu website. #5: Tap Into Customer Lifestyles California Natural Products wanted to increase brand awareness about their Svelte protein shakes on social media. Under the hashtag #DrinkSvelte, they asked fans to post photos of themselves and their Svelte drinks. The best photos were displayed on the Svelte website, and the photos generated more than 2 million impressions online. How to Leverage Your Own User-Generated Content The brands featured in this article went above and beyond just collecting content.

Google Posts: How to Use Google’s New Feature for Local SEO

by Alicia Zeluff @ Pure Visibility

Do you feel like you don’t stand out when it comes to local search? Are you looking for an easy way connect with your regional audience? If so, Google’s new Google Posts feature may be a great way for you to increase engagement through your Knowledge Graph and Google Maps listing, without sinking a lot of time and money into the effort.

The post Google Posts: How to Use Google’s New Feature for Local SEO appeared first on Pure Visibility.

5 Lesser Known Facebook Page Features for Marketers

5 Lesser Known Facebook Page Features for Marketers

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you manage a Facebook page for your business? Interested in ways to improve your marketing? In addition to the Facebook features you use for business every day, there are some handy ones you may have overlooked. In this article you'll discover five lesser known Facebook Page features for marketers. Listen to this article: #1: Free Images for Ads When creating a Facebook ad, you can choose from a searchable database of thousands of free stock images from within the Facebook image library. This takes an extra step out of the ad creation process. This image library is powered by Shutterstock, but there's one important caveat: Not all of the images meet Facebook's advertising guidelines. For this reason, it's important to familiarize yourself with the guidelines and choose your images carefully. You don't want your ads getting rejected over some minor technicality such as the 20% text rule on ad images. #2: Ad Relevance Scores The ad relevance score is basically Facebook's answer to Google's quality score for AdWords. The relevance score guides how often your Facebook ad will be displayed and how much you'll pay for each ad engagement. Facebook considers a lot of different factors when calculating your relevance score, including positive and negative feedback via video views, clicks, comments, likes and other ad interactions. If people report your ad or tell Facebook they don't want to see it anymore, those actions count against you. Keeping an eye on your ad relevance score can help you determine if your ad needs work. Oddly enough, this setting is unchecked by default. To enable ad relevance scoring, open the ad or ad set in your Ads Manager and navigate to Customize Columns. From the list of available columns, find and select the Relevance Score check box. Enabling this option adds a Relevance Score column to your ads reports so you can keep an eye on this metric. #3: Email Contact Import A great way to grow your audience is to invite the people in your email address book to like your Facebook business page. To do that, go to your Facebook business page, click on the ellipsis (…) button (next to the Share button on your cover image) and then select Invite Email Contacts from the drop-down menu. Next, you see a pop-up box that lists all of the different integration options you can use to import your contacts. Identify the contact list you want to import and click the Invite Contacts link to the right. After you upload your list, a dialog box appears where you can select which contacts to invite. You have the option to select individual contacts or the group as a whole. After you select your contacts, click Preview Invitation. On the next page, review the invitation, select the check box that you're authorized to send invitations and click Send. There are a couple of points to keep in mind when sending invitations. You can upload up to 5,000 contacts per day, so if you have large customer or subscriber lists, you'll have to send invitations in batches. Remember, your page may already be suggested to your contacts who use Facebook, so you can decide whether to email them as well. If you're already showing up in their recommended pages, it's just free advertising for you. #4: Facebook Post Scheduling The ability to schedule Facebook posts is pretty handy, especially if you're using promoted posts. The good news is that you don't need Hootsuite or Buffer to do it. You can schedule future posts right in Facebook. You can even backdate posts so that they appear earlier in your timeline. To access this feature, go the Publishing Tools tab, select Scheduled Posts and click the Create button. Compose your post and then select Schedule from the Publish drop-down menu. Select the date and time to schedule your post. When you're finished, click Schedule. Scheduling posts can be especially useful for larger teams where you have different ...

Facebook Marketing for Small Business: What You Need to Know

Facebook Marketing for Small Business: What You Need to Know

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Is your business on Facebook? Are you wondering how a small business can benefit from Facebook marketing? To learn about the opportunities for small businesses, I interview Ramon Ray for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Ramon Ray, the author of The Facebook Guide to Small Business Marketing. He's also the founder of Small Biz Technology and the guy behind a great event called Small Business Summit. Ramon shares his tips and techniques when it comes to Facebook marketing. You'll learn how to grow a larger following on Facebook and turn Facebook engagement into sales. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Marketing The marketing opportunity for small businesses When it comes to business, although Facebook is a great networking tool, Ramon believes that the most important thing any small business should do is start with a website and focus on email marketing. Facebook is the biggest social network out there and it's where your prospects, customers, friends and family are. Not only will Facebook help you find specific people, it also allows you to target these people. Ramon explains how Facebook having access to so much rich information makes it very simple for them to approach you and ask whom you want to advertise to. They are able to narrow it down. With Facebook, you can do this with a good degree of granularity, which works well for many people. Listen to the show to find out how marketing has changed from 10 years ago and how it's a lot more economical now. Some ways to grow a larger following for small business owners on Facebook Ramon lists three things that small businesses should do to grow a larger following on Facebook. Be consistent with your posting Be relevant Be excited about it Remember people aren't necessarily on Facebook to buy, per se. They're there to have fun. Many small business owners on Facebook don't realize the interconnectedness among people. You'll hear an example of how interaction can lead to more of your fans being drawn to your Facebook Page. Ramon believes that there is no other platform that allows you to create deeper engagement than Facebook does. When it comes to advertising a post, there are so many different ways to do it. Small business owners use Facebook as an engagement platform. Listen to the show to find out how Facebook can help you connect not only to individuals but their networks as well. How Facebook groups differ from LinkedIn groups Ramon states that although LinkedIn has some big, powerful groups, he believes the advantage that Facebook has goes back to friends of friends. This is where Facebook might have the edge. For example, with regards to LinkedIn groups, marketers talk about how to build the group and how you get the LinkedIn alerts. However, when you create a group on Facebook, you can make it private or public. In Ramon's opinion, what's nice is that overall, you are still operating in the realm of Facebook. The main differentiator when deciding whether to create a Facebook group or a LinkedIn group is, "What is your audience using?" When it comes to Facebook groups, you have to keep in mind that some are public and some are private. And Facebook has a very powerful search feature. Ramon talks about the rules of engagement for Facebook groups when it comes to business owners looking for opportunities. Don't dive in there and start selling your products.

How to Make Sure Your LinkedIn Account Is Secure

How to Make Sure Your LinkedIn Account Is Secure

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you on LinkedIn? Have you reviewed your security and privacy settings recently? While LinkedIn is valuable for building your professional presence, it's important to be conscious of your individual privacy and security when using the network. In this article you'll discover what you need to know to manage your security on LinkedIn. Listen to this article: How to Access Your Privacy and Security Settings It's essential to manage your LinkedIn privacy and security settings so your personal profile is secure, yet still visible on the network. By default, LinkedIn shares certain things you might want to keep private and keeps other things private that should be public. If you haven't edited your settings before, here's how to access them. Hover over your profile image at the top right of the screen. Then click Manage beside Privacy & Settings. LinkedIn has more than 40 security settings. Here are the ones that have the greatest impact on marketers. #1: Decide Whether to Share News Mentions LinkedIn's Mentioned in the News feature automatically finds and shares with your network news items that mention you. (LinkedIn purchased the Newsle app to curate more relevant content for members.) The default is to share your news mentions. To change this setting, go to Privacy Controls and click Turn On/Off Your News Mention Broadcasts. In the window that appears, uncheck the Yes! Let Them Know box and click Save Changes. Mentioned in the News is a fantastic feature for people who have a positive presence online. However, you'll want to turn this feature off if you or one of your clients is dealing with reputation management issues (for example, you're working with a client who is experiencing a personal social media crisis or getting negative press). Remember, there is no way to manage what gets shared with the Mentioned in the News feature. Your only option is to turn news mentions on or off. #2: Turn Off Share Profile Edits This privacy setting has less to do with your personal security and more to do with how your contacts view you and your activity. Since you don't necessarily want to alert your network of every minor change you make to your profile, I recommend that you turn off profile edits (previously called activity broadcasts). To do so, click Choose Whether or Not to Share Your Profile Edits. In the window that appears, uncheck the box and click Save Changes. You can also make this change from your profile. On the right side of your profile under Notify Your Network?, select No to turn off this feature. Turn these notifications back on for a short time when you have big news (you started a new job, signed a new client, got promoted or added something significant to your profile). Then turn them off again. #3: Decide Who Sees Your Activity Feed Your LinkedIn activity feed used to be your updates. Now it only refers to actions taken, such as following influencers, joining groups and so on. Your activity feed is visible to your network by default. As with profile edits, you probably don't want your minor activities to clutter your connections' feeds, so you can make your activity feed private. To change the setting to be more private, click Select Who Can See Your Activity Feed. In the window that appears, choose the Only You option and click Save Changes. Remember, public updates are visible to everyone, regardless of your activity feed setting. #4: Select What Others See on Your Profile In most cases, you want people to know when you've viewed their LinkedIn profile. It helps keep you top of mind and increases the know-like-trust factor. However, there may be times when you want to make your profile anonymous. For instance, if you're doing research on LinkedIn, and you don't want people to see you, make yourself completely private. Use this tactic when you check out competitors or view potential employers, employees or partners.

Facebook Organic Growth: How to Defy the Odds and Grow a Huge Facebook Community

Facebook Organic Growth: How to Defy the Odds and Grow a Huge Facebook Community

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you want to grow a massive Facebook following? Are you wondering how an organic Facebook strategy can be successful? To learn how to grow a huge organic following on Facebook using techniques you have likely never heard of, I interview Holly Homer for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Holly Homer of KidsActivitiesBlog.com to find out how her Facebook page fan base grew from 7,000 fans to more than 530,000 fans in only 8 months without using Facebook advertising or crazy gimmicks. Holly shares how beginners can develop their own Facebook strategy. You'll discover the unfortunate circumstance that jumpstarted Holly's success. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Customer Service Where the Quirky Momma Facebook page started Holly shares that she and her blogging partner Rachel had started the Quirky Momma Facebook page several years ago. While the page was mildly successful, it wasn't driving any traffic. Even though the page had shown prior growth, it had been sitting at 10K-13K fans for 18 months. In early October 2013, Rachel set a goal of getting to 50K fans by Christmas to support the spring launch of their book, 101 Kids Activities That Are the Bestest, Funnest Ever!, and started to post to the page more frequently. She says they noticed that a competing Facebook page with a huge audience was posting content from the Kids Activities Blog without providing a link back or attribution—the page was even cropping the watermarks from Holly's images and posting them with the updates. When she looked closer, Holly found that the updates from this page posting her stolen content were getting up to 9,000 shares each. Listen to the show to hear why this was a turning point for their Facebook content strategy. How they changed the approach to managing the Quirky Momma Facebook page Holly says seeing the viral impact of their stolen images made them go back and find the top 50 posts on their blog. They concentrated on only sharing posts that were already doing well on other social media sites like Pinterest—posts that had viral potential. She says that they were only sharing a few times a day and sharing mostly their own stuff because that's what they knew best. As the page grew, they realized they could help other people and started to find other really cool content to fit in with their own Facebook posts. Listen to the show to find out how Holly and Rachel used Facebook Insights to develop a successful content formatting strategy. What directs Quirky Momma's high-level strategy Holly explains that there are two things in Facebook Insights that are really important to a Facebook strategy: the People Talking About This number and reach. She laughingly says that to get a good People Talking About This number, you need people to talk about you. She explains that this means you need engagement like people commenting on, liking and sharing your updates. Listen to the show to find out why Holly believes understanding reach is at the root of success on Facebook. What makes up Quirky Momma's content mix With their main goal being to drive traffic to the Kids Activities Blog, Holly and Rachel focus on sharing amazing things to do with your kids. Holly explains that she and Rachel post to the page 26 times a day as part of a 24-hour posting strategy. Each day, they work from a posting framework and try to keep the posting ratio at 1/3 owned content to 2/3 conten...

LinkedIn Mobile: What Marketers Need to Know

LinkedIn Mobile: What Marketers Need to Know

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Have you tried the updated LinkedIn mobile app? Are you actively using LinkedIn to engage with your network? To discover how to use the LinkedIn mobile app for marketing on the go, I interview Viveka von Rosen. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Viveka von Rosen, the world's leading LinkedIn marketing expert. She authored the book LinkedIn Marketing: An Hour a Day and is the founder of Linked Into Business, a LinkedIn marketing consultancy. She moderates the Twitter chat #LinkedInChat Tuesdays at 5pm Pacific. Viveka will explore the latest mobile apps from LinkedIn and what they mean for marketers. You'll discover how to navigate the updated LinkedIn mobile app. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: LinkedIn Mobile LinkedIn's mobile apps Viveka shares that the newest LinkedIn app, the LinkedIn Mobile App is actually an update of the earlier app, but that there are a lot of other apps within LinkedIn people might not know about, such as the Job Search app. There are also the apps that came with companies purchased by LinkedIn, such as SlideShare and Connected, a Customer Relationship Management (CRM) tool. (Note: After this recording, LinkedIn announced they were retiring the Connected App on March 21, 2016.) In addition, there are tools like the Recruiter app, Sales Navigator, Lookup and Elevate which are associated with LinkedIn's premium accounts. Then there's LinkedIn's news reader, Pulse, and the new Groups app. Although all of LinkedIn apps are available to iOS users, only some are available on Android, and Viveka reminds listeners that not all of the apps are free.  For example, Elevate is a combination CRM, content management, content curation tool priced for medium to large companies. Viveka shares a free alternative to Elevate called LinkedIn Lookup, and discusses the differences between the Connected app and Lookup. Viveka talks about the new Groups app and shares ways users can take advantage of features like the Highlights tab and the @ tag function. Listen to the show to hear Viveka discuss how and why LinkedIn is focusing on mobile. Thoughts on the improved LinkedIn mobile app Viveka feels the updated LinkedIn app is significantly easier to use than the old version, which means people will use it to stay in contact with their network more often. She says users she's spoken to seem to like the update. She says there are still some minor limitations with the app, but LinkedIn appears to be on top of it. For example, early on you couldn't customize an invitation to connect on the mobile app, but LinkedIn has fixed that. Viveka goes on to discuss a current issue which affects the visibility of contact info for 1st level connections and why she thinks this is leading to a change to the Connected app. She also says that image updates have vastly improved. In the old app you had to send a picture to Evernote or Dropbox before you could share it on LinkedIn, and now you take a picture on your phone and post it immediately. Listen to the show to hear Viveka's thoughts about hashtags on LinkedIn. Navigating the app Viveka takes us through the navigation of the updated LinkedIn mobile app and starts with the Home button which takes you to a page that is similar to your home page on LinkedIn. She explains it's where you see and share updates, and she the algorithm on her mobile seems to be smarter than the desktop version. There are two pages behind the Me button, Viveka continues. The first page contains notifications about people's interaction...

How to Leverage Behavioral Analytics In Your Growth Strategy

by Today's Industry Insider @ The Kissmetrics Marketing Blog

If you’re obsessed with growth, you know how important it is to have a super detailed growth strategy. You and data are BFFs, right? Great, but you also need to understand the context that surrounds that data. I know that sounds a little dense, but bear with me. What I mean is that information alone […]

Instagram Ad Rollout Will Make It the Top Media Buy: New Research

Instagram Ad Rollout Will Make It the Top Media Buy: New Research

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you using Instagram for your business? Have you thought about advertising on the platform? Instagram just began offering paid advertising opportunities through select developer partners. In the coming months the platform is expected to create a Facebook-like self-serve option for any budget. In this article you'll discover findings from studies about Instagram's current reach, and the potential to reach targeted audiences with ads. Evolution of Instagram Ads In December 2014, Instagram reported its user base hit 300 million, 64.2 million from the U.S. alone. More exciting to brands and marketers than strict user numbers, however, was the engagement rate. Instagram users like, comment and re-gram at a rate of between 3.1% (Socialbakers research) to 4.2% (Forrester research). Comparably, Twitter and Facebook posts have engagement rates of .07% and below. Listen to this article: With population and engagement numbers like these, of course brands wanted to get access to Instagram audiences. For three years now, Facebook has been working on the correct advertising mix for Instagram. Until June 2015, businesses could only reach Instagram audiences by posting content, commenting, sharing and liking consumer posts. Instagram's few brand partners could place sponsored posts, much like Facebook's boosted posts. Strict ads, however, were not available. In June 2015, Instagram rolled out the call-to-action buttons Shop Now, Learn More and Install Now, which take users to mini-apps within Instagram, rather than brand websites. That way, users stay on Instagram once they've shopped, learned and installed. Now Instagram has provided advertising opportunities for all brands… provided you enter via one of their developer partners. These partners include Ampush, Brand Networks, 4C, Kenshoo, Nanigans, Salesforce Marketing Cloud, SocialCode and Unified. They require a minimum spend, so if you're a small business, you won't be able to take advantage of Instagram's new advertising opportunities until later in the year. Facebook's advertising followed the same path: It offered advertising to certain brands and then eventually made ads user-friendly enough that a developer intermediary was not needed. If you don't have the budget to utilize developer intermediaries, now is a good time to familiarize yourself with Instagram so that when the ads roll out to everyone, including small businesses, creating and posting an ad will be a simple task. On its blog, Instagram explains: Instagram ads will be available to advertisers of all types later this year. We are currently testing self-serve buying interfaces and APIs with a small group of partners, and we expect to make them more widely available over the coming months. With the context understood, small- and medium-sized businesses must evaluate whether Instagram is the right place for them. The following research will help with these decisions. #1: Instagram's Access to Facebook Data Offers a Significant Opportunity Lighting a fire under many marketers, Instagram currently doesn't have the pay-to-play platform that Facebook instituted in spring 2013. Before that point, companies that had built Facebook audiences had the luxury of getting each post to nearly every earned follower. Facebook then dropped organic reach to 6% and lower, forcing companies to pay to boost posts for as little as $1 per day if they wanted to reach more of their earned audience. Conversely, on Instagram, for the foreseeable future, each post will reach close to 100% of its earned audience… free! Well, free except for the time costs and any costs involved with Instagram's partners or other outside consulting. When Instagram will go to the Facebook-style pay-to-play platform is unclear. Until that time, you'll save significant marketing dollars experimenting with which content wins the most attention, engagement and likes. This said,

YouTube Success: How to Create a Successful YouTube Channel

YouTube Success: How to Create a Successful YouTube Channel

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use video in your marketing? Are you wondering how YouTube can help promote your business? To learn about how to get started with marketing your business with YouTube, I interview Gideon Shalwick for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Gideon Shalwick, an online video marketing expert. His blog and YouTube channel help businesses understand how to achieve success with YouTube. He also wrote the ebook Rapid Video Blogging. Gideon shares why YouTube is increasingly important for your business. You'll learn about the strategies you need to succeed and how to promote your videos to grow your audience. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: YouTube for Business Why is YouTube important for business? Over the last year or two, Gideon has seen a huge increase in interest from businesses when it comes to YouTube. In the past, it was hard to try to use YouTube as a business tool. Back then, people used it for different reasons. Today businesses have started to wake up to the opportunities. YouTube's statistics show more than 1 billion unique users to their site each month. There's over 6 billion hours of video watched each month on YouTube. That's almost an hour for every person on earth. This number has increased by 50% from last year. There are 100 hours of video uploaded to YouTube every minute. According to Nielsen, YouTube reaches more U.S. adults ages 18–34 than any other cable network. When you take these statistics into account, you can see where your potential target audience is. YouTube is also an amazing tool to make good connections with your audience. Now that people can consume video on their smartphones, the mobile uptake has been phenomenal. Gideon shares how more and more people have started to watch YouTube videos on their television screens. If you look at videos that went viral on YouTube in 2012, 8 out of 10 were not your average cat or baby video, they were all professionally produced by someone who knew what they were doing. It's a sign that the game has changed on YouTube. Gideon believes we are still at the start of the game when it comes to the opportunity available for business exposure. Our 2013 Social Media Marketing Industry Report shows that 69% of marketers plan on increasing their YouTube marketing in 2013. You'll hear Gideon's story of how he got started with YouTube and discovered how it was good for business. Listen to the show to find out why there are no competitors on YouTube, only collaborators. What you should think about when planning your YouTube strategy Gideon states that you need to be very strategic when you set up your YouTube channels. A lot of people think that it's about the views, but that's not the case. When Gideon thinks about his own strategy and when he helps others, he always starts with the Hedgehog Concept. You'll learn how this concept relates to two different kinds of businesses. The concept is defined as the overlap of three things: Your area of passion Your area of skill or the thing that you can become the best at How you can make money from it When these three things overlap like a Venn diagram, the middle is your Hedgehog Concept. You'll learn how this can help you identify your target audience's needs. The effort you put into it will help you grow your business for long-term success. Gideon believes the two functions that YouTube offers for business are exposure and relationshi...

How to Craft Instagram Posts That Drive Sales

How to Craft Instagram Posts That Drive Sales

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you use Instagram to promote your products and services? Interested in ways to drive sales with your posts? A good Instagram post is not as simple as just snapping a photo, applying a filter and posting it to your news feed. To have a real impact, your posts need to be carefully crafted and shared with purpose and intent. In this article you'll discover how to create Instagram posts that increase engagement and drive sales. Listen to this article: #1: Design Images to Capture Attention If you're posting a photo of a product on Instagram, be creative with the shot and make sure it reflects well on the product. Find an Interesting Angle Think about whether you should show the entire product, frame the shot a certain way or include another item to accompany the product. Warby Parker posts creative photos of their eyewear on Instagram, often garnering more than 2,000 likes per post. Even with a simple pair of glasses, there are hundreds of ways to capture it in a photo. Once you find the most effective angle for your products, stick with that approach and be consistent. Don't forget that your Instagram posts are also part of your brand. Focus on Lighting Whether photos are taken indoors or outdoors, good lighting is crucial. This may seem like Photography 101, but lighting also tells a story about your product. Even with careful tweaking and tuning, Instagram's editing tools often can't fix a photo taken with poor lighting. Think about whether your photo should be shown in color or in black and white, and how to portray it best. Prada posts a variety of photos taken in unique lighting. Their exceptional professional shots speak specifically to their brand. Use a Filter Instagram realized early on that much of the app's value and appeal was in its filters. Each filter has a unique story that it communicates. While there is some evidence that photos with no filters perform best, filters may be necessary to achieve a coherent look for your brand. The novelty of the #nofilter hashtag excites some users, but artistically edited photos contribute to the purpose of your posts. Does the X-Pro II filter or Valencia filter present your product in a refreshing or edgy way? There is an array of filters at your disposal to communicate a particular mood for your brand and products. #2: Tell a Story With the Caption You can give life to a photo with the caption. Nike's caption here is evocative and tells a story instead of merely describing the product. It's important to identify what type of description resonates best with your audience. In Nike's case, this photo represents the culmination of training for the Chicago Marathon. #3: Add Relevant Hashtags Hashtags make your photos discoverable. Use popular hashtags when they apply to your photo or your brand. It's best to stick with three to five hashtags at a time. You don't want to overload your photo with too many hashtags because that can be viewed as desperation. Also be cautious about piggybacking on current trending hashtags. Some brands create their own relevant hashtags, such as Tiffany & Co.’s #TiffanyLeather or #TiffanyAtlas, strategically crossed with more purpose-driven popular tags. Create a Hashtag Campaign Regramming user-generated content is one of the best ways to promote your community and products. Create a brand-centric hashtag campaign for your followers to use. Stitch Fix asks their fashion-forward followers to showcase their styling choices with the hashtag #StitchFixFriday. This hashtag not only fosters a sense of community, but also reaffirms who your audience is. Remember that engagement is a two-way street. Follow and pay attention to your followers, and like the posts that are strategically and aesthetically aligned with your brand. #4: Use a Call to Action Consider adding a call to action to your post, which prompts customers or shoppers to do something.

H1 and H2 Heading Tags for SEO – How You Should Use Them? - eMoneyIndeed

H1 and H2 Heading Tags for SEO – How You Should Use Them? - eMoneyIndeed


eMoneyIndeed

If you are a website looking to optimize your web documents with SEO, it is crucial for you to get y

8 Collaboration Tools to Improve Your Content

8 Collaboration Tools to Improve Your Content

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you part of a team that collaborates on content? Want tools to make the collaboration process more efficient? Whether you're working on blog post or creating social media updates, the more people involved, the richer the results can be. Using collaboration tools makes the process smooth and seamless. In this article I'll share eight collaboration tools to improve your productivity. Listen to this article: #1: Map Out Content Using MindMeister MindMeister is an effective brain-mapping tool that allows you to visually break down complex concepts and show how each idea flows into another. It's perhaps the fastest, easiest way to get a point across effectively. MindMeister is browser-based and available on mobile apps. There are a variety of templates and numerous additional features for brainstorming, project plans and more. Map out your content strategy with your team, no matter where they're located. Price: Free plan gives you access to three maps. Note: MindMeister collaboration features are included in the free plan. There are multiple premium plan options, starting at $36 for 6 months with a 30-day free trial. #2: Brainstorm in Real Time With Scribblar Scribblar is an educational tool that can also be used for collaborative brainstorming sessions. Primarily an educational tool, Scribblar is a favorite among students and teachers for its ability to create multiple "rooms" that allow you to collaborate in real time. Plus, you can text and audio chat during the process. While there is an obvious academic tone, Scribblar is a great tool for creative people who excel when they let their ideas flow in a free-form conversation. When working on your content plan, eliminate endless emails and conference calls. Just jump onto Scribblar and work on the same dashboard together. Price: A very limited free plan (2 users, 1 room) and a variety of premium plans that start at $9 a month are available. Note: Chatwoo can be a good free alternative. It's online chat room software which is completely free. You can use it to collaborate with your team (on a private corporate site) or with your site visitors. #3: Compile Research on Cyfe Cyfe is a multi-purpose research and productivity dashboard that lets you collect data, create to-do lists, archive search results and more. It helps you monitor social media mentions and activity too. For companies that need a bit more oomph in their collaborative tools, Cyfe provides a long feature list to help users work together in the cloud. Price: There's a free plan with the option to upgrade to premium ($19 per month; $14 a month if paid annually). #4: Plan Editorial on GatherContent Specifically designed for collaborating, GatherContent is every social media manager's and blog editor's dream. It allows you to create an effective project or editorial calendar that has everything in the same place, and is organized through the same dashboard. This ultra-organized information keeps everyone on the team on the same page. GatherContent is easy to use and minimizes the task of managing workflow, no matter how many people you invite to be a part of the process. Never cross wires or miss deadlines again. Price: $79 per month with a 30-day free trial. Note: Check out CoSchedule as another option. #5: Manage Projects on Trello If you need a simple way to set tasks for everyone on your team, Trello is probably the best project management tool for this purpose. Once you have a plan, create boards and then pin cards with tasks to each one. Then, write either checklists or standard text instructions for what each task entails, and assign those cards to different team members. When the work is done, attach documents to the completed card if you like and list it as complete. Also, @tag team members to quickly get their attention and connect with them. Price: Free. Note: Also check out Wrike for easy project management.

Visual Storytelling: How to Use Visuals, Videos and Social Media to Market Your Business

Visual Storytelling: How to Use Visuals, Videos and Social Media to Market Your Business

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use visuals to market your business? Are you wondering how you can tell a story with visuals? To learn how your business can benefit from visual storytelling, I interview Ekaterina Walter for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Ekaterina Walter, chief marketing officer at Branderati and author of Think Like Zuck. Her newest book is called The Power of Visual Storytelling. Ekaterina shares why storytelling is important for your business. You'll discover how to get started, the type of visuals that work and brands that do it well. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Visual Storytelling How did you fall into visual storytelling? Ekaterina explains how her job at Intel for the last 5 years was building social business, and it was during her final 3 years there that she started to notice the perfect shift to visual storytelling. So for her, visual storytelling was a natural progression. Several years ago, she started to look at the data and usage of visuals versus the usage of just text and links. This led to her first blog post on Fast Company, called The Rise of Visual Social Media. You'll hear why this particular article led Ekaterina to write more on this subject. Ekaterina believes that the reason why visuals are so well-received is that we are moving into a world that is inundated with information. There are filters that allow us to stand out from the noise. One of them, in Ekaterina's view, is visual marketing and visual storytelling. Listen to the show to find out what term Ekaterina uses for the world we are moving into. What is visual storytelling and why should marketers consider it for their business? The way that visual storytelling is defined in Ekaterina's new book, The Power of Visual Storytelling, is the use of images, video, infographics and potentially presentations and other visuals in social media. The use of visuals on social media platforms can help you craft a graphic story around your brand's key values and offerings. It helps show who you are as a brand and makes consumers want to connect with you. With the rise of millennials (digital natives and the younger generation), it's essential that they not only know what you offer or how useful a product is, but also how they can be part of the movement and fit within that tribe. It's what visual storytelling allows you to do. It's how you reach that emotional connection with your customers. Recently, Jason Miller of LinkedIn created a widely shared infographic titled, A Well-Balanced Blog. The reason why this type of content works is that it's simple thinking. Our brains process visuals 60,000 times faster than text. About 93% of all communication is nonverbal. You'll hear an example of how you can gather a story from an image, rather than a word on its own. The emotional connection is critical. Studies show that blog posts with visuals drive up to 180% more engagement than those without. This means that a visual image can allow people to digest your content, then decide if they want to continue to read the article. The amount of information that is produced every 48 hours is the same amount that was produced from the beginning of time up until 2003. Every year, our attention span becomes shorter. Now it's about 3-8 seconds. Therefore you need to grab people's attention immediately. Sephora is a great example of a brand that uses images very well.

How to Use LinkedIn to Connect With Prospects

How to Use LinkedIn to Connect With Prospects

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you use LinkedIn to find business opportunities? Are you looking for tips to reach new leads? LinkedIn has a number of features that make it easy to develop relationships with the right prospects for your business. In this article, you'll discover four ways to use LinkedIn for business. Listen to this article: #1: Identify Warm Prospects With over 420 million global members, LinkedIn is the best social media platform for businesses to find and connect with potential prospects. It provides an effective way to bypass gatekeepers and directly access your ideal clients. Finding and connecting directly with these decision-makers will not only save you time and energy, but will also make you more successful in your prospecting activities. The best place to start is with warm prospects, and here's where to look for them. Who's Viewed Your Posts If you post on LinkedIn Publisher, you can find warm prospects on the Who's Viewed Your Posts page. Look below the graph and demographics for each post, and you'll see a list of every person who has interacted with the post. You can view them by Likes, Comments, and Shares, and you can even see what they said in their comment or share. Not only are these people familiar with you, but they've also had a positive interaction with your content. If you find someone who matches your target client, send a personalized connection request mentioning their comment or share. Followers Look at the top of your followers list to see the people you're not connected to. These people like your content and posts so much they've chosen to follow you and receive notifications about you, even though you're not connected to them. Be sure to do a little research and look for a good reason to connect when you send a personalized connection request to them. Updates On your Updates page, you'll find every piece of content you've interacted with, whether you posted it or just engaged with it. Scroll through your most recent interactions. In each post, look at the people who posted or commented. If you hover over their name, you'll be able to see if you're connected with them. If you aren't connected and would like to be, go to their profile page and send a connection request that references the post. Who's Viewed Your Profile The people listed on the Who's Viewed Your Profile page are people who have visited your profile. If you have a free account, you can look below the graph at the top to see the last five people who've viewed your profile. If you have a premium account, you'll have access to the entire list for the last 90 days. If you see anyone you're not connected to and connecting would be a benefit, consider sending a connection request. When personalizing it, find another reason he or she would find value from connecting; not just saying, "I saw you viewed my profile." If seeing your profile was a good enough reason to connect, that person would have already sent you a connection request. #2: Create Trust It doesn't help you to simply "collect connections." Once you've found and connected with potential prospects or partners, it's important to build a relationship with your connections. There are a number of ways that you can strengthen your relationships and stay top of mind. Comment and Share An easy way to interact and get on the radar of your connections is to comment on or share their status updates and Publisher posts. Ensure that you tag them when appropriate, as this both alerts them to your share or comment and also gives them exposure to your network. In the case of both comments and sharing, always make sure that your engagement with your connection makes sense and doesn't come across as spammy or unprofessional, and that you only post content that will be of real benefit or interest to your network. Make Introductions Few things leave as strong an impression as when someone gives witho...

Blog Comments Revisited: Why Major Bloggers Are Turning Comments Back On

Blog Comments Revisited: Why Major Bloggers Are Turning Comments Back On

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you have comments enabled on your blog? Have you ever turned them off? To discover why big bloggers turned their comment systems back on, I interview Michael Hyatt and Brian Clark. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Michael Hyatt and Brian Clark. Michael is author of Platform and co-author of the new book, Living Forward: A Proven Plan to Stop Drifting and Get the Life You Want. He's also an avid blogger at MichaelHyatt.com and host of the This Is Your Life podcast. Brian is CEO of Rainmaker Digital, founder of Copyblogger, host of the Unemployable podcast, and evangelist for the Rainmaker Platform. Back in May 2014, I had Mark Schaefer and Tim McDonald (who was with Huffington Post) on the show to talk about the trend of big blogs shutting down their comments. This was spurred by a controversial post from Copyblogger entitled, "Why We’re Removing Comments on Copyblogger" from March 2014. In January 2015, Michael Hyatt published, "I’ve Pulled Comments from My Blog-Here’s Why." Michael and Brian will explore why the initial decision to remove comments was made and why those comments are now back. You'll also discover tips for how to grow your email list. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Blog Comments Revisited Why Brian shut down comments Brian starts by saying he is not the one who made the decision to shut down or bring back blog comments. He left that up to his editorial team. On Copyblogger, a lot of the article feedback shifted to social media, while the product development feedback had moved over to their customer base. As you mature as a company, you really start listening to your existing customers, as opposed to those "out in the wild," Brian explains. At the time, they had 150,000 customers and their strategy was to pay more attention to them. Part of the decision to remove comments (not discussed in the post by Sonia Simone, who ultimately made the decision with input from the editorial team) was a situation Brian calls the six-month class of current commenters. When you publish a marketing blog, other marketers use commenting as a traffic strategy. You'd have six months of the same people showing up, leaving comments: some stupid, some thoughtful. Then they'd move on and a new group of people would come into the comments. The practical reasons for removing comments were the shift to social and to eliminate spam. It's a big deal to moderate comments and have the editorial team spend a significant amount of time trying to figure out whether something is spam or legitimate. Copyblogger's experiment to remove comments lasted for over a year. Listen to the show to learn why Brian left comments on their podcast network, Rainmaker.fm. Why Michael shut down comments Michael says his reasons for shutting down comments on his blog were similar to Brian's. Additionally, Michael noticed the number of comments per post had been going down for some time, so he decided to do a little research. He discovered that in 2011, he averaged about 195 comments per blog post. Then in 2012, while his traffic went up, his comments dropped to an average of 179. Traffic went up again in 2013, and the average number of comments went down to 114. In 2014 blog traffic was up 74% over the previous year, but the average number of comments had dropped down to about 62 per post. Michael adds he read Greg McKeown's book, Essentialism, and thought he had to pare stuff back. The final straw for Michael, who was and is using Disqus as his commenting platform,

How to Easily Manage Multiple Twitter Accounts

How to Easily Manage Multiple Twitter Accounts

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you managing multiple Twitter accounts? Wondering how to streamline your Twitter marketing? TweetDeck lets you engage, monitor, and schedule tweets for multiple accounts from a single customizable dashboard. In this article you'll discover how to manage multiple Twitter accounts with TweetDeck. Listen to this article: #1: Connect Your Twitter Accounts The first step is to set up your TweetDeck account. If your company has one or two people monitoring social media, you can create one login using your company's handle as the default account. Then you can add more accounts/handles to that same user login. After you log into TweetDeck, you'll see your TweetDeck dashboard. The gray navigation bar on the left side of the dashboard is your go-to location for everything TweetDeck can do. From there, you can add accounts, write new tweets, review activity and notifications, read messages, change settings, and more. To connect additional accounts, click on the Accounts icon near the bottom of the navigation bar. Next, click Add Another Twitter Account and enter the username and password for each account you want to manage. Now you're ready to begin. #2: Add Listening Streams The most powerful TweetDeck feature is the ability to add streams, which are columns of tweets that are updated in real time. There are a number of different streams to choose from, such as User, Notifications, Mentions, Followers, Messages, Search, Lists, and more. To add a stream, click on the Add Column icon (with the + sign on it) in the navigation bar. Then select the column type you want to add. You can customize the content of each column and remove excess noise. This makes it easier to find the information you want. Click the icon in the upper-right corner of the column to access your filtering options. Keep in mind that adding lots of streams isn't always better. It's important to choose the columns that will help you reach your marketing goals. Here are five streams that you'll want to add. Notifications The Notifications stream allows you to see when you have a new follower, someone has added you to a list, or one of your tweets has been liked, retweeted, or replied to. Using this stream, you can quickly find active and potential clients, customers, and followers. Essentially it lets you monitor every handle that is engaging with your content. You can use additional filters to narrow down your notifications to engagement, users, and content type. Mentions Add the Mentions stream to monitor every tweet that mentions your Twitter handle, whether for the first time or as part of a reply/conversation. By monitoring and using this stream daily, your marketing team can track every company mention, and then react in a timely manner. You can quickly jump into conversations, offer customer support, or engage with your existing user base or potential prospects. Search Search is one of the most important streams in TweetDeck. It allows your marketing team to go beyond users and monitor content related to keywords or hashtags. Using the Search feature, you can keep an eye on topics and conversations that are essential to your business. For example, if your company is about to launch a new technology product, your marketing team can set up a Search stream to monitor all tweets for keywords such as new technology, today in tech, #techtuesday, and so on. Bonus Tip: When setting up this stream, don't forget to use Boolean operators to save space. This way, you can search for multiple terms in the same column. Messages The Messages stream allows you to read and reply to direct messages for any accounts you've added to TweetDeck. This is where you can turn your Twitter following into real engagement with prospects and influencers in your industry. Once you have this set up, you can respond quickly and appropriately as the discussion occurs.

SlideShare: How to Market Your Business With This Growing Platform

SlideShare: How to Market Your Business With This Growing Platform

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use SlideShare? Are you looking for more leads? To learn how SlideShare can help marketers, I interview Todd Wheatland for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Todd Wheatland, author of The Marketer's Guide to SlideShare. He's also head of Thought Leadership at Kelly Services. Todd shares his insights into how SlideShare can be used to generate more exposure and leads for your business. You'll learn the tactics to use and the mistakes to avoid to ensure you get the most out of this platform. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: SlideShare for Business Why marketers should take a closer look at SlideShare Todd believes there are three reasons why marketers should take a closer look at SlideShare. 1. Pure traffic. SlideShare is one of the highest-traffic sites on the Internet, receiving over 60 million unique visitors every month. It gives sheer exposure to your potential audience and SlideShare credibility for search engines. You'll discover amazing things that can happen when you use the same content from your website on SlideShare. The inter-play between content and distribution in one place is very unique in terms of what SlideShare delivers. 2. Business audience. It's a platform that's about business. You'll find out the six words that are the most used tags on content in SlideShare. 3. Leads. The lead-capturing model that SlideShare has been using for the last couple of years is a very simple tool. It's easy for the visitor. You'll hear about how flexible the lead form is for the marketer and the control it gives when you ask for lead generation. A quick overview of SlideShare Todd explains how SlideShare began as a place for people to upload the PowerPoints they were presenting at a conference or an event. Since then, it has evolved into a content marketing platform for any form of digital content. With SlideShare, you can take any sort of presentation and insert videos and record an audio track and lay it over the top. You can then even use it as an audiovisual presentation. It's a platform for you to share any type of digital content including Word documents, infographics, webcasts and HD video. It has moved far beyond the original premise. If you're a blogger with great content on your blog and you choose to house it on SlideShare, you could decide to use your content on SlideShare specifically to capture leads. There are certain ways to handle lead capture on SlideShare versus your own site. Todd states that if you have content that has a complex design, when you host that document on SlideShare, it enables you to embed it very neatly. You'll learn why you should think of it as an enhanced YouTube embed, rather than seeing it as something competing with your website. It supports and drives traffic to your own platform. Listen to the show to find out why the average use on SlideShare is probably far less sophisticated than what the average marketer or professional is using and trying to achieve out of it. How Kelly Services uses SlideShare Todd shares how Kelly Services started to get deep on SlideShare about 2-3 years ago. At present, they have an off-brand on SlideShare called The Talent Project. It's where all their major content items including research reports, ebooks, infographics and videos are stored. You'll hear why they have a platinum network account and how it works for them. The "network" part means that their most prolific con...

5 Facebook Ads Changes: What Marketers Need to Know

5 Facebook Ads Changes: What Marketers Need to Know

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you curious about the latest Facebook ad changes? Wondering how to take your Facebook ads to the next level? Facebook has gone all in to provide businesses with tools and targeting options to connect with customers and prospects in the moments that matter. In this article I'll share the five biggest things to happen with Facebook ads. Listen to this article: #1: Call Now Button Connects You to Mobile Users Facebook launched a local awareness initiative in 2014 that gave advertisers the option to add a Get Directions call-to-action button to their ads. This year Facebook took it up a notch with the Call Now button. This is an important lead generation tool for businesses of all kinds, but especially local businesses. It basically takes an entire stage right out of the funnel. Rather than send people to your website or Facebook page hoping they'll contact you, the Call Now button allows you to let people call you directly from your ad. Smart targeting on Facebook can get you in front of motivated consumers on mobile. Adding the Call Now button gives people a direct link to convert from the ad, no extra steps required. #2: Dynamic Product Ads Sync With Sales Catalogs As powerful as Google Shopping ads are, it only made sense that Facebook would enter this arena, too. Though they serve a similar purpose, Facebook’s product ads do not work in the same way as Google's product listing ads. Facebook's product ads are actually more like Google's dynamic remarketing display ads. They use Facebook's targeting parameters, or the consumer's history on your site or in your app to serve ads. The ads are template-based, meaning you don't have to spend time on new creative for each ad. The templates pull images, product names, pricing and other attributes from your catalog, based on the keywords you've provided. This catalog integration also means your ads will stop running once your product is out of stock. Best of all, these templates work for news feed and sidebar ads across all displays, so you don't need separate ads for desktop, tablet and mobile. #3: Carousel Ads Come to Mobile Facebook launched carousel ads last year, but this summer they extended the option to mobile. This format has a lot of interesting possibilities, thanks to its ability to display multiple images with different links within one ad unit. This mobile carousel ad from Tinker Crate spotlights different features and views of their product. This spring, Neiman Marcus used carousel ads to showcase shoe and handbag collections and reported three times more conversions and 85% higher click-through rates, compared to standard ad units. The average lift in conversion across early testers was 12%. Given the natural inclination to swipe sideways on mobile, carousel ads are an intuitive, seamless ad format for mobile users that gives you a creative, engaging way to tell stories. #4: Updated Ad Tools Boost Productivity A June overhaul gave Facebook Ads Manager and Power Editor facelifts, as well as added functionality. On the Power Editor side, this release offers a more logical interface, but also enhances bulk editing and advanced search capabilities. Ads Manager has a more streamlined feel, with performance metrics featured more prominently. Facebook said the update means "advertisers can quickly reference how their ads are performing in the same environment where they create and edit them." Essentially, you now create your ads and manage them in one place. What's particularly awesome about this update is that you can bulk-edit the targeting and budgets for several ads at once and use the Create Similar option to duplicate ads and campaigns. If you aren't seeing these new features yet, don't worry. They're rolling out globally in the coming months. #5: Ads Manager App Brings Campaign Management to Mobile Small- and medium-sized advertisers rejoiced earlier this year when Facebook released...

Basic Crawl Management for SEO

by Michael Martinez @ SEO Theory

Crawl management is integral to search engine optimization. And yet crawl management is so poorly explained by the Web marketing community that many sites mismanage crawl.  What should be one of the fundamental areas of search engine optimization has been…

How to Use Snapchat for Business

How to Use Snapchat for Business

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you interested in using Snapchat for your business? Wondering how to integrate it into your marketing? Snapchat presents a unique opportunity to reach a new audience that is receptive to clever, creative marketing. In this article you'll discover how to use Snapchat in your social media marketing. Listen to this article: Why Use Snapchat? Snapchat is the fastest-growing social network with more than 100 million daily active users. Of the businesses that market on social media, most use Facebook, but only 2% use Snapchat. The lack of competition on Snapchat means that your business has a great opportunity to stand out and shine on the platform. Unlike other social networks, it doesn't matter when you post content on Snapchat. Your snaps will never be buried in a busy timeline; they stay unopened until your followers have time to view them. After snaps are opened, they're available for only 1 to 10 seconds. Snaps disappear so quickly, so you may be wondering if Snapchat is worth the effort. If you think about it, most social content is viewed right after it's posted. Content tends to last longer on platforms like Pinterest and Tumblr, but it's far more common for social posts to have a short shelf life. Snapchat makes this short shelf life an explicit part of the platform. Because snaps vanish after one viewing, you have users' undivided attention. In this way, disappearing content is actually a boon for marketers. Here's how to get started integrating Snapchat into your social media marketing. #1: Develop Content First, you'll need to develop content for Snapchat. Here are some ideas that you may want to try: Create valuable tutorials about something in your area of expertise. For example, show people how to easily thread a needle or explain how to choose a secure password. Give users a glimpse behind the scenes at your company. Show them how your product is made, share the inspiration and ethos behind your company or chat with artists. Show your product in action. For example, show a person wearing your dress or reading your book. Ask users for pictures or videos of them using your product, and send out snaps featuring them. Those fans will feel valued, and your audience will discover different ways they can use your product. Repurpose content from other social networks, but make sure it's tailored to Snapchat. The tone should be casual and funny, similar to Vine and Tumblr. No social feed should be 100% self-promotion, so tell interesting stories that relate to your industry. Share a cool tip from an industry leader or give an opinion on a recent event. #2: Invite Participation Social media should be social, not a one-way megaphone for promotions. Replying to every snap isn't practical or scalable, but you can certainly do it every now and again. Imagine how great it would feel if your favorite guitar brand replied to your snap of a song. You can give your followers that feeling, too. Ask people to reply to your snap or post a reply on another social network. Sephora has used this tactic with sweepstakes. They asked users to take pictures of themselves with makeup doodles and post them to other social networks. Consider following people back on Snapchat. When they send you snaps, read them and reply if appropriate. This goes a long way towards letting users know you're a real person or a real social team behind a brand. #3: Get Creative After deciding what content you'll develop, think about how you can present it in a creative way. Here are some ways to do that: Draw or write on pictures to add humor or emphasis. Dove uses Snapchat to inspire viewers to celebrate their own beauty. In this snap the company drew on the image with bold colors to emphasize their message. Find clever ways to get people to sit up and pay attention. GrubHub used a series of images showing a pizza being eaten slice by slice to create suspense before revealing ...

5 Tips to Improve Your Social Media Ad Campaigns

5 Tips to Improve Your Social Media Ad Campaigns

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want more from your social media efforts? Are you ready to try ad targeting? Using the right tactics to deliver and follow up on social media ad campaigns generates better quality leads. In this article you'll discover five tips to improve your social media ad campaigns. Listen to this article: #1: Use Keywords in Ads Before you write the copy for your ads, it's important to know what people are searching for in your industry or area of expertise. To learn more about how your target audience searches for your products, do a keyword analysis (Google has a great one). To get started, go to Google AdWords and sign in. Next, hover over Tools and select Keyword Planner from the drop-down menu. Click the Search for Keywords button on the right. To search for keywords, enter a phrase or website or select a category. Once you click Get Ideas, you'll watch a list of topics populate. Now you can create an ad campaign around your keywords. #2: Serve Ads to Current Customers Many marketers focus heavily on acquiring new customers. But what if all of your current customers bought your product one more time? What if they bought a more expensive service? Think about what that would do for your sales. Radian6/Salesforce estimates that it costs 5 to 10 times more to bring in a new customer than it does to retain a past customer. That eye-opening number is the reason you want to take steps to retain customers. An effective way to do that is to create a custom audience by uploading your current list of customer email addresses for use in ads on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter. To get started on Facebook, open Power Editor and click the Audiences tab at the top of the page. At the top right, click Create Audience and select Custom Audience from the drop-down menu. Select the type of audience you want to create. Next, upload a CSV or TXT file with your current customers' email addresses. When you're finished, click Create Audience. Facebook then matches your email addresses to user login information. When the process is complete, you'll see the following confirmation message. Click Done to save your audience. You can now select your custom list for your Facebook ads to market directly to people who already know and love your brand. This is a great way to get previous customers to come back more often. #3: Reach More Prospects With Lookalike Audiences Similar to custom audiences, lookalike audiences leverage your current customer list to find people who are similar to your current customers. When you create a lookalike audience in Facebook, the platform sources the top 1% of Facebook users who most closely match your established customers' behavior. This is a little-known way to reach your target market at a lower cost. A lower CPC (cost per click) means your budget will stretch farther. To create a lookalike audience, go to Power Editor and click the Audiences tab at the top of the page. At the top right, click Create Audience and select Lookalike Audience from the drop-down menu. From the Source drop-down list, select a custom audience, conversion pixel or Facebook page. Then select the country where you'd like to find a similar set of people. Finally, use the slider to set your desired audience size. When you're finished, click Create Audience to create your lookalike audience. #4: Qualify Leads by Connecting on LinkedIn One of the quickest ways to open doors on social media is to reach out to prospects on LinkedIn. Send messages to their inbox and start building relationships that will help you qualify them as a genuine lead. Most personal profiles will list an email address and phone number you can use to reach out and make introductions. If you upgrade your LinkedIn account, you can filter your searches by industry, years of experience, location, current company, seniority level and more.

Small Business Social: How to Build Relationships

Small Business Social: How to Build Relationships

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use social media to attract and engage customers? Are you wondering how you can use social media to market your business and drive sales? To learn how you can develop relationships with social media and content, I interview Jeff Korhan for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Jeff Korhan, author of Built-In Social: Essential Social Marketing Practices for Every Small Business. He also trains and coaches small businesses on social media marketing at Jeff Korhan.com. Jeff shares his knowledge of and experience with social marketing from running his own small business, and how you can implement it into your business. You'll learn about the 'Social Marketing Process' and the importance of collaboration and cooperation. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Build Relationships With Content and Social Media What did the experience of running a local landscaping company teach you about social marketing? When Jeff first started his local landscaping business, he had just completed 10 years in the corporate world and was fairly ignorant of how small businesses operated. He started to research and study the industry he was about to move into and discovered by accident that small businesses were less formal than the corporate world. Even back then, people wanted to get to know you. Today it's something that can easily be done with social media. You'll find out what Jeff discovered about consumers and why it was the key to getting his business off the ground. Jeff explains how going door-to-door led him down the road to content marketing. Not only did he spend a lot of time with customers, he also spent time reaching out to other people in his industry. The one thing they all had in common was that they all used Yellow Pages for advertising. This led him to explore other options to stand out from his competitors. You'll discover what kind of advertising worked for Jeff and an example of an ad he used. Jeff figured out before the age of social media that he could get business by educating his consumers with his expertise. He started to look for a way to differentiate his business from local competitors and found out that there were a lot of unanswered questions. You'll find out what you need to do to resonate with your customers to help build your business. Listen to the show to find out why you need to start thinking of how you can be the source of answers and how educating people can make you an authority. The Social Marketing Process  Jeff explains the 3-step Social Marketing Process, which is: Content attraction Social engagement Sales conversion The first component is that content attracts attention. You should start at the beginning. Use content to attract the attention of people to help build an audience. You need to publish the information online, where people can find it. The second component is to engage with people and develop relationships using social media. Over time, once you have developed trust, this is when the third component, the sales conversion, almost becomes a byproduct if you've got a sales process in place and you know how to convert people to whatever it is you're selling. Jeff finds that some businesses don't have a reliable sales process. In his book, he writes about how to develop that process and if you have one, how to make it even better. When it comes to knowing what kind of content to produce,

How to Publish Content on Apple News: A Step-by-Step Guide

How to Publish Content on Apple News: A Step-by-Step Guide

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want more exposure for your content? Have you considered publishing your content on Apple News? Apple News lets you deliver both visual and text-based content directly to a growing number of iOS mobile devices. In this article, you'll discover how to become an Apple News publisher. Listen to this article: What Is Apple News? Apple News is a preinstalled application on every iOS device (version iOS 9 or later). The app delivers traditional text-based content, videos, and photo galleries from a variety of sources, including magazines, websites, and newspapers. Anyone in the US, UK, and Australia can sign up as a publisher and produce content for Apple News. Once you publish an article, it's added to the Apple News app, and the content is automatically optimized for all iOS devices. This ensures that readers have a great experience, no matter which device they're using. Before you can publish content for Apple News, you need to sign up as a publisher. Here's how to get started. #1: Sign Into iCloud To start the sign-up process, go to http://www.icloud.com/newspublisher/ and then click Continue. Sign into your iCloud account with your Apple ID (which is your device's associated ID). You'll need to accept the end user license agreement to continue. #2: Provide Publisher and Channel Information On the next page, fill out your publisher information and then click Next. You'll also need to provide additional information to set up your channel. When you're finished, click Next. #3: Upload a Logo You now have the option to upload a channel logo. (Note: You can skip this step.) Make sure your logo is a PNG file with a minimum size of 256 pixels square. The file size limit is 2MB. Click here for more details about logo specifications. Note that after you complete your registration, Apple will review your logo, and if it doesn't satisfy the requirements, they won't accept your application, and you may have to start over again. #4: Choose a Publishing Format Next, you can choose from two different publishing methods: RSS feed (there's no change in user experience, which means you can't use Apple's article format) or the Apple News Format, which optimizes your content for iOS devices. Use the Apple News Format To use Apple's News Format for your content, all you have to do is to click Sign Up for Apple News Format. Once you click the button, your application will automatically be sent for review. Use the RSS Feed for Your Blog or Website To use the RSS feed for your website or blog, click on I'd Rather Use RSS for Now. This choice takes you to the next step where you have to provide the RSS feed of your website. It's easy to find your feed URL. Visit your website and right-click anywhere on the page. From the menu, select Inspect Element or Inspect. Once the window appears with the HTML code of your page, use the Find feature (press Ctrl+F on Windows, Command+F on a Mac) and search for "RSS." It will then be highlighted on the screen like this. Copy your feed link and then paste it into the form. When you're finished, click Next. After accepting the terms and conditions, you can submit your application. You're all set! Apple will review your application and get back to you within a few days. Note: Ads served by Apple are not available if you only present your content via RSS. #5: Submit Articles for Approval After you're approved as a publisher, you're required to submit some articles for review. To do that, you can either create an article in News Publisher or use your existing content management system (CMS). To create an article in News Publisher, sign in and select News Publisher from the menu. If you need further information about the features, check out the official guide. If you prefer to connect your CMS with News Publisher, you'll need to use a plugin or write the code yourself. Fortunately,

Best Content Management Systems and SEO

by Jonathan Hochman @ Hochman Consultants

Before the importance of search engine optimization (SEO) was fully understood by the web developer and business communities, Content Management Systems (CMS) were invented to help companies large and small easily build and update their web sites. As a result,…

The post Best Content Management Systems and SEO appeared first on Hochman Consultants.

26 Tips to Improve Your Pinterest Marketing

26 Tips to Improve Your Pinterest Marketing

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Could your Pinterest marketing use a jumpstart? Are you curious about what's working for other businesses? Tweaking techniques that have been successful for others can help you drive traffic, connect with your target audience, and increase sales. In this article, you'll discover 26 tips to improve your Pinterest marketing. Listen to this article: #1: Share Pin It for Later Links The Pin It button encourages users to pin content from your site onto their own boards. Engagement is captured even when users aren't on the platform. The same idea holds true for Pin It for Later links. You can post Pin It for Later links, along with the prompt "Pin it for Later" across social media. To create a Pin It for Later link, attach the URL of the pin you want users to save, add it to a post on social media after explaining what it is, and attach it to the phrase "Pin it for later!" This is a great way to drive traffic to Pinterest and build up repins. #2: Add 20-30 Keywords in Promoted Pins Keywords are the most important targeting feature you can use with promoted pins. Pinterest recommends that you use 20-30 keywords per promoted pin. That's just enough to get you noticed, but not so many that you're showing your content to the wrong people. Using a large number of keywords can help you cover all of the broad, specific, short, and long keywords you need. You'll show up better in searches when users are looking for content like yours, and it helps ensure that your pin is placed in the right category. These keywords won't show up on promoted pins; they work instead like targeting criteria, matching your content with the people looking for it. Think outside the box. Dollar Shave, for example, recently promoted their razors for Father's Day gifts, and attached a Father's Day keyword even though it's not a direct description of the product. #3: Feature Multiple Products in Single Pins Featuring multiple products in your pins can help them to get more engagement. This tactic can add value to a single pin for two reasons: first, you show users how many amazing things you have to offer; and second, you have a better chance of appealing to more users by featuring more options. You can feature multiple complementary products (like an assembled outfit from your collection) or show multiple uses for a single product (like six types of crafts that use mason jars). Not only does this increase the chance of appealing to more users, but it can also lead to larger sales. #4: Capitalize on Image Height Pinterest's pages are full of vibrant, high-quality, colorful images. So how do you make yours stand out? Image size (or image dimension) matters a great deal. While Pinterest automatically scales all images you upload to match the exact width, you choose the height of your images. Vertical pins (pins that appear taller) perform better on Pinterest. It's recommended that you use image dimensions from about 2:3 and 1.3:5 (with the minimum recommended width being 600 pixels). Note: While you can design pins with the extended dimensions 1.2:8, pins that reach the maximum height don't perform quite as well. #5: Include Text Overlay on Images While descriptions matter, images reign supreme on Pinterest. However, visuals still need a little help sometimes. To catch the attention of users scrolling quickly through feeds, add text overlay directly onto your images to make them stand out and explain why your pin and the content behind it are so valuable. In most cases, text shouldn't make up the majority of the pin. It can, however, be helpful to show off step-by-step tutorials, listicles, or a few words telling pinners what the pin is. Keep the text simple, the phrases short, and all of it easy to read. Bold text can make the description stand out. Plus, make sure the text is strongly contrasting in color from the rest of the image. #6: Choose Light Over Dark Images

Write using themes, not key phrases. How to construct content for people and search engines

by David Rosam @ Writing For SEO

If you’ve read my Writer’s Guide to Semantic Search, you would have seen me recommend we think of themes for pages rather than building them on a number of key phrases. I’ve been asked to say some more about theming and how the two approaches differ. In the dark ages If you remember back more […]

3 Ways to Use Social Media to Increase Your Search Visibility

3 Ways to Use Social Media to Increase Your Search Visibility

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Want to improve your search ranking? Wondering how your social activities can support your SEO? In this article you'll discover three ways social media can improve your visibility in search results. Listen to this article: #1: Dominate Your SERP You probably see SERPs every day without giving them a second thought. Simply put, SERP stands for "search engine results page." Every time you search for a keyword or phrase, the search engine displays a SERP. If you claim your business name on the top social media profiles, it's more likely that you'll "own" the first page of results when people search for you. For example, the SERP from a search for the name "KlientBoost" shows the company's website followed immediately by their profiles on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, and YouTube. KlientBoost owns the search engine results page for their business. To start owning the SERP for your business or brand name, use a service like KnowEm to check for the availability of your business name across popular social media platforms. This makes it easy to reserve your name on as many platforms as possible in a short amount of time. As you claim your social media profiles, you'll need to populate those profiles with your business information, branded images, and links back to your blog or website. While it's true that the links in most social media profiles are "no-follow" (meaning they don't actually pass on authority to your website), these links can help you build trust and credibility in your website's backlink profile with search engines, so make sure to include them. #2: Stand Out Visually With YouTube Video Because most search results are full of text, results that include a video stand out on the page. This means they're likely to gain more clicks even if they place lower on the page. To take advantage of this, create high-quality YouTube videos that answer questions your customers and prospects are likely to ask. Lawn care company LawnStarter posts videos on their YouTube channel that answer common questions people have about maintaining their lawns. The videos are entertaining and stand out in the search results like the one below for the search "how to mow wet grass." #3: Reach Influencers to Support Quality Backlinks When it comes to getting your website or blog to show up in search results for non-branded terms (such as a service you provide), the most influential metric to track is external links to your site. Backlinko analyzed 1 million search results and found that there's a significant correlation between organic search ranking and the number of quality external backlinks. By leveraging social media, you can extend the reach of your content to a larger audience, which will also likely increase the number of clicks and shares it receives. In basic terms, More Shares = More Backlinks = Higher Search Placement. Keep these points in mind to get more visibility and shares for your content: Long-form content gets more shares than short-form content. Having at least one image leads to a dramatic increase in social shares. Lists and infographics get more social shares. To take this one step further, you can pay to promote your content to influencers to generate quality backlinks. Whether you want backlinks from journalists, industry publications, or other influencers, paid campaigns on Twitter will help you get your content in front of them. Why Twitter? A lot of journalists and influencers use it to find trending stories to cover. Putting your best content in front of these people increases the likelihood that they'll use your content in a story. Depending on your business, you can also apply this tactic to Facebook and LinkedIn. Use a tool like BuzzSumo to identify the people who are best positioned to give your content a quality backlink by sharing it or covering it in a story. To get started, log into BuzzSumo and click on Twitter Influencers.

6 Location-based Social Media Monitoring Tools

6 Location-based Social Media Monitoring Tools

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want to reach local customers on social media? Are you monitoring the online conversations near your business? Geo-specific social media monitoring tools help businesses engage with customers who are close to their brick-and-mortar stores. In this article I'll share six location-based monitoring tools to use for local social media marketing. Why Use Location-Based Monitoring Tools? Geo-specific social media monitoring tools are different from the conventional keyword-based monitoring tools in many respects. For one thing, these tools offer a clear picture of what's happening at a particular location, which helps you reach out to local audiences. Plus, they allow you to connect better with your community by engaging with local social media influencers and leveraging local hashtags. Listen to this article: If you do social media for a company with multiple locations, here are some excellent tools to explore. #1: Search Real-time Feeds With Geofeedia Geofeedia allows you to search real-time social feeds by location to discover geolocation social media posts from anywhere worldwide. You also have the ability to monitor multiple locations to archive, curate and share your content. Simply draw a custom perimeter or enter an address on Geofeedia's digital map. It will then display all social content posted by users in that particular area. While the tool searches by location first, you also have the ability to filter your search by keywords, date, time, users and more, across various social media channels including Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Flickr and YouTube. Discover what's trending in an area. Then leverage those trends by including the right keywords and hashtags into your social conversations. Geofeedia offers custom social media monitoring solutions for different industries. The pricing depends on the features you require, as well as the number of locations you want to monitor. #2: Engage and Target Customers With WeLink If you're looking for a cutting-edge social monitoring tool for geo-specificity, WeLink is an excellent option. It lets you engage your potential customers with targeted ads and instant offers on their preferred social media channels. This easy-to-use tool combines keyword-based monitoring with geo-specific listening to offer enterprise-grade location-based social monitoring solutions. The result is a hybrid solution, which uses cellular data mining and WiFi to help you discover and collect all social chatter within your selected area. Gather feeds from all popular social channels using this tool. Use WeLink across various verticals including event management, retail, malls, airlines, hospitality, sports teams and stadiums, schools, security and law enforcement, etc. WeLink offers custom pricing, depending on the features you require. #3: Listen to Trends With Sysomos Sysomos enables you to listen to what's trending locally and understand what your customers are talking about. Use this location-based tool to discover and dig into social content posted by local influencers. Sysomos will gather digital content from popular social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and LinkedIn, as well as posts on blogs and forums. It then collects and displays insightful actionable data in a single platform. Filter digital conversations by both keywords and demographic information. This makes Sysomos particularly beneficial if you're targeting customers within a specific age group or gender, for instance. Discover which topics, trends and brands particularly interest your target audience, and then create marketing campaigns based around these areas. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2DpsHXh5rY Sysomos differs from other location-based social media tools in many ways. For one thing, it collects both real-time and previously posted content on any topic across social networks. Plus, you have the ability to capture the conversations most r...

How to Optimize Your Social Profiles for Search

How to Optimize Your Social Profiles for Search

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Have you thought about optimizing your social accounts for search? Do you know where to use keywords in your social profiles? In social media, there are two search engines you have to optimize for: the search function within each social network and Google search. In this article you'll discover where to use keywords in your social profiles and pages so you are found when people search. Listen to this article: Anatomy of Google Search Results First, take a look at the anatomy of a result in Google Search. There are three things you can usually (but not always) control in Google search results for your website and social profiles and pages: the title, page URL and description. The title is shown first in a search result. This is made up of 50 to 60 characters generally found in the SEO title of a page. The SEO title for Social Media Examiner (as shown in the Google search result above) is: Social Media Examiner: Social media marketing how to, research, case studies, news and more! | Social Media Examiner The URL of the page is shown below the title. On social networks, your URL is usually the social network's domain name followed by your chosen username. The description of the page is shown below the URL. This is the 155 characters generally found in the meta description of the page. The meta description for this website is: Social Media Examiner helps businesses master social media marketing to find leads, increase sales and improve branding using Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest and YouTube For Google search results, also note that Google can only pull information that is available on your public profile. This means you need to log out of each social network completely to see what your profile or page looks like. Anything that isn't publicly viewable won't be indexed by Google. Here's how to use keywords in your social profiles and pages to improve your visibility in search results. #1: Optimize Your Facebook Page When it comes to Facebook pages, you'll see that most pages appear in Google search results like this. Google's search results use the Facebook page name, short description, number of likes and number of people talking about the page. In terms of keyword optimization, Facebook pages with keywords in the page name generally rank higher in Google search, as you can see below in a search for "cars on Facebook." Although Toyota is a top brand for cars, their Facebook page doesn't appear in the first page of search results. Facebook search, on the other hand, uses more than just your page name. When you start a search for "cars," you'll see an option to click on Cars Pages. When you click on Cars Pages, you'll get pages in the Cars subcategory, found under the main brand or product category for pages. If you switch your search term to just the keyword "cars" (without selecting Cars Pages), you have the option to find search results for that keyword under People, Photos, Pages, Places, Groups, Apps and Events. If you're a local business owner, note that your page will appear in Facebook search under Places based on your proximity to the searcher and the category of your page. In this case "car" or "cars" must be in the subcategory. Key takeaway: If you want your page to come up in Google search for a keyword, that keyword needs to be in your page's name. To come up in Facebook search, that keyword needs to be in your page's subcategory. #2: Optimize Your Twitter Profile When it comes to Twitter profiles, you'll see that most profiles appear in Google search results like this: Instead of using the Twitter bio as the meta description for your profile in search results, Google pulls one of your latest tweets along with your profile name, username, number of followers, number of photos and videos and number of tweets. In terms of keyword optimization,

Is Blogging Dead? Building Your Content Home on Rented Land

Is Blogging Dead? Building Your Content Home on Rented Land

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Wondering what the future is for blogs? Is blogging dead? To discover what the future holds for blogging, I interview Mitch Joel and Mark Schaefer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Mitch Joel and Mark Schaefer. Mitch is the president of Mirum, author of CTRL ALT Delete, host of the Six Pixels of Separation podcast and a blogger at TwistImage.com. Mark Schaefer is a marketing consultant, author of The Content Code, co-host of The Marketing Companion podcast and a blogger at businessesGROW.com. Mitch and Mark discuss the premise that blogging as we know it is dead. You'll explore the future of publishing your content on social networks and beyond. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: The Future of Blogging Blogging's evolution Mitch recalls that when blogging first came to be, there wasn't much else. Technology didn't empower us to do things like shoot and post videos immediately, stream online or do podcasts. Back then, even sharing images was pretty difficult. He shares that for him, blogging started to evolve when social media platforms for smaller forms of text-based publishing turned up, like Twitter. Then images and video became easier to publish and share. Mitch says things became very different with Twitter and Facebook status updates. The updates gave people who were writing long-form articles the ability to publish stream of consciousness–style instead. He talks about how this change created a space for platforms like Huffington Post to progress and become more popular with people who wanted to write. While Mitch still looks at his blog as a place for a writer to write, he says it's no longer the primary place for his content. He talks about putting content in places such as Medium, LinkedIn Publisher, Facebook Notes and Harvard Business Review where it might find different audiences. He explains why he'd rather publish directly on these other sites and use them as his distribution platform. Mark thinks blogging will be dead when reading is dead and that there will always be a place for long-form content. He explains why things like podcasts and streaming video are taking some readership away and how smartphones play into that. Mark says that Mitch is onto something in saying what's changing most drastically is not what we're doing, but where. He points out that there are cataclysmic changes in how content is published and consumed and offers the example of Facebook Notes, which encourages people to blog on Facebook. Mark talks about the difference in publishing on Facebook, LinkedIn or other platforms and says the magnet for inbound leads isn't on your website anymore. When discussing the question of what is and isn't a blog, Mitch shares why he's moving away from using that terminology and using words such as article, writer or journalist instead. It's semantics, Mark says, and shares an insight from Tom Webster, his partner on the Marketing Companion podcast. Tom works for Edison Research where they study podcasting a lot. One of the things they found was that people don't know what the word podcast means. Listen to the show to discover what Mark says will happen with storytelling and content marketing in a few years. Building on "rented" land Mitch says it used to be that publishing on social networks was like building your house on rented land, and explains why he doesn't believe it's that way anymore. He shares that it's no longer a sense of rented versus owned; it's a combination that creates a holistic platform.

The Future of Google+, What New Research Reveals

The Future of Google+, What New Research Reveals

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you interested in Google+ marketing? Wondering where the platform is headed? Despite a number of detractors, Google+ has a number of fans and supporters who say Google+ has grown into a platform that wins them business. In this article you'll discover findings from recent studies focused on the current Google+ activity as well as speculation about what Google plans to do with the network. Google+ in Recent History When Google+ first launched, bloggers warned Facebook to watch its rearview mirror for the new, hyper-capitalized social channel. By all accounts, Google leadership designed Google+ as a social media platform, a direct competitor to Facebook. At first, the hype didn't seem hyped enough. Just two weeks after its June 2011 launch, Google+ hit 10 million users. By the end of the year, 90 million users had Google+ accounts. Listen to this article: Compare that surge to Facebook, which took three and a half years to reach 90 million users, and Twitter, which took a little under three years. While it's clear that these two older platforms primed the market for a Google+ launch years later, six months to get that many users is still a rocket-ship trajectory. Google had two more distinct advantages. First, it forced users to sign up for a Google+ account if they wanted to easily use services like YouTube, Photos and Drive. In addition, the year Google+ launched, Google CEO Larry Page tied 25% of all employee bonuses to its success. With a motivated salesforce of 30,000+, you bet word spread. Fast-forward four years to 2015, and we see headlines like Google+ Is Walking Dead, Goodbye Google+, I Wish I Never Knew You, Why Google Is Finally Putting Google+ Out of Its Misery… and a myriad of other posts using words like doomed and ghost town. Digital marketers went back and forth for years about Google+'s ability to attract meaningful activity. Internet marketer Ryan Hanley wrote over a dozen enthusiastic posts about Google+, including this one gushing about the platform’s business pages. In 2015 he published How Perception Became Reality and I Had to Break up with Google+. Hanley makes a credible case here about why he and many other digital marketers had bet that Google+ would be successful: "For what it's worth, I believe the Google+ format is most evolved of all the social networks. First to include streaming video. First to include in-stream GIFs. First to include hovercard functionality. First to include post formatting. First to include varied image sizes." Despite these perks, the return on investment just didn't hold up for Hanley and many others. In the comments on this article, Hanley reveals that he will redirect his time into creating content on his own properties while dialing down time and energy spent on all social media platforms. #1: Google+: Ghost Town or Bustling Suburb? While digital pundits hurl their Google+ prognostications at each other, marketers tread cautiously about where to put their time and dollars. Several robust studies of Google+'s audience, engagement and trajectory provide a snapshot of where Google+ really is right now. International web research company GlobalWebIndex surveyed 83,806 individuals, Internet users ranging in age from 16 to 64, from countries around the world (except China whose policies make it difficult). While 60% of those surveyed claim they have a Google+ profile, only 21% of Internet users self-identify as active users. One may think that the figure of 60% of all Internet users with a Google+ profile should be respected. There are 2.2 billion total Google+ profiles, after all. Even 21% of all Internet users could translate into access to large populations. The problem is that while the other social media channels may have fewer members, these members visit, post and engage at a much higher rate. GlobalWebIndex's numbers indicate that despite the above-mentioned Google+ advantages,

StumbleUpon Marketing: How to Drive More Traffic to Your Content

StumbleUpon Marketing: How to Drive More Traffic to Your Content

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use StumbleUpon for your business? Are you wondering how you can use StumbleUpon to drive more traffic to your content? To learn how your business can benefit from StumbleUpon, I interview Nick Robinson for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Nick Robinson, co-author of StumbleUpon for Dummies. He's also the social media channel manager for SAP Americas. Nick shares how StumbleUpon works and why it's different from other platforms. You'll learn how to use StumbleUpon to discover shareable content and the type of content that works best. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: StumbleUpon Marketing  What makes StumbleUpon different from other social networks Nick explains how StumbleUpon is a content discovery engine. It's a search engine and bookmarking site all in one. It's great if you want to bring exposure to your online content, which can include your website, blog post, video or infographic. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8DtI9e4xZ8 Nick believes that the key differentiator with StumbleUpon is the Stumble button. It takes you directly to a piece of content on another website that you are interested in. You can tell StumbleUpon what your interests are in several ways. When you set up your profile, you can specify your interests, the interests of people you follow and what pieces of content you have given a thumbs-up to on that particular website. When you click the Thumbs-Up or Thumbs-Down button, it tells StumbleUpon's algorithm if it should or shouldn't serve that type of content to you in the future. Each person's StumbleUpon experience is personalized. It allows you to curate content, promote your content and connect with communities with all types of interests. Listen to the show to find out how you can create content that's relevant to an audience within an Interest category. StumbleUpon for B2B and B2C Nick believes that any business in B2B or B2C can use the platform. It all depends on the type of content you produce. The content needs to entertain, be informative and connect with your audience. To be successful, you need to test and measure, based on the changes you learn. StumbleUpon launched their new design and a new mobile app, which has increased its mobile stumbles by 25% over a one-year period. However, the majority of StumbleUpon activity is still primarily desktop, at over 60%. Since these changes were made, around 40% of their activity comes from mobile. In the next couple of years, Nick thinks it will easily overtake desktop. You'll discover as a marketer what you need to consider with these figures in mind. According to Alexa, StumbleUpon is one of the top 149 websites in the world and Quantcast estimated that 23.4 million people in the last month in the U.S. alone have used it. As of June 2013, when the StumbleUpon for Dummies book was published, StumbleUpon had 25 million registered users. They have indexed over 100 million–plus web pages. Listen to the show to find out how much the average user "stumbles" per month and the time spent on the platform. Companies who use StumbleUpon well  Nick says that two companies come to mind, which are both primarily content publishers. The first is Forbes. They do a great job, which is primarily attributable to their company page. They use it to acquire followers and as a content feed. Unfortunately StumbleUpon has closed off access to these pages to the general ...

YouTube Community Development: How to Build a Following With YouTube

YouTube Community Development: How to Build a Following With YouTube

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you create YouTube videos? Want to increase your audience? To learn how to create an online community using YouTube, I interview Tim Schmoyer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Tim Schmoyer, the author of 30 Days to a Better YouTube Channel and The Secret to Building Your YouTube Audience. His site, videocreators.com helps people spread their message via video. Tim explores how to create a community with YouTube. You'll discover how to make videos that will engage your viewers and keep them watching. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. How to subscribe/review on iPhone. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: YouTube Community Development How Tim got involved with YouTube Tim explains how one night in grad school (March 2, 2006), he was bored at home, and decided to check out YouTube. After seeing what was on there, he decided to upload his first video. It was a quick, 30-second video of him talking to the camera. He had no idea where that first experience would lead. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0sbC_K0cCUI As this was pre-Facebook, Tim says he and his girlfriend at the time made videos to show their friends and family what they were up to. They made videos of their dates, engagement and wedding, as well as when they moved, had kids and so on. Tim believes they made about 1,000 videos just sharing their story. It started as a way to communicate with family and friends. Along the way, other people started watching. Around 2009, Tim reached out to Mark Robertson, ReelSEO, and YouTube personality Kevin Nalty, and asked them why certain things did and did not work on YouTube. When they didn't know the answers, Tim decided to figure it out himself. He said he'd report back to them what he learned. Tim began having conversations with people who were trying to figure out the same things about YouTube and audience growth. That was the start of him turning YouTube into his business. A while later, Tim reached out to Mark Robertson again with constructive feedback. Tim told Mark that while he had a great website about video, there was nothing being done with online video. Tim ended up taking over Mark's YouTube channel, and trained the site's viewers how to master YouTube as a platform for audience development. After a few years, Tim started working full time for an animation studio to do audience development for their web series. A year later, after he had grown it to almost 100,000 subscribers, Tim's job was eliminated. However, they paid him full-time for six months to get his own business started. In February 2013, Tim launched his YouTube channel, called Video Creators. By the end of six months, it was his full-time income. Video Creators has three series on it. Every Tuesday, Tim talks about news in the online video industry. Wednesdays, he shares a YouTube tip. Then, on Thursdays he answers a question from his audience. The channel revolves around using online video as a platform to change lives. Without spending any money on promotion, Tim has grown his YouTube channel to over 75,000 subscribers and more than four-million views. He gets tons of interaction and engagement, including about 15,000 comments a month. Listen to the show to learn what YouTube was like in the beginning. Common mistakes with video The biggest mistake Tim sees people make with video is that they treat it like it's the same as television. People new to video (who don't watch YouTube) don't have another frame of reference for how to craft video content. Therefore, they make the same content they would create for television,

How a Blog Launched a Movement: The Vani Hari Story

How a Blog Launched a Movement: The Vani Hari Story

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you have a blog? Want to use your blog to inspire change? This episode explores how a blogger followed her passion and grew a mega following in a few short years. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. Join me as I interview Vani Hari, who is known online as the Food Babe. Her popular blog, FoodBabe.com, focuses on healthy eating. She's built a large platform through articles and videos that investigate unhealthy ingredients in food. Her new book is called The Food Babe Way. In this episode Vani will share how she got started with her blog and built her following. You'll discover how to apply Vani's lessons and journey to your own business blog. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. How to subscribe/review on iPhone. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How a Blog Launched a Movement Vani's story Vani's parents were from India, and moved to the United States right after they married. The first thing Vani's father introduced her mother to was a McDonald's hamburger. Since cows are sacred in India, her mother had never eaten a hamburger before and it was a shock to her system. It turned out American food didn't sit well with Vani's mother, so she just made Indian food at home. However, she let Vani and her brother eat whatever they wanted. Because the siblings wanted to fit in with their neighbors and peers (Indian food looked weird and smelled funny to some of the other kids), they shunned their mother's cooking and asked for fast food and other processed foods. As a result, Vani had a lot of health issues as a child: eczema, asthma, allergies and stomachaches. She didn't tie them to food; she thought they were largely genetic, because her brother also had health issues. Many years later, her health issues caught up with her. Vani was working in a prestigious job for a big-six consulting firm shortly after she graduated from college. She gained over 30 pounds right away (eating catered meals brought into the office and fancy dinners out), and landed in the hospital with appendicitis. Vani didn't look or feel well. It was a major wake-up call. After her recovery, when Vani got back to work, she started to research health and nutrition. She wanted to lose the weight and get healthy. Vani set out to learn about what she was eating; what the ingredients were, why they were in the food and why the food companies were using them. She discovered the chemicals put in food (many of which were invented in the last 50 years or so) were there just to improve the bottom line of the food industry, to figure out how to sell food cheaper by using food-like substances and making them taste like real food. Vani realized the majority of the food she had been eating was processed and had little to no nutrients left in it. The health incident happened 14 years ago and Vani started the blog 4 years ago. The Food Babe Way is all about adopting healthy eating habits. Listen to the show to discover what Vani's aunt told her cousin about Vani's new look. FoodBabe.com Vani says she created the blog because her co-workers and friends asked her to. She explains how she came up with the name. After asking her husband to register the name EatHealthlyLiveForever.com, Vani recalls him saying, "Are you crazy? That's a horrible name. No one's going to remember that." She asked him to come up with something better. A few minutes later, he saw FoodBabe.com was available on auction, and suggested that. At first Vani didn't want to call it Food Babe because for most of her life, she was anything but a food babe. She decided she wouldn't call herself the Food Babe,

How to Generate Revenue With Your Content

How to Generate Revenue With Your Content

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Want to make money from your content? Wondering how a loyal audience can create business opportunities? To explore business models that help publishers generate revenue, I interview Joe Pulizzi. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Joe Pulizzi, founder of the Content Marketing Institute and Content Marketing World. He's written five books including Epic Content Marketing and Content Inc. His newest book is called Killing Marketing: How Innovative Businesses Are Turning Marketing Cost Into Profit. Joe explains how high-quality content can transform marketing from a cost center into a profit center. You'll discover the different ways you can monetize your content. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Generate Revenue With Your Content Why Joe Wrote Killing Marketing Joe and co-author Robert Rose work mostly with large businesses. They've been seeing a trend where businesses are viewing marketing as a profit center rather than a cost center. Only a few companies are currently doing things this way. However, Joe believes that over the next 5 or 10 years, marketing as a profit center will be the rule, not the exception. The premise of the book (and the philosophy) is to create trusted relationships with your audience and monetize that relationship by doing more than selling products. You can monetize your business in 10 different ways. Joe says the biggest mistake people make with their marketing is they set up their marketing department wrong. They seek opportunities for the sales team and don't see all of the potential in what their companies can be and sell. Any business that has lasted 10 or 15 years has evolved over time. Yes, selling products is important but you can't lead product-first anymore. The only competitive advantage people have today is communication. Everything else can be duplicated. Marketers need to be refocusing on making markets and creating opportunities for organizations; however, many have lost sight of those objectives. When the focus is on people, not necessarily products, companies can sell all kinds of things they never thought about before. Listen to the show to discover how marketers typically view marketing. Companies Embracing This Premise BabyCenter.com, owned by Johnson & Johnson, is one of the largest sites dedicated to mothers. Eight out of 10 mothers use the site, which is a stellar resource for research and development. Johnson & Johnson monetizes the site directly and launches new products from it. Red Bull Media House is judged as a profit center and media company. Although they're the marketing arm of Red Bull (and want to sell more product), their revenue comes from advertising and content syndication. They package and sell their videos to companies like The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. They also sell subscriptions (The Red Bulletin Magazine has two million subscribers). One of Joe's favorite examples is Arrow Electronics, which is the 118th company on the Fortune 500 list. They're like the Amazon.com for electronics equipment and they target electrical engineers. Two years ago, they went to Hearst and UBM (Content Marketing Institute's parent company) and bought 51 media properties, including EE Product News. Now, Arrow Electronics is the largest media company in the electronics industry. Although the media division is a marketing arm for the company, the media division is also extremely profitable. Plus, it helps the company sell more products and services. In most cases, marketers simply target customers or prospects with the goal of getting t...

The Art of Story: How to Captivate an Audience

The Art of Story: How to Captivate an Audience

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you give presentations or speak to clients? Want to illustrate your knowledge with better stories? To discover how to improve your stories, and your storytelling, I interview Michael Port. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Michael Port, the author of NYT best seller: Book Yourself Solid. He also teaches workshops called Heroic Public Speaking, where he applies the craft of acting to public speaking. His latest book is Steal the Show: From Speeches to Job Interviews to Deal-Closing Pitches. Michael will explore how to find, use and create stories in your marketing. You'll discover tips to improve the delivery of your stories. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: The Art of Story Michael's story Michael shares how he started his career as an actor. He has a master from the graduate acting program at New York University. Michael worked professionally on the shows Sex and the City, Third Watch, All My Children, Law & Order and 100 Center Street, as well as in the films The Pelican Brief, Down to Earth and The Believer. He earned a living doing commercial voice overs for companies including AT&T, Pizza Hut, Braun, Coors Beer, MTV and others. After he left acting, Michael says he decided to talk his way into a job for which he was completely unqualified. He pitched himself, got the job and worked his way up in the fitness industry on the business side. He credits his post-acting success to being an actor, as he was able to perform during life's high-stakes situations. When the spotlight and eyes are on you, the way you perform will determine the quality of your life, Michael says. After Michael left the fitness industry, he went into consulting for businesses and started writing books, and he saw it more and more. Over the last 13 years, Michael realized he had to meld his experience and training as an actor, his experience as a professional keynoter and what he knows about the business world. That's what Steal the Show is about, Michael says. Half the book is on the techniques associated with being a great public speaker and the other half is focused on performing during life's everyday situations. Listen to the show to learn more about how Michael coaches speakers, as well as why he originally resisted helping people with their public speaking. Why people love stories People love narrative, wonder and imagination, Michael says. Stories can get us out of our own head and into another world. We turn everything into a story, he continues. Politics, religion, love, our success or our failures become stories. Sometimes the stories we tell actually get in our way and sometimes they can change the world. Michael talks about a researcher named Jonathan Gottschall, who studies the neuroscience behind stories. Jonathan says the constant firing of our neurons in response to fictional stimuli strengthens and refines the neural pathways that lead to skillful navigation of life's problems. Listen to the show to discover in what way projects are stories. How to find your stories People sometimes draw a blank when they start to work on a presentation or prepare for an upcoming meeting, because so many things have happened over the years. Those experiences and stories are not top of mind, since you are more likely thinking about today and tomorrow. There are four different prompters for the discovery part of the process. Take a piece of paper and write out four columns, one for each of these categories. Then, when you go to craft a speech or presentation for a sales pitch,

Live Video and Marketing: Where the Industry Is Heading

Live Video and Marketing: Where the Industry Is Heading

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Interested in using live video for business? Have you considered creating a live video show? To find out what live video can do for your business, I interview Brian Fanzo. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Brian Fanzo, a tech evangelist who specializes in live video. He's the founder of iSocialFanz and host of the FOMOFanz podcast. Brian explores live video, where it's headed, and how it can help your business. You'll discover whether to use Facebook Live or Periscope if you're just getting started. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Live Video and Marketing What Live Video Means for Business Whether yours is a small business, a brick-and-mortar store, or an ecommerce company, you need to shrink the distance between yourself and your customer, Brian explains. Live video is much more than a marketing play because it shrinks that distance by humanizing your brand and business. Live video is also the gateway to technologies such as augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR), which Brian believes will be huge by 2020. To embrace AR and VR, he says, companies and brands will need to have a live video strategy already in place. He says today's consumers want you to convince them that you can be trusted, that you're a resource, are invested in them, and can understand them. They don't want to be marketed or sold to; they want to engage and have a conversation with you. Businesses need to spend time building rapport, a relationship, and trust with their audience, and live video is a great vehicle for that. With regard to building trust, Brian believes the most valuable statement anyone can make on live video is, "I don't know." If a brand admits they don't know something on live video, it adds validity to what they do know. (When you're stumped, you can also ask audience members to send you a message on Twitter or Facebook, and say you'll have your product manager get back to them.) Listen to the show to hear more about the strategy behind using live video to break down barriers with your audience. Getting Started With Live Video Brian says that according to Cisco, 79% of Internet traffic in 2020 will be video. Nowhere did anyone say that's going to be great video, good video, or live video, Brian continues. However, he believes most brands are thinking about video. Many people think live video is scary because they picture themselves on the video. Brian has to remind them that the best live videos are often made when you're celebrating customers and employees. And if your live video brings people access they can't get anywhere else, the camera doesn't even need to be on you. For example, say you use live video to interview a client, a customer, or a celebrity while they're in the office. As the person behind the camera, you can watch the comments for questions and decide which are important enough to ask the guest. With these kinds of live videos, all of the scary elements of being on air are taken away. Listen to the show to discover my process for doing live videos. Innovative Examples of Live Video Brian says Cisco has done an amazing job with their We Are Cisco campaign. Employees in different offices are trusted to take over the company's social media accounts, including Snapchat and Instagram, to share their point of view. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMjEzVH1d0k Not only does the campaign celebrate Cisco's employees, it's also a great recruiting tool. The company doesn't have to convince job applicants that they trust their employees; the proof is v...

Social Media Visuals: How to Easily Create Visuals Without a Designer

Social Media Visuals: How to Easily Create Visuals Without a Designer

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use visuals in your social media? Want tools and tips to help you create images? To discover how to create great social media visuals when you're not a designer, I interview Donna Moritz. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Donna Moritz. Donna is a visual marketing expert, and her blog Socially Sorted was recognized as one of Social Media Examiner's Top 10 Social Media Blogs in 2015 and 2016. Donna will share why social media marketers should care about visuals. You'll discover what to consider before you design images for social media and learn about new tools to help you. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Social Media Visuals Why care about visuals? Because the news feed is so busy these days, Donna explains, marketers need to do everything they can to capture attention. She says visuals catch that attention and typically drive users to take some sort of action because visuals support an emotional connection. Donna points out that the fastest-growing channels such as Periscope and Snapchat are highly focused on visual content, as are Instagram and Pinterest. She also notes that traditional platforms Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter are giving more attention to visual content and users are 44% more likely to engage with content that contains pictures. Video is also on the rise, Donna adds. Socialbakers research shows that brands are now uploading more video directly to Facebook than YouTube, and about 80% of all video engagement is coming from Facebook native video. And that's before Facebook Live is really being measured. Plus, she says, 110 years of video footage is watched on Periscope every day. According to the Content Marketing Institute, out of a range of priorities for content creators, visual content is in the top three. Visual content is a very important topic because it works. Marketers just need to find out where to start and how to produce and use images efficiently. Listen to the show to discover the current standard image format and how image sizes have changed. Getting started with images Before you start to design images, Donna says you need to think about what types of visual content get shared well on which platforms. Content that's effective on Facebook might be different from what works on Instagram, which might be different from Twitter. She's seen people get overwhelmed trying to do visual content on every platform, and advises that it's better to focus on visuals for one particular platform at a time. She also cautions that you shouldn't jump into visuals on a new platform until you have systems in place for visuals on the one before it. Donna shares her Visual Content Blueprint, which is five elements to help you create images that work. First, decide what the image is going to be in regards to what works on the targeted platform (more on this later). Then consider the call to action. It could be asking for more connection or engagement (likes or comments), driving more shares or click-throughs, or a combination. Next, think about your landing content (where people arrive when they click through or share). Will people get more information, blog content, a free download, or something else of value? After that, make sure users are achieving some sort of goal. Do you want them to sign up for something, read a blog post, or stay on your website? Donna recommends that every image be able to stand alone. That way, if something is pinned or shared out of context, people will still understand what you're offering and how to get it.

Social CRM: How Marketing Can Benefit From Social Media and CRM

Social CRM: How Marketing Can Benefit From Social Media and CRM

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you want to know more about your customers and prospects so you can serve them better? Are you wondering what social CRM is and how your business can benefit from it? To learn how social CRM can help marketers, I interview Kyle Lacy for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Kyle Lacy, director of global content marketing and research at Salesforce ExactTarget Marketing Cloud. He's authored numerous books, including Twitter Marketing for Dummies and Social CRM for Dummies. Kyle shares why social CRM is important for marketers. You'll discover some of the best CRM solutions available, what their basic functions are and how social CRM can help with social media ROI. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Social CRM The difference between customer relationship management (CRM) and social CRM Kyle states that customer relationship management (CRM) and social CRM are combining. CRM manages all of your customers' data, and when you add the word social, it takes in all of the social data too. Whether you want to sell to customers or retain them, social CRM just adds those social data points. This can be a Facebook profile, Twitter account, etc.—basically anything that has to do with social media. It's the ability to manage all of your data points around the customer within a single software source. Listen to the show to find out why Kyle doesn't distinguish between the two. The definition of CRM systems Kyle explains that a CRM system is software that allows you to manage every single touchpoint you have with your customers. For example, their email address, what they bought previously from you, their Twitter handle, and so forth. It's really based on what level of business you have. So if you're an enterprise company, then the CRM solution would be Salesforce. However, if you're a smaller company, Nimble would be a great alternative. CRM systems are anything to do with a customer interaction. This can be either in a store or online. Listen to the show to discover why these people aren't just customers, but prospects too. Why social CRM is important for marketers Kyle refers to Mary Meeker's State of the Internet report that was released at the end of May this year. He thinks that we have reached a point where social media has hit maturity, and for us to realize the true value of it, we have to be able to connect it to our customers who are already in our systems. For example, if a retailer has 1000 customers within their CRM solution, they need to be able to find the social pieces of data that connect them to these existing customers. As a business, you want to turn these customers into advocates. To do this, you need to manage your data around the customer. Kyle believes that from a social standpoint, it allows you to recognize the true value of social and you can use it to communicate more effectively. You'll discover how you can drive more sales when you combine customer email addresses with their social networks. One of the biggest things that Kyle sees right now is marketers who use the one-click sign-on using Facebook on their website. When a customer visits your website and signs in through Facebook, you get all that customer's information. There is so much data you can pull when you connect with customers on a social network. Listen to the show to find out how social CRM can improve your advertising effectiveness while reducing your customer servic...

Easy Search Engine Optimization Anyone Can Do

by Michael Martinez @ SEO Theory

It’s hard to write an article like this without talking about the need for SEO industry standards or pointing out the immense competition among SEO consultants, agencies, tool providers, and (e)book authors for your business dollars.  So I will begin…

How to Boost Your Facebook Ad Visibility

How to Boost Your Facebook Ad Visibility

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you use Facebook ads to promote your business? Are you struggling to connect with your audience? By fine-tuning your Facebook ads, you can capture the attention of both customers and prospects. In this article you'll discover how to boost the visibility of your Facebook ads. Listen to this article: #1: Use a Clutter-Free Image With Minimal Text The image you choose for your ad depends on what business you're in and whom you're targeting. If you're a personal brand, you may want to choose a picture of yourself, because a friendly face can improve the performance of your ad. It's also possible to get good results with images that show a product or something else that's relevant to what you're advertising. When choosing an image, make sure that it isn't too busy or cluttered. And avoid using an image that has Facebook's shade of blue because people may dismiss your ad, thinking it has something to do with Facebook. It's also helpful to add a border around your image. Keep images text-free, or use a very small amount of text. Facebook has implemented a 20% rule for text in an ad image, which means text can cover no more than 20% of the image. In a tiny ad on the sidebar of a page, a lot of text on an image wouldn't be legible anyway. #2: Write Short, Attention-Grabbing Copy Your ad copy should be short and enticing and grab the user's attention immediately. Spend some time coming up with your ad copy. Facebook suggests you include a timeframe and a price (when appropriate) and stick to one call to action. You can create multiple ads with different text. Then test them to see which gets the most engagement. There are two distinct components to the ad copy: the headline and the text. In the news feed, the ad's headline (which is clickable) appears under the picture, and in the sidebar, it appears before the text copy. Try to keep the headline to a single line in the ad. The text copy sits above the image in the news feed or under the headline in the sidebar. Keep the text short enough that the person viewing the ad won't have to click the See More button. #3: Explore Audience Targeting When you're targeting an audience for your ad, don't just type in male/female, 30 to 40 years old, in a certain city and hope for the best. It's important to know who your customers are so you can drill down and segment accordingly. Target the people you want to be connected to you and your brand. For example, if you're advertising something that people can buy, you might want to target those who have bought from you before or expressed an interest in buying at some time. When creating your ad, always choose the location, age, gender and interests you're targeting. Most people won't list their job title or very personal details on their Facebook profile, so you can leave these details out. Target interests by specifying the pages that your ideal customer likes. You can target your direct competitors' pages. For example, if you're a photographer in Toronto, target the followers of the page of a competing photographer in the area. You might also want to target the pages of businesses whose products and services are complementary to yours. These people likely have the same customers as you. For example, if you're a web designer, target people who like the pages of a particular copywriter. Look at the profiles of people who like your page and see what other pages they like. You'll probably find common likes among your fans. Make sure that you target the actual pages, which show up in Interests, rather than the interests themselves. Note that there seems to be no real rhyme or reason to the pages that Facebook pulls up in the Interests section. You may enter the name of a page that has over 20,000 likes, and Facebook won't find it, but one with 2,000 likes may show up if you search for it. This is something you'll have to test for yourself when choosing page...

7 Ways to Track Your Social Media Marketing Activities

7 Ways to Track Your Social Media Marketing Activities

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you tracking your social media marketing results? Do you know where to find metrics to help you improve? Tracking social activity helps you attract a higher-quality following, communicate more effectively and provide content that resonates with your audience. In this article you’ll discover seven ways to track metrics and improve your social media marketing. Listen to this article: #1: Discover Optimal Times to Post Use a tool like SumAll to track metrics such as what times of the day you get the most engagement and which content types work best for your social posts. As you gather these insights, start scheduling your posts at optimal times. Make other changes as well, such as a different content type or voice, to connect with and grow your audience. #2: Examine the Reach of a Keyword on Twitter To track the reach of a specific keyword or hashtag on Twitter, use a tool like TweetReach. For example, if you're running a campaign with an associated hashtag, you can determine how far your hashtag traveled over a given time frame. TweetReach's free service will look at 1,500 tweets for a given keyword. For example, below are the results for a search for the hashtag #MondayBlogs. The results show that the term had a reach of nearly 211,000 accounts. TweetReach also shows you the most influential accounts that help spread your message and makes it easy for you to engage with them. With the premium service, you can track a hashtag over weeks or months to see how your campaign is spreading on Twitter. #3: Research Your Competition If you want to know where your competitors excel and where they're falling short on social, use a tool like Rival IQ to find out. Why is this good to know? If your competitors are tanking on Snapchat, for example, chances are you will too. Or if your competitors aren't on Snapchat, it might be worth a look to see why. Maybe they were on the platform previously and it didn't work out, or perhaps it's just a venue they haven't explored yet. A recent blog post from Rival IQ reveals engagement rates for Shopify and their competitors, complete with detailed graphics showing where each company has a social presence and where they get the most interaction. You may find some of the results surprising. For example, Shopify gets the most engagement on Instagram. That's probably not the first place you'd think people would go for an ecommerce solution, but Shopify is connecting well there. #4: Identify Industry Influencers Use a tool like BuzzSumo to identify who the influencers are in your field and what they're talking about. Then connect with those people, talk to them and make sure you're responding to them when they tweet you. Beyond that, you can use BuzzSumo to find out which posts are getting the most action, discover relevant keywords you may have been unaware of and find new Twitter chats to participate in. You can also see who shared the best content so you can target your following habits in the hope that they'll follow you back. Filter your results if you want to see what video is performing best or for details on infographics, for example. You can go back for a year, which is particularly useful if you have season-specific content. All in all, BuzzSumo gives you insights on how to word your posts and whom to engage with for growth on which social platform. It's a great tool for fine-tuning how you present your content on social media. Check out how your own posts rank to make sure that you're improving over time. #5: Determine Website Traffic Sources With a customized landing page, you can measure many metrics, the most basic of which is just where website traffic is coming from. Say you're spending 10 hours a week crafting Twitter posts because you're certain that your audience is there. If you then discover that your Facebook landing page is driving more traffic, you can streamline your efforts either by reducing the...

How to Create a Snapchat Geofilter for Your Event

How to Create a Snapchat Geofilter for Your Event

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Have you heard of Snapchat geofilters? Want to use them to promote an event or your business? Snapchat On-Demand Geofilters let you design custom filters people can use on their snaps based on a custom location you define. In this article I'll explain how to create two types of Snapchat On-Demand Geofilters and explore several ways marketers can use them for business. About On-Demand Geofilters for People and Businesses Snapchat offers two types of On-Demand Geofilters: one type for people and one for businesses. The area for on-demand geofilters must be between 20,000 and 5 million square feet and they cannot be active for more than 30 days. Listen to this article: In Snapchat's submission guidelines, the distinction is that On-Demand Geofilters for people cannot include any branding, business marks, business names, business logos, or other promotional content for a business or brand. They're meant to be used for birthday parties, graduations, and other personal celebrations. On-Demand Geofilters for businesses, on the other hand, are those that promote brands or businesses and must include a business name, which will be shown to let Snapchat users know that your business submitted the filter. On-Demand Geofilters for businesses can use branding, business marks, business names, business logos, or other promotional content for a business or brand. They cannot, however, use photographs of people, URLs, phone numbers, emails, drug-related content, or content that you don't own or have the authorization to use. The content in any On-Demand Geofilter must also adhere to all of Snapchat's Terms of Services, Advertising Policies, Privacy Policies, Community Guidelines, and other On-Demand Geofilter Terms and Conditions. How to Create On-Demand Geofilters for Snapchat To get started, you'll need to go to the On-Demand Geofilters page and click on the Create Now button. You'll be asked to log into your Snapchat account. Then you'll be given the option to download templates for your On-Demand Geofilter and to read the submission guidelines. The templates provided by Snapchat are offered in both PSD and AI format. You can use these templates to quickly create your On-Demand Geofilters if you have Adobe Photoshop or Adobe Illustrator. You need to create a PNG file that is 1,080px wide by 1,920px tall with a transparent background that is under 300KB in file size. You can do this without Photoshop or Illustrator. For example, let's say that you wanted to create the image in Canva. You would use the Custom Dimensions option to create an image that is exactly 1,080px wide by 1,920px tall. I could add a shape at the bottom to create a banner effect. Then add text or upload a logo. You can download the image as a PNG file. Then open the PNG file in GIMP and use the Select by Color option to select the white area of the image. Then use the Color to Alpha option to take the white selection and make it transparent. Overwrite the PNG file you downloaded, creating a geofilter with a transparent PNG background that's under 300KB in file size. When you upload the file to Snapchat, you'll see a preview of what it would look like as an On-Demand Geofilter. This will allow you to edit your file accordingly until you get it just the way you want it. When your design is finished, click Next to choose the dates you'd like your On-Demand Geofilter to be active. Then you choose the area Snapchat users must be in to use your On-Demand Geofilter. You'll then draw a geofence around your precise location. This fence must be a minimum of 20,000 square feet. At this stage, you'll get a pricing estimate based on the size of your fence and the date range you've selected. On the final screen, you can confirm your order details including payment information and choose whether your On-Demand Geofilter is personal or business.

Failure: Why Taking Risks and Failing Is the Path to Success

Failure: Why Taking Risks and Failing Is the Path to Success

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Have you experienced a failure in your business (or your life)? Would you like to discover how to turn failures into success and real growth? For this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast, I'll explore why failure is important and the lessons I've learned from a major failure that happened to me this year. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. You'll discover the importance of failure in your work and your life, reasons you should embrace failure, and how the lessons and discoveries you make can help you succeed. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Embracing Failure Why a show on failure? As C.S. Lewis said, "Failures are finger posts on the road to achievement." As we fail, we are pointed in a direction. We learn a lot from failures because they can help us get better. We focus so much on success stories and what works that we often overlook the unmentioned road of failure, challenges, errors and mistakes that inevitably led to every single one of those success stories. In 2014, I had a really big failure. In fact, it was my biggest failure ever. Many people don't know about it and this show is the first time I've spoken about it publicly. I would like to share what went wrong, the lessons I learned and the importance of failure to your business, marketing and life. Listen to the show to hear why failure is so important to your business and life. The importance of failure and reasons to embrace it Henry Ford offers this great quote: "The only real mistake is the one from which we learn nothing." The path that we go down is meant to have challenges and mistakes. It's what strengthens us and makes us better. Here are three reasons you should embrace failure: 1. It's part of the entrepreneur's journey. Whether or not you consider yourself an entrepreneur or business owner, this lesson applies to everyone. Nearly every definition of "entrepreneur" focuses on the word risk. Risk is at the core of all business breakthroughs and success. With risk comes failure. It's inevitable and it's okay. 2. Nothing ventured. Nothing gained. If you're not willing to float a new idea for your company, experiment with your marketing or launch a new venture, the opportunity that sits in front of that idea will never manifest. It will never come true. You'll never really grow. Social Media Examiner is my third major business venture in the last 18 years. It followed a design agency and a white paper writing consultancy, both of which were very successful and have since shut down. In 2009, I started the media company which you now know as Social Media Examiner. Along the way, I tried and failed at a lot of things. You'll hear four examples of my terrible failures, and why I didn't let these failures stop me or get me down. 3. New discoveries are born in the ashes of failure. The most important reason to embrace failure is that it makes way for new opportunities to grow into awesome things. There's no better time than right after you crash and burn to reflect on what you've done wrong and really learn from it. I love this quote from Zig Ziglar: "It's not how far you fall, but how high you bounce that counts." You have to try, experiment, fail and do it over and over again. In summary, failure is a necessary part of the process of making new discoveries. Listen to the show to discover how two of America's most famous businessmen never gave up on their discoveries and why their persistence paid off. My story In July 2013, I launched My Kids' Adventures,

How to Use Facebook to Market Your Products

How to Use Facebook to Market Your Products

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you have products to sell? Have you tried using Facebook ads to promote your products? To find out how to market products via Facebook, I interview Steve Chou. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Steve Chou. Steve and his wife run an ecommerce site that sells handkerchiefs and linens at BumblebeeLinens.com. He's also host of the My Wife Quit Her Job podcast and the website MyWifeQuitHerJob.com, where he teaches people how to sell physical products online. Steve explains which Facebook ad types he uses to sell his physical products. You'll discover how Steve uses email and Facebook ads in tandem. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Use Facebook to Market Physical Products Steve's Story As Steve and his wife were preparing for their wedding, his wife wanted a nice handkerchief because she expected to cry during the service. After shopping around, they imported a bunch of handkerchiefs from Asia. After using only a few, Steve and his wife listed the rest on eBay, where they sold like hotcakes. Later, when Steve's wife became pregnant with their first child, she wanted to quit her six-figure income job. They reconnected with the handkerchief vendor and opened their online store, Bumblebee Linens. At first, Steve worked as a microprocessor designer by day, and after the baby went to bed, Steve and his wife ran the business. It became such a success that they maintained their income even after his wife quit her job. Steve explains that soon afterward, their friends began wanting to have kids and quit their jobs, and they kept asking Steve how to launch an ecommerce store. Instead of answering the same questions over and over again, Steve began blogging about his experiences running the store. That's how MyWifeQuitHerJob.com got started in 2009. To generate sales in the early days, Steve used Google AdWords. His brother-in-law worked at Google in the AdWords division and showed Steve how to use it. Back in 2007, Steve generated a lot of sales via clicks that cost him about 10 to 15 cents. Steve says online content also helped generate sales. They wrote articles to help brides and provide craft ideas for their products. After three to six months, the articles started ranking in search engines and sent traffic to their store, too. Today, Bumblebee Linens sells handkerchiefs, linen napkins, linen towels, lace parasols, aprons, and more. Steve says the store has several target audiences. The handkerchief audience includes people planning weddings and an over-55 crowd. Event and wedding planners are the target audience for napkins and moms are the audience for Mommy & Me aprons. The company has in-house embroidery machines for personalizing their products. Listen to the show to learn more about the audience and the content on MyWifeQuitHerJob.com. Win-back Campaigns Steve explains that a win-back campaign targets people who have already purchased from your shop because those people are more likely to buy again. To run this type of campaign, you need to figure out who those people are, and if they haven't purchased within a certain timeframe, give them an incentive to come back. You can automate a win-back campaign with an online merchant system. For example, if someone hasn't purchased from Bumblebee Linens in 60 days, they automatically receive an email and a Facebook ad with a 10%-off coupon. To automate the Facebook component of the campaign, Steve says the ecommerce system Klaviyo allows Bumblebee Linens to export a specific segment (in this case people who haven...

How to Use Trello to Manage Your Facebook Group Posts

How to Use Trello to Manage Your Facebook Group Posts

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you active in Facebook groups? Looking for a better way to organize the content you share in those groups? Managing your content in Trello lets you spend less time figuring out what to share in Facebook groups and more time engaging with fellow members. In this article you'll discover how to use Trello to manage the content you share in Facebook groups. Listen to this article: #1: Prioritize and Organize Your Facebook Groups No matter what tool you use, trying to manage 25 or more Facebook groups is going to be overwhelming. The trick is to know which groups best serve your goals and which groups you can best serve. If you're considering a new Facebook group, give it a 14-30 day trial. During that time, you'll get a feel for the types of content shared in the group. Also pay attention to the other members, so you can decide whether the audience aligns with your ideal prospects. #2: Create a Trello Board After you've made a decision about which groups you want to manage in Trello, the next step is to create and name a Trello board (maybe something like "Facebook Group Management"). You'll want to organize your Facebook groups by making a label for each one. I suggest you use a color-coded system to help you remember what types of content you can share in each group. For example, some groups have specific promotion or engagement rules and others simply have a niche focus. Perhaps you could use red hues to denote groups that prohibit promotion and green hues to denote groups that allow promotion. Whatever system you choose, knowing the slant you want to give your content will be easier if you know where you're sharing it at a glance. Using these labels will also make it easy to see where you've shared a piece of content in the past. This goes a long way toward helping you avoid duplicating content in the same group, and making sure you don't accidentally copy and paste the same content, with no alterations, into several different groups. #3: Make Lists for Your Content Topics Now it's time to add a list for each type of content you'll share in your groups; later on, in step 4, you'll add cards for specific pieces of content. For example, you might create lists for promotions of a membership site, a podcast, freebies you offer, and webinars you host. You should also have lists for Q&A prompts, tips and tricks, inspiration, and funny off-topic stuff. I even keep a column for introductions with a few variations that I can use (and tweak if necessary) as I join new groups. Create as many lists as you need and make sure every content topic has its own list on your Trello board. #4: Fill Your Lists With Pre-written Posts Spend time creating the text for 8 to 10 posts for each of your content lists. This step takes the longest, but doing the work up front means you'll have more time for engaging in groups later. Remember, you'll likely share each of these posts in a number of Facebook groups on different days and at different times, so don't worry if they sound similar. A great way to find inspiration for these post cards is to look at your past blog content and craft Facebook posts around that content. Use some of your posts to link back to that content on your blog, but in others simply provide value with a tip from the original blog post. You'll also want to have any images or graphics on hand so you can easily attach them to the appropriate card. When you have all of your copy and graphics ready to go, it's time to fill each list with cards of your posts. Start with your first list and click on the Add a card link at the bottom of the list. Title the card with the full copy of the post so you can see exactly which posts are available in each list. When you've added the title, click the green Add button. If you prefer a cleaner layout that allows you to see more cards at one time, you can title the card and add the full text of your post in the card...

Snapchat Gains Momentum: New Research

Snapchat Gains Momentum: New Research

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you adding Snapchat to your social media marketing? Wondering what Snapchat's audience responds to? In this article you'll discover recent insights on Snapchat and how marketers can use the platform to reach targeted audiences with ads and other content. Listen to this article: #1: Snapchat Nears Facebook Levels for Daily Video Views In January 2016, Bloomberg News reported that Snapchat now delivers more than 7 billion videos to users each day. The news is amazing for two reasons. First, previously reported numbers of Snapchat daily video views in September 2015 was 4 billion. A leap of nearly 50% in just three or four months is certainly newsworthy. Second, Facebook reported 8 billion video views daily in October 2015. Considering that at 1.55 billion users, Facebook's audience outstrips Snapchat's by 15 times, it's clear video is Snapchat's primary content form. Key Takeaway: Snapchat's 7 billion daily video views figure is important because mobile video is rapidly gaining favor with advertisers. According to eMarketer, companies spent $7.46 billion on digital video ads in the U.S. in 2015, an increase of 42% from the year before. eMarketer also relates that in the United States, mobile video ad spend is growing faster than all other digital advertising tactics. Marketers with a video strategy in place can easily adapt their tactics to reach Snapchat's video-friendly demographic. #2: Vertical Video Rising in Popularity When Snapchat emerged on the scene, some industry pundits criticized its vertical-only display as too limiting and unfamiliar for those used to more horizontal television and movie screens. Now, after five years in business, Snapchat reviewed its own internal data to find that users are more likely to watch a vertical video than a horizontal video until the end. In some instances, the vertical video had a completion rate nine times higher than its horizontal counterpart. Minutes spent on vertical screens have increasingly been edging out those spent on horizontal screens since 2011. Key Takeaway: Of course the consumer who views a mobile video until the end is more likely to respond to the call to action. Marketers will appreciate this finding because they typically put their strongest call to action at the end. It's also worth mentioning that if Snapchat's findings are correct, it's possible that although video consumers are accustomed to videos being horizontal, they're more accustomed to their phones being vertical and staying that way should a text or call come in. Marketers should consider testing response to their own video to see which orientation their followers prefer. #3: Snapchat Users Are Engaged Every day, between 300 and 350 million photos are uploaded to Facebook. With an audience of 1.59 billion and 1.04 billion monthly active users, the portion of the audience participating by uploading photos is less than 35%. In comparison, 65% of Snapchat users upload their own photos daily. They're engaged with the platform, viewing it as an extension of their own personal brand rather than just a place to passively receive information. (Read how Facebook and Twitter users now regard those channels as news outlets.) One of Snapchat's primary sales points is frequency of use. Its 100 million users visit the platform daily. Facebook started measuring their monthly active users (MAU), implying that the number of people going to the channel even once every 30 days constituted success. Snapchat founder Evan Spiegel scoffs at that metric, stating the time frame is far too long and not much to boast about. The numbers his company measures focus on daily activity. Key Takeaway: Engagement is such a sought-after metric because marketers know that those who are interacting with a company are far more likely to share and talk up its posts, offers and products. The engaged consumer uses the company to build a portion of his or her identity....

How to Use Promoted Pins on Pinterest

How to Use Promoted Pins on Pinterest

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Want to get your pins in front of customers? Have you considered using promoted pins? Pinterest promoted pins can help you drive referral traffic and increase sales. In this article you'll discover how to create promoted pins on Pinterest. Listen to this article: Why Promoted Pins? Pinterest's promoted pins, which are now available to all businesses, are designed to increase visibility to a targeted audience. They help you get your products or location in front of people who are far along in the buying process and ready to make a purchase. Promoted pins are searchable, so you can add keywords to connect with users who are searching for content like yours. With promoted pins, you're paying to have your pins placed where users are most likely to notice and interact with them. The promoted pins that users see are based on their interests and activity on the site. Users can't turn off promoted pins, but they can hide specific promoted pins that they don't like. Here's how to get started with promoted pins for your business. #1: Understand Campaign Objectives Just like with other types of social media ads, you can run promoted pin campaigns based on specific goals and objectives. There are three objectives you can choose from: Engagement: Get engagement on your pins, such as repins, clicks, and close-up views of your pins. You pay per action taken. Traffic: Send traffic to your website when users click through your pins. In this case, you pay per click to your site. Awareness: Use promoted pins to introduce and expose your brand to a relevant audience. Awareness pins are currently available only to Fortune 500 companies who have a minimum monthly ad spend, but that may change in the future. Promoted pins, like other social media ads, work on a bid system, so keep this in mind when setting your budget. #2: Create a Promoted Pin To create and use Pinterest's promoted pins, you need to have a business account. If you don't already have one, you can either create a new account or convert your current Pinterest profile to a business account. Once your account is set up and ready to go, hover over Ads at the top left of the Pinterest home page and select Overview. You see an ads dashboard similar to Facebook's Ads Manager, where you can review and create new Pinterest ad campaigns. This article walks you through how to create an engagement promoted pin, but traffic promoted pins work exactly the same way. From the Ads Manager, click on the Promote button next to Engagement Campaigns. Next, select Boost Engagement With Your Pins. If you want a traffic campaign, you'd choose Get Traffic to Your Website. On the next page, name your campaign, select a start and end date (the end date is optional), and choose a daily budget. I recommend setting an end date, since you can only have daily budgets instead of lifetime budgets. If you don't set an end date, make sure you keep an eye on the campaign so you don't spend more than you intended. After you click Pick a Pin, you'll see a list of your pins. Select the pin you want to use for your campaign. If you want, you can search for a pin using the search box, or view the pin that's been most clicked or the most repinned in the past 30 days. After you select your pin, enter a name for your promoted pin and set a destination URL. Make sure that the URL goes to the specific page where you want users to land, not a generic homepage. In the next section, select relevant topics that will help you reach your target audience in their home feeds. You want your pin to be placed in the right Pinterest categories so users come across it while browsing. Make sure to choose only relevant interests for your pin, not random interests your audience might have (as you might do on Facebook). This step is about pin placement, so it needs to be accurate. Next,

Customer Advocacy: How to Get People to Talk About Your Company

Customer Advocacy: How to Get People to Talk About Your Company

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Are your customers advocates for your brand or business? Want to improve customer satisfaction and advocacy? To find out how to turn customers into advocates, I interview Joey Coleman. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. Joey Coleman joins us today. He's a customer advocacy consultant and coach who has worked with Hyatt Hotels, NASA, and Zappos. Joey's also a frequent keynote speaker and leads workshops on the customer experience and the customer journey. Joey explores what it takes to turn a customer into an advocate. You'll discover the phases that lead to advocacy. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Customer Advocacy Joey's Story Joey has had an eclectic career. After college and law school, he did business consulting before working as a criminal defense attorney in the courtroom for many years. Then he taught executive education courses and ran a division of a promotional products company. About 15 years ago, Joey started his own brand experience and design firm. This led him to speak on stages all over the world, talking about how to create remarkable experiences that take someone from being a one-time customer to a customer for life. In each of his careers, Joey says, success hinged on two things. First, an understanding of human psychology (why people believe what they believe and why they do the things they do). And second, an ability to use that understanding to persuade people to take a certain course of action, whether it's a sales pitch, brochure, website, infographic, piece of evidence introduced in the courtroom, or a closing argument. Looking back, his entire career has been all about the experience; meaning the experience someone is currently having and how to make it better. While marketing firms build ad campaigns, branding agencies design logos, and graphic design firms execute the visuals, Joey looks at brand experience and how all of the different elements of a business work together. Experience is the through-line that connects everything. Listen to the show to discover how the name of Joey's business, Design Symphony, represents brand experience. Why Customer Advocacy Matters Joey thinks customer advocacy is really the end goal for most organizations. It happens when you reach the point where your customers are such big believers in who you are and what you do that they become your external sales force. Customers drive new business and increase the amount of business they do with you because they've become such raving fans, they can't help themselves. They advocate zealously for you and your business. Joey shares a brief overview of the history of business. In the 1980s, he explains, a movement came out of Japan that became known as the Total Quality Management approach to business. It was all about reducing product defects to as close to zero as possible. Out of this came things like Six Sigma Black Belt, as well as a general belief that when you buy something, it's going to work. The 1990s were all about Just-in-Time manufacturing. For example, companies like Dell shortened the supply chain through building things on demand. As a result, the computer giant could dramatically control inventory, while at the same time push prices lower. Companies started to succeed based on being the lowest-priced player in the game, while at this higher level of quality. In the 2000s, it became all about the Internet era. Businesses built websites and could make everything available globally 24/7. Then in the 2010s, everything that happened over the past three decades came together.

How to Customize Slack for Social Media Teams

How to Customize Slack for Social Media Teams

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Is more than one person involved with your social media marketing? Are you looking for a way to improve collaboration on marketing projects? Whether your team is within an office building or scattered around the world, Slack's third-party app integrations make it easy to create a customized collaboration center. In this article you'll discover how to customize Slack for social media team collaboration. Listen to this article: Why Slack? Slack, an online communication tool for teams, is designed to replace email. Team conversations take place in chat rooms, or "channels." You can create channels for different projects or topics. You can also direct message individuals and select groups of people. All of the content that you post on Slack is searchable, including files, conversations, people, and notifications. Just enter a keyword or two in the search box at the top right and press Enter. Slack will integrate with many third-party tools, such as Google Drive, Trello, Dropbox, Heroku, Crashlytics, GitHub, Runscope, and Zendesk. It also will support community-built integrations. Here's how to integrate third-party tools with Slack and use key Slack features to communicate with your social media marketing team. #1: Choose Apps to Integrate With Slack Slack allows you to connect a variety of third-party apps. Explore the directory to find apps that will help your team. Screenhero and Google Hangouts are two communication apps in particular that you'll likely want to connect to your team's Slack account. Screenhero Screenhero is an app that lets your team use screen sharing for collaboration. Screen sharing is an easy way to present your ideas to the group without having to send files back and forth. Everyone can jump in and get problems solved quickly and efficiently without wasting time on logistics. You can initiate screen sharing with your co-workers by using the "/username" command. Coolest of all, Slack allows everyone to use their own cursor to point out elements in the shared screen. Google Hangouts No matter how much you love using Slack, not all of your vendors and clients are going to feel the same way. This is where Google+ Hangouts' Slack integration comes in handy. Google+ Hangouts chat is the perfect way to communicate quickly and efficiently with people who work outside of your Slack environment. You can also integrate a Hangouts chat with any communication method on Slack: channels, private groups, or direct/group messages. You don't have to switch between the two applications, which is a huge timesaver. Plus, it provides everyone with easily searchable instant messages. Both you and the other party keep a record of each conversation. #2: Install App Integrations To connect third-party apps with Slack, go to www.slack.com/apps. In the search box at the top of the page, enter the name of the app you want to integrate with Slack. Once you select the app, you see a page with details about it. Click the Install button to install the app to your team's Slack account. On the next page, click the Add [app name] Integration button, and the app will be installed. Next, you have the option to customize the username and icon for the integration. After you make your changes, click Save Settings. #3: Explore Other Slack Features Three of the most useful (and fun) built-in Slack features are Quick Switcher, Recent Mentions, and Create Your Own Emojis. Here's how to use and access these features. Quick Switcher Quick Switcher is the fastest way to jump to a conversation in Slack. To open the box below, press Command+K on the Mac or Ctrl+K on Windows. You can now quickly navigate a list of your channels, groups, and direct messages. Tip: Quick Switcher is just one of many features you can access with a keyboard shortcut. To see the full list of shortcuts, press Command+? on the Mac or Ctrl+? on Windows.

7 Ways to Improve Your LinkedIn Company Page

7 Ways to Improve Your LinkedIn Company Page

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want more exposure for your business on LinkedIn? Are you using your LinkedIn company page to its full potential? LinkedIn company pages let you provide value to your audience while giving them the chance to engage with your business, effectively establishing your credibility as a trusted resource. In this article you'll discover seven ways a LinkedIn company page can help your business stand out on LinkedIn. Listen to this article: #1: Support Brand Recognition There are two primary visuals to be aware of on your LinkedIn company page: your company logo, which should be consistent on all websites and marketing materials, and the banner image on the top of your profile, which you can customize for LinkedIn and change whenever you'd like. The banner (or background) image is important to brand your company. Since you may have a different audience on LinkedIn from your other social networks, keep certain graphic elements that define your brand such as colors, fonts, and design, while adding visual variety. For example, HubSpot's LinkedIn banner image has their colors, along with the words "Academy & You," to promote the #FindYourAnd hashtag campaign for their HubSpot Academy educational program. Even though there's a place for your website link on your LinkedIn company page, I recommend that you add your URL and central phone number (if you have one) to the banner image. You don't need to include your logo, since it will be right above the image on your page. Add a call to action, tag line, or hashtag to invite some engagement from your audience. In addition to a main primary banner image, create custom background images too. This can promote upcoming events, a new content series, a product launch, a hashtag campaign, your best clients, or new hires. For instance, Ventiv Technology features their new CEO in their current background image. More than anything, your visuals should be consistent and reflect your other social media and business branding. To update your company page images, or really anything on your page profile, click Edit on the right side of your company page, then Edit Page. #2: Promote Specialized Landing Pages Your website URL is required for your company page, and it's likely you'll want to keep the main one most of the time. However, if you're launching a book or promoting something, change your website URL to point to your blog or a product or event page. Putting your website URL in the banner image gives you the freedom to change the link for your website at any time. #3: Speak Directly to Prospects In a lot of situations, the company description is someone's first impression of your business. Whether they're job seekers looking for more info about your company, vendors seeking strategic partnership, or potential customers and clients checking you out, you want to captivate them immediately. Most businesses copy and paste their About section from the company website. While that's better than nothing, there's a way to step it up a notch. Write a description that directly speaks to the people who are visiting your company page, letting them know who you are and how you can benefit them. In her description, Jeanne Bliss of CustomerBLISS tells her company's story and her background, shares the pain point of her ideal client, and then states how she can help. Plus, the image is an excellent visual representation of what she has to offer. Speak directly to the client with a description that builds your and your business's credibility. #4: Improve Visibility in Search Go to the Specialties section and add your keywords. This will make your company page a little easier to find. Your keywords are likely your specialties. Make them known, so those searching can find your company. #5: Feature Specialties Showcase pages are really subpages of your company page. You may want to use showcase pages if you have an annu...

What Is SEO & How To Optimize Your Website's Rankings | MOJO's Blog

What Is SEO & How To Optimize Your Website's Rankings | MOJO's Blog


MOJO Marketplace Blog

Learn The Fundamentals Of Search Engine Optimization & How To Implement Key Features Onto Your Website. Don't Let SEO Scare You. It's Easy, Learn More Now.

Twitter Quality Score for Ads: What Marketers Need to Know

Twitter Quality Score for Ads: What Marketers Need to Know

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you using Twitter ads? Do you want a better return on your investment? Twitter uses its ads quality score to determine how your ads are displayed, and how much you pay if people engage with them. In this article I'll share how to create Twitter content that raises your Twitter ads quality to maximize the ROI on your Twitter ads. Listen to this article: Why Your Twitter Ads Quality Score Matters The Google AdWords’ quality score rewards advertisers who create engaging ads with much lower cost per click and more prominent ad placement. This year, Facebook introduced a quality score of its own, called relevance score, which determines your ad cost and placement on that social network. Now Twitter has jumped on board with a similar algorithm to reward the most engaging ads and penalize low-performing ads on their platform. Although there was no formal announcement, Twitter recently confirmed in a new section in the Twitter Ads Help documentation that they use it. (A few months ago, this section of the guide didn't exist.) So what does Twitter ads quality score actually do and how do you find out if your quality scores are any good? For starters, you can't actually see your quality adjusted bid in your Twitter Ads Manager. It remains a hidden internal metric for now. Regardless, Twitter's quality adjusted bids algorithm isn't some arbitrary metric you can ignore. As with Google AdWords, increasing the quality score on your Twitter ads actually earns you a huge click discount. In fact, on average, when you gain one point in the engagement rates on your ads, you see a 5% decrease in cost per engagement. Therefore, regarding Twitter ads campaigns, if you can get engagement rates up to 60% or so, the cost per engagement becomes one cent. If you can get it to 36%, it's two cents. On the other hand, if your engagement rate (and therefore your quality score) falls to 7%, the cost per click will go up to about eight cents per click. That's an 800% increase. Plus, really low engagement gets even worse (meaning more costly). If your engagement is something like 0.14%, you will end up paying a whopping $2.50 per engagement. That's more than 250 times more expensive than promoting a high-engagement ad. It's unnecessary to overpay for your ads like that when you can just as easily boost your Twitter quality scores and get substantially better rates. Here's how to master the Twitter ads quality score algorithm to get better engagement and rates on your Twitter ad campaigns. #1: Keep Twitter Ads Fresh to Retain High Impressions Twitter wants to show users the freshest content, so tweet new material regularly. No matter how good the ad, the number of impressions per day declines over time. And, as time goes on, Twitter is less likely to show older tweets. The solution is to create different variations of each ad. It will be much more effective, and have much higher visibility and engagement, than running the same ads for lengthy periods of time. #2: Build on Existing Engagement to Pay Less Rather than paying more than $2 per click to promote low-engagement (and poor) content, promote tweets that are already doing well. For example, the tweet below got 1,500 retweets. Plus, that piece of content received 100,000 visits referred from Twitter. And all for $250. When you pay to promote high-engagement tweets, it will often give your organic performance a boost. People will want to share popular tweets they see on their own networks. Besides, you don't pay for those additional retweets and engagement. Remember, though, if you promote content no one wants to engage with or share, you pay more for each click. Furthermore, you will see little (if any) free organic engagement. My strategy is not to promote every tweet. I only promote the top 1% to 3% of status updates with 15% or greater engagement rates. When I do,

SEO Glossary of Terms and Concepts

SEO Glossary of Terms and Concepts


SEO Theory

Be sure to review these special pages: SEO Theorems and Principles What is Lead Generation? A Guide to Major Google Algorithms Basic SEO Glossary A/B Test – Noun phrase. The practice of creating tw…

8 Ways to Customize Slack for Social Media Marketers

8 Ways to Customize Slack for Social Media Marketers

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you use Slack? Want to streamline communication with team members and clients? There are a number of third-party apps and add-ons to help you customize Slack to fit your marketing team's needs. In this article, you'll discover eight apps for social media marketers using Slack. Listen to this article: #1: Monitor Your Twitter Feed With the Twitter integration, you can send all of the updates from your Twitter feed directly to a Slack channel. This includes direct messages, mentions, replies, and retweets. You can also monitor outgoing tweets from your Twitter account. Social media marketers can use this integration as a Twitter dashboard. #2: Collaborate With Team Members With Hootsuite Hootsuite has more than 150 app integrations, including Slack. Installing the Hootsuite Slack app lets you send a social post from your Hootsuite dashboard directly to a Slack channel. Note that the app doesn't allow you to send posts from your dashboard directly to a Slack user. However, through a Slack channel, the app lets you collaborate with your team and get the right response for particular social posts. #3: Monitor Subscribers' Social Details With Drift Drift is a live chat service that can be hosted on your website. It lets you chat directly with website users. While the stand-alone product is not particularly helpful for social media marketers, its Slack app is a handy tool. Drift's Slack integration can be connected to your MailChimp account. Once you set this up, you'll receive a notification on your Slack channel every time somebody subscribes. The notifications contain details about subscribers' social media accounts, which is handy if you want to reach out to them that way. You can then use this integration to initiate conversations with them. #4: Find Trending Stories With Nuzzel Nuzzel lets you see the most shared content from your friends' feeds and your friends' friends' feeds. This makes the content that you read very personal and reflective of the topics you're interested in. Think of it as a newspaper service that curates content based on your interests. Nuzzel lets you connect your Facebook and Twitter accounts. Once you do that, it shows you the most popular content in your timeline. With the Nuzzel Slack integration, you can get notifications of popular content in your niche through a Slack channel. This is helpful when you're curating content that you want to share across your social profiles. #5: Integrate RSS Feeds As a social media marketer, you need to follow multiple blogs, influencers, and official news from social platforms to stay on top of industry news, and subscribing to RSS feeds will help you do that. Every time new content pops up on the blogs or sites that you follow, the RSS feeds will give you an update. You can integrate RSS feeds into Slack to ensure that you receive new updates. Once you subscribe to an RSS feed, Slack will automatically update the feed and post new content in a Slack channel. #6: Send Short Video With Giphy GIFs are a great way to convey your thoughts or appreciation to people on social media, as they combine two crucial things: your message and a pop-culture reference, which shows a human side to your business. By installing Giphy on Slack, you won't have to switch platforms to search for the right GIF when you're communicating with people on Slack. For example, if you type in "/giphy im busy," you might get a GIF like this one. #7: Run Polls With Open Agora Slack is known for team collaboration. But how many times do you see all of the communication happening in a channel? It's easy for people to start ignoring stuff unless it's directed toward them. If you need your team's help, polls are a great way to share opinions. It could be anything from deciding whether to run a social campaign or providing an extra six months of onsite warranty to a user.

Influencer Marketing: How to Work With Influential People

Influencer Marketing: How to Work With Influential People

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you reach out to influencers? Want to create good relationships to increase your visibility and get more customers? To learn how to work with influencers, I interview Doug Karr. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview conversion expert Doug Karr, the author of Corporate Blogging for Dummies and founder of the Marketing Technology blog. Doug also co-hosts the Edge of the Web podcast. Doug will explore influencer marketing and how to work with prominent people. You'll discover how to identify and reach out to influencers, as well as develop relationships and campaigns that lead to sales. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. How to subscribe/review on iPhone. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Influencer Marketing How Doug became interested in influencer marketing After Doug got out of the Navy in 1992, he started a newspaper and did direct and database marketing. Then about 12 years ago, he started a blog. From a database marketing standpoint, Doug shares he's always been intrigued by the pockets or the gaps, and not the averages. In the direct mail days, the motto was "go after a certain age group, gender and neighborhood, and get 100% saturation." Doug found, over time, it was the smaller pockets of people who had higher conversion rates. This is true in online marketing as well. People who do SEO optimize for huge keywords with massive search volumes. Maybe they rank, but they don't get any results (meaning business) out of it. Influencer marketing is the same, in that people go after influencers. They spend a lot of money without seeing results, because they make significant errors as they select and research influencers. Doug says he tells people who are transitioning from traditional to online media that he doesn't think a lot has changed. As marketers, it's all about building trust and satisfying clients. Blogging and social media are great for that, because customers can now talk to people at different companies and get insight into their business through these channels. You build relationships virtually, then get those people to convert. Listen to the show to hear what opportunities came to Doug from blogging. How Doug defines influencer marketing Doug believes influencers are people within our industry who already have established trust with an audience. Let's say someone has an amazing audience you want to reach. The best way to get to that person's audience is to create an influencer marketing campaign and work with that influencer to help you promote your products and services. The keys are audience (find an influencer whose audience matches what you need) and reach. Determine if the influencer's reach is wide enough to make your campaign sensible from a time and money standpoint. Listen to the show to hear examples of good influencers to reach out to in the marketing and social media space. The differences among reach, popularity and influence Doug says half of the time, a company fails because they focus on reach and popularity, but not necessarily on influence. Influence is not about retweets or shares. It's about conversions. If someone makes a purchase based on a person's advice, that person is an influencer. When Doug works with an influencer, he looks at that person's target audience to see whether he or she has captivated their trust and made sales to them. One of the telltale signs that influencers are doing well is they've had the same sponsor on their site for 3 years; they don't switch them out every month. Doug also cautions that before entering into a relationshi...

SEO News You Should Be Reading

by B² Interactive @ B² Interactive

SEO is constantly changing and to say that what you’re doing today will work six months from now, isn’t a sure thing. That’s why it’s important to know where to look for good information. Good SEO requires knowing what’s going on within the industry and adapting along with it. The best way to keep up […]

The post SEO News You Should Be Reading appeared first on B² Interactive.

6 Tips to Increase Your Social Media Shares

6 Tips to Increase Your Social Media Shares

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want more people to share your content? Looking for more reach via social shares? By making a few adjustments to how you create, publish, and post your content, you can increase the likelihood that others will share it more often. In this article, you'll discover six tips to help you maximize your social shares. Listen to this article: #1: Research Trending Topics It pays to do your research ahead of time. Having a better understanding of what successful content looks like in your industry increases the likelihood of it being shared. Use a tool like BuzzSumo to help identify top shared content. You can search for top shared content pertaining to a topic or keyword, results sorted by overall shares. Alternatively, you can search by domain to view top shared content specific to a website. You get a comprehensive breakdown of shares per social network, which helps you decide where to focus your efforts. PostReach is another great tool to measure content performance across each social network. Simply enter an article's URL in PostReach and run a free report. In addition, you can also run a total share breakdown report. For further exploration, you can view detailed Twitter share activity. You can plot Twitter activity across a share timeline. You can also see which users most retweeted the article and view your overall reach through sharer audience sizes. Finally, you can zero in on specific sharers and potential influencers with a detailed inventory of sharers provided at the bottom of the report. Keep in mind, the purpose of this research is not to duplicate existing content, but rather to identify popular topics in your niche and add something new to the conversation. Make it your goal to go above and beyond top shared content. #2: Make Sharing Easy for Blog Visitors Your audience is more likely to share content when it takes minimal effort. If your website already receives regular traffic, take advantage of the potential social shares by designing your most popular content for easy sharing. An effective approach is to implement social buttons on your website. If you operate a WordPress site, there's plenty of useful plugins for one-click sharing buttons, including Social Pug. The way your content reads can also encourage social engagement. Have a great tip to share in an article? Post a share button directly below your article, as demonstrated by Brian Dean of Backlinko. You can create a unique call to action using ClickToTweet. To start, enter your desired text in the text box and click Generate New Link. Make sure it includes a link back to your post. You can embed the code in the appropriate part of your content. #3: Provide Context in Headlines There's a strong chance your content is being snubbed if your headline fails to grab people. It becomes increasingly important to hook your audience with a headline, as online attention spans continue to dwindle. Social audiences tend to favor snackable content; bite-sized pieces that quickly convey their intent. BuzzFeed articles are essentially engineered to take advantage of this trend: easily consumed and shared. They further entice the audience to read the content by addressing them individually. For example, you'll encounter dozens of instances of "you" and "your" throughout. What else goes into a headline worth clicking? Conductor analyzed user preferences and found that users tend to gravitate towards numbers, personalization, educational resources, and questions. When shared, a well-crafted headline functions like a status update, in that it will summarize the user's opinion or awareness of a subject. Want your best content to receive more shares across social networks? Start thinking about your headlines in a social context. #4: Capitalize on Visual Interest Attach images to your posts to help them stand out and benefit your ...

The complete SEO guide for photographers: 50 tips to rank higher

The complete SEO guide for photographers: 50 tips to rank higher


ForegroundWeb

50 actionable SEO tips to maximize your photography website Google rankings & get found online (with examples & resources).

How to Build Links and Optimize your Website for Multiple Keywords

by Jeffrey_Smith @ SEO Design Solutions™ Blog

In case you were wondering how to systematically achieve saturation for multiple keywords for your website in search engines (instead of just a few) using SEO, then this is a must read post. This tactic is specifically designed to work in Google using the allinanchor / keyword relevance ratio to back links pointing at your Read More

Social Growth: How to Use Pinterest to Grow Your Following on Facebook, YouTube and Beyond

Social Growth: How to Use Pinterest to Grow Your Following on Facebook, YouTube and Beyond

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Are you active on Pinterest? Have you thought about using Pinterest to grow your other social networks? To discover how to drive traffic from Pinterest to other networks, I interview Natalie Jill. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Natalie Jill, the founder of Natalie Jill Fitness, a site dedicated to health and fitness. She inspires women around the world with her videos and visual content. She's also got a unique social strategy that helped her grow 1.3 million Facebook fans and 476,000 Instagram fans. Natalie will explore how she uses Pinterest as her secret marketing tool to build a loyal following on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and beyond. You'll discover how to adapt your content for Pinterest. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Social Growth What led Natalie to social media Natalie says she got into social media by accident. While dealing with a lot of personal issues, she turned to Facebook to develop a support system and talk about her struggles. She explains how sharing what she was doing to lose weight and posting pictures of food in an album called "What I Eat" developed into a downloadable ebook of her recipes. This led to her first full product, which is now called 7 Day Jump Start. By sharing success stories of the people who bought her book and listening to what her audience was asking, Natalie's Facebook presence started to grow and her products started to take off. That's how Natalie Jill Fitness was born. Listen to the show to learn what Natalie thinks makes a good salesperson. Why Pinterest is great for marketers Natalie initially built her business on Facebook (pre-Facebook pages) and had about 5,000 subscribers when she realized she couldn't keep everything on Facebook. She started exploring other social media platforms like Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram. Natalie says she was looking for a social media site where she could post her content and reach more people over time. When she noticed older items getting repinned, she decided Pinterest had the content value-over-time effect she was looking for. A year and a half ago, Natalie started deep-diving into Pinterest and says she currently has 1.3 million fans on Facebook and fewer than 50,000 followers on Pinterest (it's one of her smallest social networks). She goes on to explain why the lower Pinterest follower count doesn't matter when it comes to content shares. She also points out that Pinterest comes up in Google search, which is a huge benefit. When Natalie noticed she was getting a lot of website traffic from Pinterest, she decided to figure out how to use Pinterest to help with her content in other places. Natalie explains how she tested her tactic, which she calls the Pinfinity concept, starting with Facebook and a Pinterest board called "Bodyweight Exercises." Now people searching for body, weight, exercise, workouts, fit mom, etc., find her on Google+ or on Pinterest, and they're taken back to her video on Facebook. Although there's no built-in option to pin things from Facebook, Natalie has found a way to do it. Natalie explains why she drives traffic to social networks instead of her website. Listen to the show to hear how many Facebook followers Natalie had before she started this experiment. How Natalie uses Pinterest to grow her other social networks YouTube is another example of Natalie's method at work. When she started her YouTube channel about a year and a half ago, she had a few videos but no subscribers. She shares how she's built her YouTube channel to ove...

How to Use Pinterest to Connect With a Local Audience

How to Use Pinterest to Connect With a Local Audience

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you use Pinterest to build relationships with your audience? Do you want to strengthen ties with your local community? Including a strong geographic focus in your Pinterest marketing can help you create more visibility with people who live or are interested in your locale. In this article you'll discover how to use Pinterest to connect with a local audience. Listen to this article: #1: Add Geographic Information to Your Profile Along with your keyword-rich explanation of what your business does and what you pin, be sure to mention what areas you serve or where your business is located. This helps you show up in Pinterest search results for your area, and lets people know if you're close enough for them to visit or engage your services. If your local business profile is missing this crucial bit of information, click the Edit Profile button to go to your profile. Make sure to enter your location and add more geographic cues in the About You section (think "Serving the Lakes Region of Southern North Carolina") and consider whether your followers might appreciate the extra hint. This is especially helpful if you're a franchisee. Don't limit yourself too much, though. Granite Ridge Estate, a wedding barn, lists their small-town location of Norway, Maine, but also uses "New England" so people searching a broader area have a good chance of discovering them. Adding geographic information may seem like an obvious step, but you'd be surprised how many local businesses leave it out. Suppose you're a photographer looking to attract new business. How will people know if you're close enough to hire if you don't tell them where you are and how far you'll travel? Make it easy for people to find you and buy from you. #2: Optimize Your Boards and Pins for Local Searches Adding your location to the descriptions of individual pins can help people find you when they do a search on Pinterest or Google. That's right, pins (as well as boards and profiles) can be indexed by Google. Include your town or state name in a board or two, as well as any applicable pins. If you serve several areas or your area is known by several names, have a board for any location that people might search for. It's perfectly fine to have more than one board with similar pins. Here's a Granite Ridge Estate pin that pops up in a Google Search for "Maine wedding venue Norway." The exact number of searches performed annually on Pinterest is unclear, but with 100 million users, you can be sure it's significant. VentureBeat reports that the number of Pinterest searches has been increasing by about 81% per year, so it's in your best interest to optimize for search. If you search for "barn wedding new England" on Pinterest, you'll see one of Granite Ridge Estate's boards. The combination of the board title, description, and pins on the board helped the business show up for this search. How can you use this tactic for your business? Wherever appropriate, add your location to your boards, board descriptions, and pin descriptions. If you want people from out of town to find you, think about how people would look for your area. They may not search for Norway, Maine (it's tiny), but they might search for "Southern Maine," "New England," "Maine," or "Southern New England." Using keywords strategically can help ensure your business shows up in location-centered searches. Go through your account and make sure you've used a location wherever it makes sense. For example, if you're a photographer and you pin your work, add the location to the photos in each shoot. Did you take those amazing bridal photos at Scarborough Beach, Maine? Tell people that! #3: Repin and Engage With Fellow Local Businesses Pinterest is more of a search and discovery platform than a true social network. However, there are social elements that allow you to stand out from the crowd of solitary shoppers and pin collectors.

How to Use Facebook Business Manager to Share Account Access

How to Use Facebook Business Manager to Share Account Access

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you have multiple business pages and ad accounts on Facebook? Looking for a secure way to share access to them? Facebook's Business Manager makes it easy to give people access to your Facebook presence without sharing your password. In this article, you'll discover how to add your Facebook accounts to Business Manager. Listen to this article: #1: Set Up Business Manager To get started with Business Manager, first you need to create an account. Go to https://business.facebook.com/ and click the Create Account button. Log in with whatever credentials you currently use on Facebook. In a minute, you'll be able to designate a business email address, which will be the one that appears on and communicates with the Business Manager tool. Next, enter your business name and click Continue. Now type in your name and the business email address that you want Business Manager to communicate with. Even though you use your personal credentials to log in, everyone else you interact with through the tool will see your business address. When you're done, click Finish. Now that you've set up your account, here's how to use it to manage your Facebook business pages and ad accounts. #2: Connect With Business Pages Facebook's Business Manager lets you manage multiple Facebook pages, get an overview of analytics when you log in, and jump from one page to another within the tool. Here's how to add your page, request access to a page, or create a new one. Claim an Existing Page To claim an existing Facebook page that your business owns, click on Claim Assets and select Page. Then type in either the page name (which should begin to auto-populate) or the page's URL. The auto-populate feature is hit or miss, so it's a good idea to have the page URL in hand. When you're finished, click Claim Page. Request Access If another admin is managing the Facebook page, click Request Access and select Page. Then type in the Facebook page name or URL for which you want to request access and click Request Access. Create a New Facebook Page If you don't yet have a Facebook page, or want to create an additional one, click Add New and select Page. Next, select the category for your new page and then follow the prompts to finish setting up your page. Manage Your Pages Once your Facebook page is set up, you can easily manage it from within Business Manager. To do this, simply click the name of the page that you want to manage on the overview page of Business Manager. To quickly jump back and forth between the tool and your pages, click the Menu button to display or hide the Business Manager menu whenever you're on your Facebook page. #3: Assign Access to Pages Managing who has access to your Facebook pages is an important and welcome function of the Business Manager tool. To add new people, click Add New and select People. As you can see below, Facebook clearly defines what level of access admins have versus employees. Type in the email address of the person you want to add. Next, select which of your pages you want this person to be able to access, and which role he or she will be assigned. For more information about roles, select Learn About Roles from the Default Role menu, which will help you further decide what level of access to grant the new person. Next, select any ad accounts to which your employee will have access. Finally, you can assign your employee to a product catalog if you have one set up. If not, click Skip. You should now see a confirmation that your invitation has been sent. It will be delivered to the email address that you entered in Step 1, and you'll receive notification when that person has accepted his or her new role. If at any time you need to change an admin's or employee's role, click Business Settings and then select People. #4: Add Ad Accounts There are three ways you can add Facebook ad accounts to B...

Online Reviews for Local Businesses: What Marketers Need to Know

Online Reviews for Local Businesses: What Marketers Need to Know

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you own or manage a local business? Are you leveraging the full power of online reviews? To discover how to leverage online review services, I interview Martin Shervington. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Martin Shervington, one of the world's leading experts on Google+ and Google for Business. As a trainer, speaker and consultant, he helps marketers understand how to best utilize Google's services. Martin will explore online reviews for local businesses. You'll discover how to get reviews for your business, as well as how to respond to negative reviews. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. How to subscribe on iPhone. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Online Reviews for Local Businesses Google for business In June 2014 Google launched Google My Business, which simplifies how people set up pages. Part of this is for local businesses, so they can appear on a map, get reviews and so on. Martin has been doing research on this and says businesses are not quite connecting the dots on Google+ marketing and using this powerful tool. He says as of last year, only 37% of businesses had claimed their Google listing, 63% have not. Listen to the show to discover more about Google My Business. The impact of reviews Martin has spoken to hundreds of businesses (owners and staff) about reviews. People use reviews as a socialized way to judge the businesses around them, which get more customers as a result of reviews. For example, Martin shares, Tasty Thai in San Mateo can attribute thousands of dollars of revenue to one single positive Yelp review from a guy who had been to Thailand and loves their Thai food. At the moment Yelp has a lot of people's attention, and Martin hopes Google reviews will get to that level as well. Reviews can bring tourists, new people and new business. The downside is there's the potential for negative reviews. "[Businesses have to have] good service, good product and sometimes be willing to say when you haven't got it 100% right," Martin says. Listen to the show to hear about an amazing experience I had while traveling, based on a Yelp review. Google listings Martin explains how Google sometimes auto-generates a business listing, and a lot of people's businesses are listed without them knowing about it. To determine if your business has an auto-generated listing, Google your location to see if anything comes up. If it doesn't, go to Google.com/business to set one up. If it is already set up, click where it says "claim this listing," so you can control uploading photos, reply to posted reviews and more. When you set up a page on Google they verify it by phone or by mail. There are two different types of local pages, Martin continues, a storefront and a service area. If you run your business from home, say you are a service area to hide your address. Once you've claimed your property or set up your page from scratch, there are several things you can do: change the profile image (which is the icon people see when you make comments or reply to reviews), change your cover photo, manage your photos, add what you do to the description area, post on that Google page, reply to reviews, share reviews and more. You can even embed the best reviews on your website. This is how you take the social proof you get from reviews and spread it onto your website. The Google My Business dashboard provides a higher-level frame-of-reference around the things that are connected to your business, such as analytics, your YouTube channel, the page insights and the Google+ page itself.

Search to Social Ads: How to Use Google With Facebook to Build Niche Audiences

Search to Social Ads: How to Use Google With Facebook to Build Niche Audiences

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Does your business serve a specialized customer base? Wondering how to reach specific niche audiences with Facebook ads? To explore a strategy for retargeting specialized audiences using Google ads in combination with Facebook ads, I interview Shane Sams. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Shane Sams, the co-host of the Flipped Lifestyle podcast, a show focused on helping families make money online. He describes himself as a normal guy from Kentucky who loves helping others. He's also the founder of the Flip Your Life Community. Shane explains how to use website traffic generated by Google ads to retarget Facebook users. You'll discover how highly focused keywords help manage your marketing costs. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Search to Social Ads Shane's Story Shane and his wife Jocelyn met at the University of Kentucky. After graduation, Jocelyn initially worked a corporate job and Shane coached football. They then decided to become schoolteachers, which they did for about 10 years. Shane taught social studies and continued to coach, while Jocelyn was an elementary school librarian. After some bad experiences at work, Shane realized he had traded control of his life for job security. He started looking for other things to do because he knew there had to be a better way. This was in 2012. One day, as Shane and his wife were driving around town, Shane said, "I wonder if I can get 100 people to send me $50." She asked what he was talking about and Shane said that out of the 7 billion people on the planet, surely 100 would give him $50. If they all did that in a month, it would be $5,000, and for 12 months in a row, it would be $60,000. If they could do that every month, they could quit teaching. Shane didn't know how he was going to make this money but he was determined to figure it out. He began seeking information about business. One day while mowing the grass, Shane decided to look up business podcasts. An image of a guy looking at the podcast art with his eyeballs caught Shane's attention. It was Smart Passive Income with Pat Flynn. In the podcast, Pat talked about how he sold a study guide and would email it to people. Shane decided he and Jocelyn could sell PDFs of information. After trying different things online, they were finally able to figure it out. They sold lesson plans to teachers and football playbooks to coaches. A year later, Shane and Jocelyn replaced their income. As soon as they quit their jobs (which they did on September 27, 2013), people started asking questions. For example, Lindsay, a friend of Jocelyn's, quit her job to be a stay-at-home mom and wanted advice on making money online. They helped Lindsay create digital products and she made $1,000 on the Internet in a month. This money enabled Lindsay to be at home with her daughter every day. After Shane and Jocelyn realized their experience and knowledge could change the lives of others, they started Flipped Lifestyle. It has helped a lot of people. People ask why it's called Flipped Lifestyle. Shane explains that everybody flipped out after Jocelyn and he left their jobs, where they had tenure and insurance. Shane recalls how his mom cornered him and said, "Shane Sams, you have babies. You have lost your mind. You have flipped out. And I do not approve of this decision." Hence, Flipped Lifestyle. Listen to the show to hear Shane recall how much sharing online business skills meant to his friends. Why Combine Google Ads With Facebook? Early on, Shane and Jocelyn discovered a lot of the marketing advice available online didn't work for ...

SEO & Content Marketing: A Match Made In Heaven - Gurus NYC Blog

SEO & Content Marketing: A Match Made In Heaven - Gurus NYC Blog


Gurus NYC Blog

Learn how to properly align your content marketing and SEO strategies. The Gurus go in-depth and teach you how to combine both in order to succeed.

What Is SEO / Search Engine Optimization?

What Is SEO / Search Engine Optimization?


Search Engine Land

Get started learning all about SEO from the industry's most trusted source, Search Engine Land. Review basics of search engine optimization, ranking factors & more.

Local SEO for Small Businesses

by Adam Coombs @ Unamo Blog

Local SEO for Small Businesses The organic search results are already a tough place to fight for top rankings. Local search results? Even harder. Besides traditional SEO, there are a variety of local SEO ranking factors that small businesses and even larger franchises have to worry about when jockeying for the top positions for localized […]

A Guide to International SEO: Strategies and Guidelines

by Natalie Severt @ Unamo Blog

You have a business. Your business has a website. You use localized keyword research and traditional SEO tactics to help your business rank well online. You have a diversified backlink profile and high domain authority. Congratulations! But now you want to expand. And this is where it gets complicated. How do you create an international […]

How to Encourage Employees to Share Your Content on LinkedIn

How to Encourage Employees to Share Your Content on LinkedIn

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are your employees on LinkedIn? Do they share your company's content with their networks? Asking your employees to promote your company content on LinkedIn is a great way to reach more prospects and increase visibility. In this article I'll explain how to help your employees share your content on LinkedIn. #1: Promote the Program The first step to starting a LinkedIn employee engagement program is to find and appoint a leader. Look for someone from marketing who's enthusiastic about LinkedIn and excited about this program. You'll want to choose a passionate leader who can motivate your employees and get them excited to participate. Listen to this article: Once you've established a leader, get a couple of employees on board before rolling out the program to the rest of your staff. Later on, after you work out the bugs and streamline the processes, these employees can promote the program and encourage others to participate. Now you're ready to launch the program to everyone. #2: Communicate the Goal First, explain and outline your company's current digital marketing efforts and what it takes to get followers for your social media channels. Then, make it clear that the program's overarching goal is for all employees to attract new followers and customers by representing the company as a cohesive team. Finally, create a short but powerful mission statement that will engage employees in helping you to achieve the goal of your LinkedIn Employee Engagement Program. #3: Highlight Participant Benefits To get your employees' buy-in, share why their participation can benefit them personally and professionally. For example, the program can increase exposure to potential customers, drive more leads and increase sales, possibly resulting in higher bonuses or profit-sharing. Additionally, participating in the program can enhance your employees' personal profiles, activities and visibility on LinkedIn, and they'll be seen as industry professionals. And it may even improve their reputation within the industry your company serves. #4: Outline Profile and Engagement Expectations Spend some time going over what you expect from employees who take part in the program. Keep in mind that you don't want to overload them with too much extra work. Here are some tasks you might want to ask them to do: Optimize Personal Profiles It's important that employees have a complete and professional-looking LinkedIn profile. Ask them to update their profile with a company and job description (which may come from marketing). You'll probably need to walk employees through how to optimize their LinkedIn profiles. Show them how to: Claim a vanity URL. Add or change their profile picture. A professional-looking profile image goes a long way toward making the right first impression on LinkedIn. Set the correct industry description. Update the Summary section and add rich media (especially if your company produces high-quality videos and other rich media). Update the Experience section. Link their current position to the LinkedIn company page (thus increasing your company's LinkedIn page rank in organic searches on Google). Update and optimize their contact information. Expand Personal Networks Share how together as a team you'll be able to reach hundreds or thousands of people who may be interested in reading and engaging with the company's content. The larger their personal networks, the better. Provide instructions on how and why your staff should connect with fellow employees, customers, partners, prospects and so on. Explain how this will help expand the reach of your company's content on LinkedIn. You might share an example like the following: "Say that 20 employees in the program have 200 connections. This means that potentially 4,000 people could see and engage with our content if we shared and promoted it. Even if only a small percentage of these 4,

Advanced Blogging: How to Go Big With Your Blog

Advanced Blogging: How to Go Big With Your Blog

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you have a blog for your business? Are you ready to take your blogging to the next level? To explore how to build your blog readership, I interview Darren Rowse for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Darren Rowse, the world's leading authority on blogging. He authored the book ProBlogger and founded two popular blogs: Digital Photography School and ProBlogger. Darren has been blogging since 2002 and his work has inspired millions of people. Darren shares how he built a mega-blog with millions of monthly readers. You'll discover how to attract more readers, engage your audience and monetize your blog. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Advanced Blogging How Darren started blogging In 2002 Darren came across a blog for the first time and knew right away it was a medium he wanted to explore. Almost immediately, he started his first blog. Darren explains that he had no background in technology or writing, just a fascination with community and communication. He developed an audience for his personal blog over the next year and a half, writing about a variety of niche topics (photography, spirituality, movies, politics). When his audience "complained" that there was too much variety, Darren split the topics up into different blogs. From there, Darren began to experiment with making money from blogging. It evolved from a hobby into a part-time job, then grew into a full-time business. Listen to the show to hear how many blogs Darren launched over the years. Why it's never too late to start blogging When Darren first started blogging, he looked at the big bloggers and thought he was too late to start. At that point, the big names had only been blogging for a year or two. However, Darren says new bloggers are breaking through all the time. More blogs mean greater opportunities to network and the ability to grow faster, especially if you can get on the radar of an influencer in your niche. While there may be a ton of bloggers out there, Darren explains that there's nobody who has your exact set of experiences, opinions, stories, skills and perspectives, and that's what sets you apart. If you can harness your uniqueness, there's certainly a way to get noticed. Listen to the show to hear how blogging in your niche will serve you well now and in the future. Digital Photography School, then and now Darren started Digital Photography School in 2006. It evolved from one of his previous blogs—a digital camera review blog. It was quite profitable, Darren explains, but not particularly satisfying. He wanted a blog about photography that he enjoyed writing—where he could build a relationship with his readers and answer common photography questions. When the site launched, Darren wrote all of the blog content himself (two to three posts per week), focusing on evergreen content and throwing shareable content into the mix. It was on a free theme, boot strapped, and gradually began to rank in Google and develop a following. He monetized using AdSense and Amazon affiliate marketing. A photography enthusiast, Darren says he's the guy in your circle of friends who people ask to photograph parties because they can't afford a real photographer. He's also the one everyone comes to before they buy a camera. He started the site writing beginner-level content. As the site developed, he hired professional photographers to write for the more advanced audience. Now,

Chrome Demands You Get Your HTTPS Together

by Jonathan Bentz @ Direct Online Marketing

  Last night (August 17, 2017 for those of you reading this from the future), an email notification was sent to a large number of users with access to Google Search Console accounts.    In the widely distributed notification, Google alerted Search Console users that the Chrome browser will begin showing security warnings on pages […]

The post Chrome Demands You Get Your HTTPS Together appeared first on Direct Online Marketing.

Twitter Promotion: How to Encourage Others to Promote for You

Twitter Promotion: How to Encourage Others to Promote for You

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use social media to promote your product, service or events? Are you wondering how you can use Twitter to help get more visibility and sales? To learn how Twitter can be used to encourage others to promote for you, this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast gives you insight into the subject. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, you'll discover five different ways you can use Twitter to promote what you have to offer. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Twitter Promotion Why Twitter promotion? I believe that Twitter is the most frictionless form of social media communication. You can also create an enormous amount of buzz on Twitter. Here are five techniques to help you promote and boost excitement around what you have to offer. #1: Include a Customized Tweet Button on Every Single Page of Your Product When you have several pages on your product, service or event site, it's important to have the same tweet on every single page. The first thing you need to do is create a custom Twitter share button. The button options available are Share a Link, Follow, Hashtag and Mention. You want to choose the Share a Link button. The next step is to click on the option to include a different URL, rather than the Use the Page URL option. In this particular case, you'll use the home page of your product, service or event. So when someone clicks on that tweet button to share on Twitter, they'll be directed back to one central place, which is your home page. The next option is Tweet Text. This is where you can write in your own custom tweet. Also make sure you check the Show Count option, because it will display the total number of tweets. You'll hear why it's important to show the number of tweets on your sales page, and the advantages to the Via and Recommend Twitter ID options. The last step is to add a hashtag. When you visit our event page for Social Media Marketing World, you'll notice that once you click on the tweet button, not only does it have our customized tweet, but it also includes the URL for the home page and the hashtag for the event. Once you have created your custom tweet, it'll give you a little piece of code that you can put in a sidebar widget if you're on WordPress, or embed the HTML where you want it. The good news is that it works over and over again. Here are a few tips on how to craft your tweet: Write the tweet as if the user was writing it him- or herself. Make sure it's not overly promotional. Craft it in a way that it's easy to read. Include a hashtag. Listen to the show to discover the types of phrases you should use in your custom tweet. #2: Embed a Twitter Widget on Every Page That You Use to Promote When you visit the event page for Social Media Marketing World, you'll see the widget below. On the event page it's live. You can see the hashtag at the top, and underneath are the tweets relating to the event. The reason that they're all in one place is because of the hashtag. As you scroll through the tweets, you'll see the people who have clicked on the custom tweet, plus those who are talking about the event in general. You'll hear why the value proposition in something like this on your sales page is huge, and the reason why I decided to have it on every single page at Social Media Examiner. To create a Twitter widget, you first need to log into Twitter and then visit here. Next, click on Create New and then Search. You will see that it asks for Search Query.

Facebook Video Retargeting for Live Video and Beyond

Facebook Video Retargeting for Live Video and Beyond

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you post videos on Facebook? Have you tried retargeting your live and uploaded videos? To explore techniques for retargeting your videos, I interview Amanda Bond. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Amanda Bond, who's known as the "Ad Strategist" specializing in Facebook ads. Amanda also advises top social pros and has taught the ADdicted Facebook Ads course. Online, she's known simply as Bond. Amanda explores Facebook video ads and retargeting. You'll discover how to use Amanda's technique to warm up your Facebook followers. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Video Retargeting for Live Video and Beyond Amanda's Story Before Amanda started working in social media marketing, she worked with big brands such as Pepsi and Labatt. As a salesperson for Pepsi, she went door to door to compete with Coke. After she sent two truckloads of Pepsi to a store for a large sale, Coke sent three. Looking over 110 pallets of pop, Amanda realized that the impact she was having in her sales role wasn't aligned with where she wanted to show up in the world. To move forward, Amanda decided to give back through her local Rotary service club. As the club's youngest member, she was encouraged to become their social media manager. When Amanda started working with her Rotary club in 2013, social media marketing felt like magic. Talking to people on the Internet seemed to create relationships out of thin air. However, Amanda quickly learned the impact of social when she used social media marketing for a live local Rotary event. To promote the event, the Rotary club used traditional marketing such as ads in the newspaper, and Amanda used everything she'd been learning about social media marketing. Throughout the weekend, the club expected 4,000 people to attend, but 23,000 people actually came, largely due to social media. That was Amanda's impetus to change direction in her career and she became a social media manager. As she became more versed in Facebook ads, she found that being an ad strategist was a great niche for her as a math and data nerd. Amanda now teaches and helps other businesses behind the scenes. She loves doing the deep dives into the data, helping people see the story the numbers are telling. Listen to the show to hear about Social Media Examiner's role in Amanda's early social media marketing efforts. What Retargeting Means The words retargeting and remarketing are interchangeable. Most people know about retargeting through the Facebook pixel, which is a tiny code snippet you add to your website. When someone lands on a page with this code, the Facebook pixel sends a message back to Facebook, saying something important is happening. Facebook has opened up new ways to retarget people (or show them content or ads based on prior actions), including video retargeting. Because Facebook has been emphasizing live video and video in the news feed, Amanda is especially excited about these video retargeting features. Anytime somebody sees at least three seconds of a video (recorded or live), Facebook takes note of who they are and puts them into a retargeting custom audience that you can use to retarget them again and again. I ask why you would want to retarget someone who watched a Facebook video. Amanda says it's part of getting people to know, like, and trust your brand. You want to start nurturing conversations that may lead to a sales transaction. As the Ad Strategist, she calls this framework "Connect, Convert, Close." In that connection phase, your audience may be cold (they may not know or have heard of you),

How to Create Social Media Videos on a Budget

How to Create Social Media Videos on a Budget

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want to add video to your social media content mix? Looking for ways to keep production costs low? Creating a video doesn't have to cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars in high-end production tactics like live actors or 3-D renderings. In this article you'll discover how to create and promote social media video on a budget. Listen to this article: #1: Decide What to Feature in Your Video Here are four ways you can create great video content without breaking the bank. Repurpose User-Generated Content A great example of repurposing user-generated content for a video comes from Coca-Cola, which leveraged their "Share-a-Coke" campaign into big corporate success. To incorporate this strategy in your own marketing, encourage your audience to tell their own stories on social channels like YouTube and Facebook using your campaign hashtag (which was #ShareACoke in the Coca-Cola campaign). You can then aggregate memorable content and repurpose it into broadcast-worthy video spots. While Coke launched its campaign around the Share-A-Coke idea, the soft drink giant tracked and grew their global efforts through the aforementioned hashtags. As a marketer, you can leverage readily available user-generated content and create a winning campaign even without a Coca-Cola-sized budget. Collect Royalty-Free Content The first step is to determine whether there is enough free content about your subject available online (the definition of "free" is content with no royalties). Resources like Flickr and YouTube are great places to start this research. If you want to do a viral video about lamps, for example, do a keyword search on Flickr for "lamps" and see how many compelling images you can find about the topic. Create Your Own Content If you feel that you don't have enough content available, you may need to simply grab an iPhone and snap your own pictures or record short video snippets. Marketing consultant and social media coach Mark Schaefer spoke recently on how he worked with a small family-owned winery in France and struck gold with a simple video called "How to Open a Bottle of Wine Without a Corkscrew." The video, without any paid media behind it, generated over 10 million views and catapulted the winery to stardom. One fascinating postscript here is that this video was amazingly successful when 221 other videos posted didn't achieve quite the same notoriety. Persistence is key here. Record Others Taco Bell generated 150,000 views on YouTube by simply recognizing a trending hashtag called "Drawing My Life" and then filming an artist as he drew simple thoughts about the brand. While Taco Bell certainly has the budget and the creative chops to create its own spots, hashtags, and launch campaigns, it's staggering to note how easily the fast-food chain generated buzz just by riding the coattails of another trend. Regardless of the type of video content you choose, the trick is to keep it simple. The reality of user-generated content or even self-generated content is that you immediately cut out thousands, if not millions, of dollars in cost. Additionally, from a branding perspective, you add a degree of authenticity to your voice by placing a true image of your customer in front of other customers. #2: Create Your Video So Taco Bell pulled off a great video with very little cost. The question is: How can you do it? Creating content that people actually want to see doesn't have to be difficult. If you create compelling content, users will engage with it in the form of shares, likes, comments, and even direct lead creation. You don't need extensive video editing skills, but those always help. You can use affordable editing tools like Adobe Premiere Pro to edit and build complex storyboards. If you're just getting started and don't want to invest in anything, you can use YouTube's free and quick Creator Studio,

6 YouTube Tips to Improve Your Search Rank

6 YouTube Tips to Improve Your Search Rank

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are your YouTube views falling? Do you need to rank higher in YouTube search results? Understanding how you can take advantage of YouTube's algorithm will help your channel and videos be seen by more people. In this article you'll discover how to make your video rank higher in YouTube search results. Listen to this article: #1: Align Content Development With Viewer Searches To get a leg up on your YouTube competition (which may be targeting irrelevant topics or subjects), find the exact words and phrases people use to search for content like yours on YouTube. You can use both free tools (like Keyword Tool and YouTube Trends) and paid tools (VideoCents and vidIQ, for example), to get insights into what people are searching for on YouTube. The paid tools give a bit more data, but their true value comes from providing a sense of how hard it is to rank for specific terms. Here's an example of some inline keyword insights on the word 'vine' from VidIQ. You're looking to find the sweet spot, where a keyword is getting a good number of searches but isn't overly competitive. What constitutes a good number of searches will vary by industry or market. After you've identified the best keywords, you can use them when creating and publishing your content. Create Videos People Search For Hank Green's SciShow searched for the most asked questions about science and created an entire series of videos to answer them. This tactic earned the channel millions of views across the series. Optimize Your Video for How Viewers Search For all its power, YouTube still finds it difficult to read video content, so you need to tell the platform exactly what your video is about. You do this through the video's meta data. If you use your keywords strategically (without spamming), you'll be much more likely to rank for your chosen keywords, as YouTube knows that your video is related to these terms. Include your keywords in the video title (as close to the start as possible), the description, tags and transcript file (the script should contain targeted keywords). Check out this example, which ranks #2 for the search term "video marketing." The keyword is visible in the title and description. You'll also find the keyword in the tags. It's even included in the subtitles. With strategic keyword optimization like this, it's no surprise that this video ranks so high for such a competitive keyword. #2: Maximize Video Watch Time Watch time is YouTube's most important ranking factor. It's a simple fact: If you don't have strong watch times, your videos will be demoted in search. Remember that it's all about what percentage of the video is watched, not just total minutes (though it's best to increase both). Michael Stevens of Vsauce is successful at getting his YouTube audience to stick around. Even though his videos are over 10 minutes long, they routinely log hundreds of thousands of views. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O2jkV4BsN6U He gets straight to the point in answering the title question, and uses his personality and intelligence to pique people's curiosity again, steering the conversation to a different but related topic. Take a cue from Michael and consider removing long intros and outros. Get people to watch more of your video, and YouTube knows that you're providing value to those viewers. YouTube will reward you by suggesting the video to more people and ranking the video higher in search. #3: Drive Longer Channel Sessions This may seem like a no-brainer, but try to get people to watch more than just one of your videos. All channels want this of course, but not all of them actively encourage viewers to watch more videos. This tactic has more benefits than meet the eye. If your channel consistently starts people off on long YouTube sessions (even if they go off and watch videos on other channels), your channel will be rewarded by YouTube's algorithm,

SEO: The Beginner's Guide to Search Engine Optimization from Moz

SEO: The Beginner's Guide to Search Engine Optimization from Moz


Moz

New to SEO? Need to polish up your knowledge? The Beginner's Guide to SEO has been read over 3 million times and provides the information you need to get on the road to professional quality SEO.

17 Tips for Successful Facebook Contests

17 Tips for Successful Facebook Contests

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you planning a Facebook contest? Want to make sure it's a success? An easy-to-follow checklist of tips and best practices will help you launch Facebook contests your audience will love. In this article I'll share 17 tips to make your Facebook contest a success. Listen to this article: #1: Review Facebook's Terms of Service Facebook periodically changes its rules and regulations about contests and other promotions. Be sure to check the Facebook Guidelines page before you launch your contest. #2: Set a S.M.A.R.T. Goal A S.M.A.R.T. goal is one that's specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and timely. Make sure you clearly define your contest's goals before you start planning. Do you want to promote a new product? Grow your email list? Perhaps you're looking to gather a bunch of user-generated content such as photos and videos. To set your Facebook contest up for success, focus on one or two attainable goals. #3: Choose the Contest Type Consider running caption, photo-vote, video-vote, and sweepstakes contests, which are always popular on Facebook. Sweepstakes are the easiest to enter and the key to driving lots of entries is to pick the right prize. Del Mar Fans & Lighting's straightforward Facebook giveaway requires entrants to simply vote on which lighting product they prefer. Once they vote, they're entered. When the contest ends, a company rep will choose a winner at random. Remember, you need to develop a contest that will help you reach your goals. Try a photo- or video-vote contest if your goal is to collect user-generated content. #4: Select the Right Software Figure out what software you need to run and manage your contest. Look for software with built-in voter verification features, so everything is on the up and up. If you want to collect email addresses or other contact information, use third-party software that will help you organize all of the data you collect. If you'd like to increase engagement, run a Facebook timeline contest. Choose a comment/like importer tool that allows you to collect a Facebook user ID number and name from everyone who engages with your post. Whatever type of contest you choose, remember you can use the information you collect for future marketing efforts.  #5: Set a Time Frame Decide how long your contest will run and let your audience know. Companies offering valuable prizes, like a trip to Paris for two, tend to let contests run for longer periods of time than those offering smaller or local prizes, like a meal or a one-night stay in a hotel. Some companies even do a weekly or monthly giveaway. Palmer's Canada recently ran a "Celebrate the New Year Giveaway," during the month of January. At the top of the rules document, the contest period is listed, right down to the time zone. How long your contest runs is up to you. Just make sure you share the time frame in all of your promotions. #6: Create Rules Write a description of how the winner will be chosen, such as randomly or by community vote. For example, BroadStreet Publishing hosted a 21 Days of Love Valentine's Day giveaway. In the rules they state that "a winner will be chosen at random," among other considerations. Consider including a rule that says voting is only part of the process, and a judge or panel of judges will determine the final winner. Make sure to include a line stating that if you suspect fraud, you have the right to determine the winner. #7: Determine Who Can Enter Are you a local business hoping to increase foot traffic to your store or restaurant? Consider limiting entries to people who live within a 50-mile radius of your business. You can also specify age ranges and even gender in your contest rules. KLIM, a company that makes technical outdoor apparel, is looking for women to model its clothing. In the contest rules, they specify that they want family-friendly images and "No duck face selfies."

What Is a Title Tag, and How Do You Write One?

by Mindy Young @ Online Writing Jobs & Freelance Content Writing Opportunities | The Official Online Writing Jobs Website

For those who are new to SEO writing, there can be a little bit of a learning curve, even if you’re already an experienced writer. You need to learn things like how to find and incorporate authoritative links, how to

Dealing With Unhappy Customers: What Social Marketers Need to Know

Dealing With Unhappy Customers: What Social Marketers Need to Know

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Does your business respond to customers via social media? Are you prepared to deal with upset customers? To discover how to turn unhappy customers into happy fans, I interview Jay Baer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Jay Baer, the author of Youtility, co-host of the Social Pros Podcast and founder of Convince & Convert, an agency and blog focused on digital marketing. His newest book is Hug Your Haters: How to Embrace Complaints and Keep Your Customers. Jay will explore how to convert social media haters into raving fans. You'll discover why it's important to hug your haters. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Dealing With Unhappy Customers The backstory of Hug Your Haters The idea of customer service and customer experience has been at the front of Jay's mind for a long time, he explains. His company Convince & Convert helps major brands with their social media and content marketing, and they increasingly get involved in issues with customers. It's not just about being proactive and doing marketing, Jay says. You have to be just as good, if not better, at reactive customer service. Jay found even organizations with a lot of resources were befuddled by everything related to digital customer service and experience in the modern world. Jay shares how conducting a tremendous amount of research with Tom Webster from Edison Research changed the focus of his book. Last year at Social Media Marketing World, Jay did his "Hug Your Haters" presentation for the first time. Although he has taken the Youtility concept all over the world, Jay says the Hug Your Haters book is the best thing he's ever done and the speech is the best speech he has ever given. Listen to the show to learn what Tom Webster said he liked about Hug Your Haters in the forward to the book. What are haters and why do people hate Jay refers to anybody who complains about a business either off stage or on stage as a hater. An off-stage hater is somebody who complains in private: on telephone and email. An on-stage hater is somebody who complains in public: social media, review sites, discussion boards and forums. He shares that historically and even currently, the majority of people complain off stage but that the pendulum is swinging the other way because it's much easier to reach out to a brand on Facebook, Twitter or beyond than it is to send an email or wait on hold. When people complain off stage, they almost always want an answer. They have a problem they want to be fixed, and 90% of the time they expect companies to respond. When people complain on stage, they don't necessarily want an answer; they want an audience. They want people to empathize and engage with them around their experience. If they actually hear back from the company, it's a bonus. Even though only 47% of the people who complain in public actually expect companies to get back to them, Jay says their research proved that if you actually answer the person who had a bad experience and left a review online, it has a meaningful and significant impact on your customer advocacy. Listen to the show to discover how content shock also applies to disgruntled customers. Why engage haters Jay says haters are not the problem, ignoring them is. He believes there are multiple benefits to answering every complaint in every channel every time, instead of what most businesses do today, which is answer some people some of the time in the channels they prefer. First, if you answer somebody, you at least have a chance to turn them around.

How to Track the ROI of Your Video Marketing

How to Track the ROI of Your Video Marketing

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you struggling to measure the ROI of your marketing videos? Looking for tools to help track sales from your videos? A simple framework and a few tools can reveal if your video campaigns are working for you. In this article you'll discover how to track and measure the ROI for your video marketing efforts. Listen to this article: #1: Outline Your Campaign Costs Take the time to do a complete breakdown of all of the projected costs of your video marketing campaign, including the marketing hours you'll spend promoting it. Include a buffer of at least 20% of your projected expenses if you manage the campaign on your own. This buffer will be used for unexpected costs, such as having to reshoot footage or invest more in editing. Keep in mind that there are video marketing companies that offer all-inclusive video marketing packages, and this can make doing a cost outline much easier and more effective. #2: Determine the Financial Tipping Point Think about how many sales you need to make from your video marketing campaign to break even. After you reach your break-even amount, everything else will be pure profit. But first you need to determine that amount. You can make this a very simple process. For example, if your video marketing campaign has a budget of $5,000 per month, you should expect to see your monthly sales go up by more than $5,000. If your average sale is $100, you already know that you'll need to make at least 50 sales to compensate for the cost of the video. You should track your sales (and other metrics) year-over-year in addition to month-by-month to make sure that you've adjusted for any seasonal changes. #3: Track Sales From Your Video Campaign That's all easy enough, but now you need to differentiate income from your video campaign from income from other marketing factors. To distinguish your video campaign from other marketing factors, you can always track people who flow from your video and go on to make a purchase. Do this by using web tools to embed links that are specific to your videos. Keep in mind that these won't track all of your sales. There will always be people who see your video and make a purchase later on or in a non-traditional way, so you'll need to inflate your sales slightly to get a true ROI. The benefit, naturally, is that you'll know that your video made you at least that amount of money. Use any one of these tools separately or combine them for more complete video marketing campaign analysis. Brandwatch makes it easy to quantify your company's brand awareness. Through this tool, you can identify brand sentiments to see if your campaign is working and whether you're building brand awareness in a positive, meaningful way. Clicky allows you to break down website visitors into marketing demographics and track their activity live. If you're hosting your own videos (rather than uploading them through a service), this is an ideal way to get a better picture of your audience. Audience demographics can be critical in determining not only your ROI and awareness, but also why a particular strategy may not be working (you're targeting the wrong demographic entirely, for example). Wistia offers one of the most advanced video analysis suites available. Not only does this tool provide demographic information, but it can also directly track engagement. You can see how long visitors watched and what actions they took when they finished watching. This includes any purchases that they may have made. Wistia can integrate into your sales funnel and give you critical information about optimizing your video marketing results. YouTube offers analytics such as YouTube Insights that will break down your viewership by demographic and track outgoing clicks. You can embed marketing prompts directly into your YouTube videos so you can funnel your viewers directly into a sales channel. #4: Improve Your Video Marketing Campaigns

4 Little-Known Tools to Curate and Publish Content

4 Little-Known Tools to Curate and Publish Content

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Is curated content part of your social media marketing? Looking for new ways to collect and share curated content? New tools are changing the way marketers compile and deliver handpicked content to their social media audiences. In this article you'll discover four unique ways to curate social media content on Medium, Twitter, SlideShare, and your blog. Listen to this article: #1: Select Stories on Medium Medium is a great platform for marketers because it allows you to distribute content quickly. You can write long-form articles, short pieces and tweets, and upload videos to share with the Medium community. When you publish articles, they're shared with your followers and a network-wide feed where people find content based on tags and the amount of engagement posts receive. Medium also offers a content-curation opportunity that many people overlook. You can create your own publication and curate articles from authors around the web. To create a publication, go to the Publications page and click New Publication. From there, fill in the details for your publication and design the layout. You can choose the layout style (Grid, Stream, or List) and how many stories to include on the homepage. To curate content, search Medium for articles that are aligned with your publication's message. If your publication is about satire, for example, research "satire" and look for relevant posts. Once you find an article that you want to republish, scroll to the bottom of the story and click the ellipsis icon. Then select Request Story from the drop-down menu and choose the publication you want to publish it to. Once you've selected the publication, you'll see a request email to send to the story's author. If the original author decides to let you use the story, they will submit it to your publication. You'll receive an email from the author, and can click through to the story. From there, click on Edit at the top of the page then click on the Publish button. Now the story is added to your publication. #2: Collect Tweets on Twitter Some of the most popular Twitter accounts don't necessarily share their own content. They seek out the best articles, videos, pictures, and stories related to a specific topic and share them with followers. To curate content on Twitter, you can share links or curate tweets from others. The first approach is the most popular. You find links to content online and share them as tweets on your account. The second approach is to use Twitter's Curator platform. With this tool, you type in a few keywords, hashtags, or individual users and Twitter will deliver the most relevant or engaging content in a real-time stream. Once you've identified content you want to curate, you can publish your curated content directly to Twitter. #3: Clip Slides on SlideShare SlideShare recently rolled out their Clipping tool, which lets you clip and save the best slides from presentations to view or share later. It's a great way to keep curated content organized by topic so you can deliver only the best insights. To get started, sign in to SlideShare and click My Clipboards in the SlideShare navigation bar. On the next page, click Create a Clipboard. Now enter a name and brief description for your clipboard and choose whether to make it public or private. Your clipboard name should be related to the story you're going to tell with your slide collection. Once you've saved your new clipboard, it's time to find slides to add. When you're browsing SlideShare and find a slide that you want to save, hover over the top-right corner of the slide and click Clip slide. The slide is then added to your clipboard. Once you're satisfied with the content you've curated, you'll want to organize your content to tell the story in a compelling way. Include some of your own slides in the clipboard to achieve some of your objectives.

Freak Success: A Dialog With Chris Brogan

Freak Success: A Dialog With Chris Brogan

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you feel like you don't fit in? Are you wondering how you can succeed in business by being different? To learn about how your unique qualities can help you achieve success in the business world, I interview Chris Brogan for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Chris Brogan, publisher and CEO of Owner Magazine, co-author of The Impact Equation and host of The Owner's Mind podcast. His latest book is called The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth. Chris shares why some freaks are successful in business and how you can follow their lead. You'll discover how to face your fears, run with your ideas and put them into practice. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Freak Success The motivation behind the book and who the freaks are Chris says that it was his children who were the motivation behind his new book, The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth. He explains the reasons why he believes that neither of them is suitable for real employment, and therefore wrote the book for them. During the process, he realized that it doesn't only include his story of how he was a freak who never fit in, but there are a lot of people out there exactly like him. Chris believes that there is an economic shift that's close to happening, and that cottage industries are coming back in a world of Dollar Shave Club. A lot of people aren't necessarily saying "I hope IBM hires me," they want to forge their own path. An example is Jake Thompson who has an apparel brand called Compete Everyday, which is a similar premise to Life Is Good. You'll hear Chris' definition of the word freak, and why they choose their own adventure. Listen to the show to hear Chris' story about the original Choose Your Own Adventure books. Why some freaks are successful in business and others are not Chris explains why Richard Branson is successful for being a freak. One of his very first businesses was a company that sold records in the UK. When he told people he would distribute records overseas, he discovered that he could get them for a lot less money. So he went on to resell them in the UK and undercut all of the other retailers. He has since gone on to own 400 successful companies, lives on an island of his own creation and has been knighted. You'll discover why Richard Branson is Chris' biggest business idol. A true freak is someone who stays true to what they are passionate about, even if they don't fit within the box. Then you have people who are weird for weird's sake. This is the type of person who looks for attention, but it's not really who they are. Chris gives an example of violinist Lindsey Stirling, who is doing extremely well. She has 2.3 million likes on Facebook and has a huge group that follows and connects with her. Although what she does has no part in modern pop culture, she has stuck with her love of the violin and brought her own energy to it. It's a way for her to put her own story out there. The freaks who are successful actually stay pretty close to who they are. They have something to offer and help others at the same time. One way to find out if you're a freak is to consider the quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson, "Do not go where the road may lead, but go where there is no road and leave a trail." You'll find that people react differently to it. Some people find it too scary to think about. Listen to the show to find out why most people want instructions and feel fear if they hav...

Social Media: The Key to Surviving the Evolving SEO World

by Gary @ Hacked By 0x1999 - Indonesian Code Party - Jatim4u

Google’s bias for their own services has many people rethinking their SEO strategies. It even begs the question of whether SEO is still worth the effort.

Despite the seemingly disheartening future of SEO, I share the opinion of many who …

Social Media: The Key to Surviving the Evolving SEO World was originally posted on the Phoenixrealm SEO Blog by Gary Cottam.

You can connect with Gary on Google+, on Twitter @garycottam, or follow these links to find out more about Doublespark SEO or Doublespark Web Design.

The Most Effective YouTube SEO Tactics for Guaranteed Video & Website Traffic

by Guest Post @ SEO Design Solutions™ Blog

YouTube is by far the most popular video-sharing sites today. Your business stands to benefit greatly from a YouTube presence in that: YouTube only comes after Google & Facebook when it comes to daily visits. Billions of videos are viewed every month on YouTube, meaning there is a very high chance that your video will Read More

SEO for Idiots: The 10 Basics of Blogging Search Engine Optimization

SEO for Idiots: The 10 Basics of Blogging Search Engine Optimization


Blog Tyrant: Start a Successful Blog

Last Update May 30th, 2016 Recently Kelci asked me over on my Facebook Page about SEO for idiots. I decided to do a full post on it (isn't she lucky?) because it is such a cool and expansive topic. So what exactly was her question? Found your blog the other day and have learned MUCH more than the previous 100 blogs I had found combined. I see that you have an article about SEO secrets below but I was wondering if you can direct me to like an 'SEO for idiots' type of thing... I really need to understand the

Instagram Business Profiles: Why Marketers Should Upgrade

Instagram Business Profiles: Why Marketers Should Upgrade

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Have you considered moving to an Instagram business profile? Wondering what advantages you'll gain? To explore Instagram business profiles, I interview Jenn Herman. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Jenn Herman, a social media consultant and Instagram marketing expert. Her blog, JennsTrends.com, has placed in our top 10 social media blogs three different times. She also wrote an ebook called The Ultimate Beginner's Guide to Instagram. Jenn explores Instagram analytics. You'll discover valuable Instagram business profile features. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Instagram Business Profiles The Instagram Algorithm The Instagram algorithm came out last year and Jenn explains that for marketers, the algorithm is helpful. You can use it to get better reactions from, engagement with, and reach to your target audience. Jenn stresses that the Instagram algorithm is more personal than the Facebook algorithm. On Facebook, when something is really popular, Facebook is more likely to show that content to more people. However, the Instagram algorithm is based on personal use, not public use. Instagram users don't necessarily see someone's content just because others engage with it. That said, the Instagram content that each user engages with most does show up higher in his or her feed. To make the Instagram algorithm work for your marketing efforts, Jenn recommends sharing the best content for your customers and followers. When you emphasize quality over quantity, your users are more likely to stop, engage, comment, like, and so on. As a result, your followers will constantly see your content higher in their Instagram feeds. Also, Jenn says the Facebook and Instagram algorithms re-sort content differently. Facebook constantly re-sorts content, whereas the Instagram algorithm doesn't. Instead, on Instagram, the re-sorting is based on how often you post and how often a user logs into Instagram. For example, if a user logs on and then logs on three hours later, Instagram re-sorts only the content uploaded in the last three hours. The content that appeared during the user's last login appears exactly as it did before. For marketers, this approach to re-sorting means that your Instagram followers won't miss your content if they scroll far enough through their feeds. For example, say someone follows Social Media Examiner and likes to engage with its Instagram posts. The user logs in after 24 hours and Social Media Examiner has posted three times. In this case, Jenn says the user will see Social Media Examiner's three posts higher in his or her feed, but not necessarily back to back. I ask what marketers can do to encourage fan activity and make their content seen first. Jenn says the key is having better content and (counter-intuitively) posting less content. When you post a lot, Jenn says it's more difficult for that content to show up high in your followers' Instagram feeds. People are more likely to skip your posts. However, gorgeous posts can create a strong connection with your followers and people are more likely to engage. To increase the chances people see and engage with your Instagram posts, Jenn recommends posting your best content three times a week. Also, Jenn suggests adding calls to action. In a text overlay or caption, encourage people to leave a comment or tag friends in the post. The algorithm will see that engagement. I ask Jenn how the algorithm applies to Instagram Stories versus the Instagram feed. Jenn says that at least for now,

6 Steps to Updating Your Social Media Profiles During a Rebrand

6 Steps to Updating Your Social Media Profiles During a Rebrand

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you need to update your social identity? Are you looking for a simple way to make sure all your social channels are consistent? In this article you’ll discover a checklist that will help you rebrand your social media profiles. Listen to this article: #1: Give Your Audience a Sneak Preview Some companies purposefully keep their rebrand under wraps until the last minute. While this shock-factor approach will likely generate press, it can be risky if people react badly. To stay on the safe side, give your audience a sneak preview of your rebrand. To do this, post something from your new company (your new logo or images from a new marketing campaign, for example) on social media. Announce the change and ask people what they think. This makes your audience feel like you value their opinion and allows you to gather feedback before launching the rest of your rebrand. It also gives your audience time to adjust to the idea, and you'll generate anticipation and excitement for the launch. In the example below, Cultures for Health uses a sneak preview photo that offers enough information to generate excitement, without giving it all away. Once you've launched a new visual identity, it's a good idea to get feedback on what your audience thinks about it. This isn't about whether people like your logo; it's about more tangible things that can affect revenue. Is your new blog easy to navigate? Does your audience relate to your brand story on social media? You can post a quick survey on Twitter or Facebook to ask these questions and then use the results to make improvements. #2: Update Your Social Media Profiles Have you designed a sleek, modern visual identity to accompany your rebrand? Great! Now it's time to show it off. Be sure to update your profile photos and hero photos on all of your social media accounts or add them to new accounts if you've completely scrapped the old ones. This isn't just about profile photos. It's about making sure your social media sites visually represent your company's new identity. For example, you may need to change your Twitter theme to match your new colors. Or you may want to create a new Pinterest board showcasing elements such as your packaging design or imagery. In addition to standard social media profiles like Facebook and Twitter, make sure you edit review sites such as Yelp, Foursquare and TripAdvisor. If you don't have a presence on these sites, now is your chance to create one. If you're a B2B company, you might have reviews on sites like Capterra or G2 Crowd. You also might have a presence on directories like Angie's List, so it's important to be thorough with this search, no matter your industry. It will only add to your brand consistency and boost awareness. You also need to update your social media profile handles. This seems like a no-brainer, but you'd be surprised how many companies get this wrong. When creating new social media usernames, here are two important points to keep in mind: Choose a handle that's spelled correctly and arranged sensibly. This makes it easy for users to locate your new accounts. It also makes your account names more memorable, which means your audience will be more likely to engage with you. Create a consistent social media name across all channels. Before you do this, make sure your desired handle is available on each social platform. You don't want to change half of your usernames only to find out another company already owns it on one channel. #3: Revamp Your Google Business Page If you don't have a complete Google Business profile, you could be missing out on opportunities for new customers. Make sure your Google Business page is up to date with your most current information so local customers can easily find you. The first thing you want to do is create a customized URL. Then add photos or images and include information about your company such as your address,

5 Ways to Partner With Influencers on Snapchat

5 Ways to Partner With Influencers on Snapchat

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want to increase your company's visibility on Snapchat? Have you considered partnering with influencers? Snapchat influencers can help you connect with your target audience in a creative and entertaining way that improves awareness and messaging. In this article you'll discover five ways to partner with influencers on Snapchat. Listen to this article: Why Partner With Snapchat Influencers? Snapchat influencers are self-made, modern-day digital celebrities who are creative, passionate, and entertaining. They were the early adopters of the platform and inherently understand how it works. They're skilled with the native tools and understand the importance of the channel's animated lenses and emojis. Influencers know how to connect with their audience and their opinions are trusted. You'll find them across all industries including fashion, sports, beauty, health and wellness, home décor, food, and more. Make sure you do your research to find the right influencers for your brand's demographic. Here are some ways you can partner with Snapchat influencers to promote your business. #1: Share Access to Exclusive Events You can partner with Snapchat influencers at all price points to provide access to different kinds of events. This in-the-moment storytelling allows you to show fans a different side to your business than images that are curated and photographed for print. Influencers bring their fan base into the experience, which ultimately leads to more brand awareness and sales. At New York Fashion Week, many top fashion brands enlist Snapchat influencers to cover their collections. Tommy Hilfiger uses Millennial models who are also social media influencers to showcase behind-the-scenes aspects of the brand's shows. Their Snapchat stories include models getting their makeup done, practicing their walks, and getting fitted for the runway. #2: Drive Traffic to Your Website DJ Khaled, the most well-known Snapchat influencer, has over 2 million followers who passionately follow his adventures and listen to his daily life lessons, or "keys." Not only does he inspire and motivate his audience, but he also monetized his user base by opening an ecommerce store and partnering with global brands like Ciroc and Apple Beats. He incorporates sales tactics in Snapchat stories by intertwining his daily keys with the products he showcases. As Snapchat content is ephemeral, the best way to drive traffic to your website is ask influencers to use the text box to write out your website or company name. This is what DJ Khaled does when he's promoting something on Snapchat. Provide the text so the influencer can copy and paste it to his or her Notes app and add it to the snap. This way, you can include more content than what is allowed by the platform. You may also want to direct the influencer to ask his or her followers to screenshot the snap so they have the information readily available. Since the influencer is telling a story, the call to action can be verbal. People are already captivated, so they'll follow the steps to purchase your products. #3: Spread Awareness for a Cause You can reach out to influencers to help with your philanthropic campaigns. They're usually receptive and their reach can have a strong impact. Since it's for a good cause, many influencers will support the campaign free of charge. Influencers are often keen to work with non-profits because they want to help create change in the world. It also gives them an opportunity to add their own personal spin to the story. There are a lot of Snapchat influencers who excel at telling stories through artistic talents. One of the most famous is Miologie. She brought awareness to Nigeria with her creative work for the #BringBackOurChildhood UNICEF campaign. Her storytelling involved the character of Badamassi, a young boy who had taken refuge but missed the environment and the animals he grew up aro...

4 Tips for More SlideShare Leads

4 Tips for More SlideShare Leads

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you use SlideShare? Wondering how to generate leads from SlideShare? With the right design and content, your SlideShare presentation can become a powerful lead-generating marketing tool. In this article, you'll discover four simple steps for creating a SlideShare presentation that people can't resist. Listen to this article: Why SlideShare for Lead Generation? The great thing about SlideShare is that the platform generates over 70 million visitors a month, and 5 times more traffic from business owners than Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and LinkedIn. This means there is a ton of potential for you to redirect some of those valuable visitors back to your site. #1: Look to Others for Guidance It's important to understand what's already working for others on SlideShare before you spend too much time putting together a deck that no one wants to look at. To begin, search SlideShare to see what some of the most popular slide decks look like, and understand which elements you should replicate in your own decks. For example, if you're trying to get people to participate in an Instagram class you're promoting, you can search the social media category in SlideShare. Flip through some of the slide decks you see and make notes on the following to guide your own SlideShare deck: Cover slide elements Number of slides in each deck Font size and the number of words per slide Color scheme Title Types of content in each deck (slide deck, infographic, document, etc.) How and when images are used Tone of the language #2: Craft Your Content Before you start copying and pasting chunks of text into a PowerPoint template, take a minute to think about what pieces of information are absolutely crucial to your audience's interests. Carefully consider the angle you're going to use to engage people. How will you encourage people to click through your presentation to the end? In addition to text and images on your slides, consider uploading infographics or other documents that might be interesting to your audience, as in this example from Jay Baer's deck How Fast Is Fast Enough? Here are some points to keep in mind when designing your presentation: Start With an Outline An initial outline should quickly break down the text you want to include in your SlideShare. Keep it brief. Most SlideShare presentations have between 30 and 60 slides. If each of your slides has a 100-word paragraph on it, you no longer have a slide deck, you have a novela. Instead, aim to limit the text on each slide to the length of a tweet. Story is important. If you want your presentation to succeed, it has to present an intriguing angle. Want to do a presentation about how to use Facebook Live? Try positioning it as, "The Worst Ways to Use Facebook Live." Inject Personality Have a conversation. Talking directly to your readers is a great way to build trust and hold their attention. Ask questions they're likely to ponder, then continue to answer those questions. Use humor. For some reason we've been conditioned to act serious and professional all the time. But the honest truth is, people get bored easily. Humor is a very powerful tool and can boost people's opinions of you. It makes you likeable. When people like you, they're more likely to listen to and trust you. If your readers trust you, you can tell them what to buy. See what I'm getting at? Teach Your Audience The primary purpose of a SlideShare should be to teach your audience something they don't know. Showcase your expert knowledge on SlideShare and you'll get leads and traffic. Offer immediate value. Include points that offer actionable and useful tips for the reader, as in the example below from Peg Fitzpatrick's The Art of Social Media: Power Tips for Power Users. People should leave the SlideShare having learned something. You'll want to avoid general takeaways and focus on sharing valuable tools,

Engagement: How to Create a Loyal Audience That Loves You

Engagement: How to Create a Loyal Audience That Loves You

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Is audience loyalty important to your business? Are you wondering how you can increase your audience loyalty through engagement? To learn the importance of engagement, I interview Danny Iny for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Danny Iny, author of Engagement from Scratch! He is also the founder of Firepole Marketing (now Mirasee) and host of the Connect, Engage, Inspire podcast (now the Business Reimagined podcast) . Danny shares his techniques for increasing engagement, which engenders loyalty in his audience. You'll find out how to define engagement in your business, the benefits of it and how to get started. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Engagement From a writer to someone who specializes in engaging audiences Danny shares that he has been writing since childhood, and started a copywriting business when he was young. In 2006, he wrote his first book, Ordinary Miracles: Harness the Power of Writing to Get Your Point Across! In the book, he discusses his ideas about writing and how to write well. Although it's a great book, Danny didn't get the response he was looking for. The lesson he learned is that when you write copy, it's not actually about the words. You need to understand the people you want to connect with, and understand what matters to them. Danny's copywriting practice evolved over time into a marketing and strategy consultancy. You'll hear what happened when he attended local networking sessions that made him want to create a training program. Danny soon discovered that people who didn't have an audience wanted to know more about engagement; and therefore, he wanted to help them. He started to reach out to all of the experts who had built an engaged audience from nothing. With their input and perspectives, his new book, Engagement from Scratch! was created. Listen to the show to find out why it's important to be sensitive to other people's needs. Definition of engagement Since his latest book was published, Danny says that he has developed the insight that engagement is about the deep emotional investment that people have in what you are doing. If you think about Apple's customers, they are members of the Apple tribe. The fact that they use Apple's products actually says something about who that person is. It's a piece of their identity. Not only are these customers incredibly engaged, they are also invested in what Apple does. If the company were to betray the values they stand for, the response would be dramatic. They would feel like a friend had betrayed them. Danny says that the best model for conceptualizing engagement is by increasing the feeling of commitment through rewards over time. When someone discovers you for the first time, there is no connection, relationship or engagement. You have to give them something to keep them coming back. Make sure you give people an opportunity to provide you with their name and email address. Once they commit, you can reward them. You'll find out another great way to get people to invest some of their time and attention, which will help you build a relationship with them. It's important to stand out from the competition, and one way to do this is to answer emails personally. This puts you in a whole different category. To be a good email marketer, you need to have a double opt-in, a one-click Unsubscribe button and a high content-to-pitch ratio.

How to Make Better Facebook Video Ads

How to Make Better Facebook Video Ads

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Have you tried Facebook video ads? Looking for better ways to connect with your Facebook audience? Small adjustments to the way you design and target your Facebook video ads can increase your engagement and conversions. In this article you'll discover seven tips to improve your Facebook video ads. Listen to this article: #1: Tailor to Audience Preferences Rather than create content that targets a wide audience, focus on creating videos that target a specific audience segment. These videos are more likely to get clicks to your website, shares, comments and likes. For example, if your website offers several services or products, create a video for one specific product or service rather than your business in general. General videos are good for branding but not for businesses focused on direct response. You can use Facebook Audience Insights to find out who your audience is, if you aren't sure already. To access Audience Insights, log into your Facebook Ads account, click Tools and select Audience Insights from the drop-down menu. Choose the audience you want to know more about (for example, people who like your page). Analyze people who like your page, people in a remarketing list and people who are in an email list you uploaded to Facebook. Based on the data you collect about your target group, you'll get a clearer idea of the type of video to create. In the bottom left, select your Facebook page to see information on that page. From here you can explore demographics, such as age, gender, lifestyle, relationship status, education level and job title. You'll also see page likes (what pages your audience likes), where your target audience is located, how active they are on Facebook, composition of their household and more. Combine the data on each tab, and you can create a full target audience profile. For example, households with an income of $250K+ are more likely to buy luxury items, and households with many family members are more likely to purchase in bulk. #2: Capture Attention Quickly Successful videos get to the point right away. You need to catch the attention of your audience in the first 5 seconds. Here are a few ways to achieve this goal: Grab attention with a catchy start, like in this Friskies "Dear Kitten" ad. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G4Sn91t1V4g Tell people that you can solve their specific need. Hint at what you're going to talk about. Most videos are muted unless the user clicks on the audio button. This means that you need to complement the audio with a supporting visual so the first 5 seconds help you achieve good performance. Keep in mind, too, that Facebook is a social platform, so viewers are likely to skip videos that are too commercial. #3: Create Ads That Don't Look Like Ads When users visit Facebook, they're typically taking a break or finding out what their friends are up to. They're not surfing to buy. To attract the attention of Facebook users, your ad needs to deliver its message through something unusual such as insightful information, funny content or news. This isn't easy to do, but it's the best way to create videos that achieve your goals. Depending on where your ad appears, what customers consider valuable will differ. Always' #LikeAGirl Campaign does a great job of appealing to their target audience: women. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XjJQBjWYDTs #4: Keep Runtime and the Message in Mind Lengthy videos aren't as effective as shorter ones because people are more likely to stop watching them. Many online advertisers recommend that you create videos that are about 30 seconds long. If your video is particularly entertaining and builds value for users, you might be able to go up to 2 minutes long. There are a few cases where long videos might work. For example, users already know your brand and like your content. Also, if the video is useful or entertaining,

How to Perform a Detailed Analysis of Your Social Media Competitors

How to Perform a Detailed Analysis of Your Social Media Competitors

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want better results from social media? Have you considered researching your competitors? If you're not getting the results you want from social media, a little research and the right tool can help you refine your social media strategy. In this article, you’ll discover how to perform a detailed competitive analysis and improve your social strategy. Why Competitor Analysis? Competitor analysis lets you discover how your competitors use social media. You can see how your competitors position themselves on social media, what they share and how their audience responds. You can also find out what social media networks work best for your competitors, what information you should include in your social profile and page bios and what types of status updates get the most engagement. Listen to this article: While you can gain these insights for free on your own, it takes time to find multiple competitors' social accounts, collect all of the data (followers, engagement, etc.) and then analyze that data. To show how using a tool can help you gather the data more quickly and present it in an easy-to-analyze format, this article uses Rival IQ as an example. Now, let's look at how to do social media analysis and apply what you learn to improve your social media strategy. #1: Create a Landscape With You and Your Competitors To get started, you'll want to sign up for a free 14-day trial of Rival IQ's service. If you're just doing a one-time analysis of your competitors' social media strategy, you should be able to get it done before the free trial period ends. Otherwise, you'll want to choose a plan that best fits your needs. For each company (including your own), you'll be able to analyze and monitor one account per social network (Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagram and YouTube). Once you set up your account, create your first landscape by clicking the + button under the Landscape drop-down menu at the top left. In the dialog box that appears, enter the name for your landscape and click the Create Landscape button. Next, enter the website address for your company and select it from the drop-down list if it appears. Then click the Add to Landscape button. This will allow you to compare your social media presence and content against your competitors'. After Rival IQ confirms that your company has been added, continue adding your top competitors. Enter each competitor's website address and click the Add to Landscape button each time. When you're finished adding companies, click Done Adding Companies. When you click Done, your screen will refresh to show your landscape's dashboard. Rival IQ will confirm the accounts it has found for your company and your competitors. If the companies are new to their system, it might take a little while to update, but usually no more than 24 hours. If you know that one of your competitors has an account on a network that Rival IQ didn't find, you can hover over it and suggest it to them. They'll usually add it within 24 hours. In the above example, the only accounts Rival IQ didn't find were the ones that didn't exist for the specified companies. Once everything is set up, you're ready to start your analysis. #2: Find Social Engagement Opportunities Begin your analysis with the social networks where your competitors have profiles and pages. This should tell you at a glance if you're missing a network that might be beneficial for your social media strategy. In this case, you might assume that out of all of the networks, Instagram is the least important because a few of your competitors don't have a presence there. But that might not always be true, which you'll see shortly. In addition to seeing what social networks your competitors are on, check to see which ones they have the largest audiences on. You can do this by clicking the Cross-Channel link in the left sidebar and then clicking on Detailed Metrics at the to...

Google AMP: What Bloggers Need to Know

Google AMP: What Bloggers Need to Know

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Have you heard of Google AMP? Want to know how it will impact your blog? To discover more about Google AMP and the future of blogging, I interview Leslie Samuel. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Leslie Samuel, who runs BecomeABlogger.com, where he teaches people how to blog with purpose. He's also host of the Learning With Leslie podcast and head of training for Social Media Examiner's Social Media Marketing Society. Leslie will explore Google's Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) project and what it means for bloggers. You'll discover how to install Google AMP and related plugins on your WordPress blog. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Google AMP What is Google AMP Google AMP stands for Accelerated Mobile Pages, and is a collaboration with a number of tech companies. Its goal is to improve the performance of websites on mobile devices, which in turn improves user experience. Kissmetrics did a study, which found that 40% of mobile users leave a page if it doesn't load in three seconds. When that happens, these users don't see the publisher's ads, products, services, or events. AMP pages load 10 times faster and use 10 times less data. Plus, when people view a website on a mobile device, pop ups (such as ads and opt-in boxes) take up the entire page. There's such a small amount of real estate on a smartphone, the pop-ups really inhibit the user experience. Google has already started placing Google AMP pages above non-Google AMP pages to mobile users in search. If you do a search for any popular topic, like politics, on your smartphone, only sites that have accelerated mobile pages enabled will show up in the top stories section. This is just the beginning. In the future AMP will be even more wide-spread. Listen to the show to learn how the Facebook Instant Articles feature is similar to Google AMP. Pros and cons of AMP In addition to the benefit of preferential treatment in search, AMP's faster load times should decrease website abandonment and increase content consumption. Before discussing the cons, Leslie noted one thing in terms of how AMP is set up. When someone clicks on an AMP enabled article on their mobile device, "/amp" is added to the URL, essentially creating a second link. (For example, a Social Media Examiner article with AMP would have the URL socialmediaexaminer.com/ARTICLE-TITLE/amp.) There are now two links: the original link from the desktop article and the second from mobile (with /amp at the end), which is what Google will show above the initial version. The AMP project is able to speed up websites because it strips away a lot of the unique elements, such as style sheets and JavaScript, that make a website look and function in a specific way. AMP sites have specific standard dimensions, and elements such as sidebars, headers and comments are gone. However, there is still a lot you can do with design, Leslie explains. For instance, you can change fonts and colors, add a logo, and more. It just will not be as extensive as what you have on your website. Articles with AMP show a single column that holds both text and images, so people won't see anything you promote in the masthead and sidebar on your regular, desktop website. Leslie says while the AP version of some sites may not be as advanced as the desktop experience, they still look pretty nice. For example, The Washington Post has a simple top with their logo. Then, when you scroll down, you see other posts, social media links, and so on.

Marketing Reboot? Are You Ready to Change?

Marketing Reboot? Are You Ready to Change?

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Is your business ready to face the technological and sociological changes that are happening right now? To learn why you need to consider rebooting the way you market in this rapidly changing world, I interview Mitch Joel for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Mitch Joel, author of the book Six Pixels of Separation and the podcast with the same name. His newest book is Ctrl Alt Delete: Reboot Your Business. Reboot Your Life. Your Future Depends on It. Mitch shares how technology will change the way we market our businesses in the future. You'll learn the most important trends and how they will impact your marketing. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Marketing Reboot What's the business world going to look like for our young children, when they enter the workforce? Mitch shares how the iPad has only been around for the last three and a half years, and so for us to even think about what life will be like in a decade is unfathomable. He believes that in current business, with the catalyst of technology, we've gone through exponential growth. Mitch says that as human beings we find it difficult to understand this dramatic shift. Since the iPad has come along, it has imploded the PC market. Our children will know nothing but technology. It's changing the lives of people and the state of business. Listen to the show to find out why Mitch questions why anyone would download content and keep it on a hard drive. Why we need a reboot In the preface to Mitch's new book, Ctrl Alt Delete, he says, "during this state of purgatory, many businesses will die and many jobs will disappear, but in the same breadth many businesses will thrive, many new businesses will be created, and many new jobs will be invented." Mitch shares his story of when his agency, Twist Image, first started out in 2000. The idea was to create a modern marketing agency focused on technology and connectivity. You'll discover what type of people they now hire compared to back then and see how the acceleration has kicked in over the last 5 years. As far as education goes, Mitch feels that we're not educating young people properly. He believes that we're not setting up an infrastructure for the world as it exists. As a professional marketer, you'll need to look at how we connect with things, engage with brands and engage in our lives. Mitch explains what he means by reboot and how marketing professionals are not grasping it. They tend to still hold onto the old ways in which they buy, sell, create and engage with media. You'll discover why Mitch believes the book is a wake-up call and why it's not forward-looking. Listen to the show to hear the five movements that have already happened that have shaped business and changed the way we work. How has the seemingly ubiquitous adoption of social media led to the need for businesses and marketers to change? Mitch feels the most important element is the intrinsic connection we now have. For example, when you see two young people shopping in a mall, they aren't just two good prospects for your store—they're more like 1,002 prospects. Young people today have about 500 connections on Facebook, where they chat, share and text. They create a connected society that we've never had before. Mitch feels that social media, a platform of connectivity, has been a major factor. The adoption has been so intense that he's not sure if marketers or even the peopl...

Facebook Live: Why Live Video Matters for Marketers

Facebook Live: Why Live Video Matters for Marketers

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Have you tried Facebook Live video broadcasting? Want to know what it means for your business? To discover how to use Facebook Live, I interview Mari Smith. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Mari Smith, the world's leading Facebook marketing expert. She co-authored Facebook Marketing: An Hour a Day and is author of The New Relationship Marketing. Mari has also teamed up with Facebook to assist in educational events. Mari will explore Facebook Live, how it works, what it means for marketers, and much more. You'll discover tips to set up your Facebook Live broadcast. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Live What Is Facebook Live? Facebook Live is like Periscope, Meerkat, MeVee, and a few other apps that let you stream live video from your mobile device. Mari loves Facebook Live because whether you use the live-streaming feature with your personal profile or your page, you have a built-in audience. When you go live, the video goes out in the notifications and in the news feed and gets great organic reach. Mari believes Facebook Live video is great for marketers because it gives the ability to create a intimate, authentic connection with your audience. It humanizes and personalizes your brand. She clarifies that you don't need to download anything extra to stream with Facebook Live on your profile; it's part of the Facebook iOS app. Mari points out that Live is different from Facebook Mentions, which is only available to verified Facebook users. At the time this episode was recorded, all iPhone users had Facebook Live on their personal profiles in the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, New Zealand, Japan, and most English-speaking countries. On February 26, 2016, Facebook announced they'd opened Live to more countries, as well as Android users. Listen to the show to hear about Mike's first experience with using Facebook Live. Facebook Live for business Mari says when you use Facebook Live through your personal profile, you get to choose the audience. You can broadcast to the public, friends only, a specific friends list, or just a few friends. Since one of the keys from a business perspective is to broadcast live and then share it to your page, you want to go with a public broadcast. Then once it's been shared to your page, you can boost the post to reach a wider audience. When asked for examples of people using Live, Mari shares that Guy Kawasaki uses Live regularly from his page to show equipment or where he is and what he's doing. She also points to Robert Scoble, who uses Live regularly from his profile to do tech updates. Mari says she really enjoys what Carol Tuttle is doing. Carol does a Blog Talk Radio show that she simultaneously broadcasts on Facebook Live, and then hosts on iTunes as a podcast. From her Facebook Live post on her page, she shares the iTunes subscription link and the show's call-in number. Mari shares that she watched fitness expert Christine Dwyer live-stream her turbo kickbox jam class. Christine set up the camera on a tripod and pointed it into the mirror, so viewers were able to see the scope of the room and Christine teaching the class. She had a very nice, engaged audience. Mari is quick to remind listeners that while she's sharing great examples, the idea is to focus more on the application of Live and how people can use it within their industry. For example, Doreen Virtue, one of the top experts on angels, uses Facebook Live broadcasts on a regular basis to give people special messages....

Establishing Trust: How to Build Relationships With Social Media

Establishing Trust: How to Build Relationships With Social Media

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Are you wondering how to best build a platform with social media? Do you want to learn how to build trusted relationships online? To explore how to establish trust with social media, I interview Chris Brogan for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Chris Brogan, CEO of Human Business Works and author of several books including The Impact Equation. Chris shares his experiences in building trust online, and the importance of having a blog if you want to grow the reach and exposure of your business. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Building Trust, Online How social media has changed Chris talks about his views on how social media has changed over the last 3 years. He shares that when he co-founded an event called Podcamp in 2006, he believed podcasting and video blogging were going to change the world. You'll hear Chris share what matters today in social media and how he feels podcasting has recently made a comeback. He explains that email marketing isn't dead—it's bad email marketing that's dead. Instead we need to be more personable and relationship-minded. Chris describes how platforms have come and gone and why it's community that really matters. Listen to the show to find out why community has stayed the same since Chris started. How to make your social media audiences count Chris talks about why only having a Twitter feed is like living in a hotel room and thinking you've made it. He shares the reasons why we need a place to call our own. Chris explains the importance of having a blog or a website. You need to have a "primary home base," as it's the ultimate centerpiece that you need to use any social platforms. If you don't have one, you're throwing away your opportunity for business and influence. Listen to the show to find out how Chris's blog has attracted business opportunities. How to obtain "reach" Chris shares how the larger structure of The Impact Equation is the idea that if you have really good goals, they will drive unique ideas. Next, you need a platform where people can see those ideas. You need a human element or a network of values. You need people who care about the information you share online. These are the components of social media success. Chris explains his definitions of reach and exposure. He describes ways of achieving audience capture. When you have a basic website but don't have an email newsletter, you have a passive connection to your audience. When you only have a Twitter account, you have a very passive connection with your audience. This is because people don't know how to get back to the "meat" of what you're saying. Listen to the show to find out great ways to increase your reach. How to gain trust online Chris shares the common problems people face when it comes to being human across the web. We are born looking for faces and need to see people on the other side of our communication. You'll hear why your "About" page is relevant and it's not just about logos. Chris explains how historically business was based on face-to-face networking and the difference now that things are moving online. Chris talks about the "comma problem" and how marketers can improve their email pitches. Learn why it's not simply about pressing the +1 on complete strangers. As Guy Kawasaki said, "Nobody is from nowhere." If somebody is of value to you, you find ways to express that and it'll go a lot further than hitting the +1 button.

How To Do Keyword Research and Keyword Analysis For SEO

How To Do Keyword Research and Keyword Analysis For SEO


SEO Nick

The goal of this post is to approach keyword research for SEO from it's roots and build toward the more technical aspects.

Getting Found Online - 13 SEO Tips to Increase Your Website Traffic - Inbound Rocket

Getting Found Online - 13 SEO Tips to Increase Your Website Traffic - Inbound Rocket


Inbound Rocket

Learn the basics of SEO! This complete guide to SEO basics for beginners covers keyword research, on-page optimisation, technical considerations and more.

How to Optimize Your Facebook Posts With Facebook Audience Insights

How to Optimize Your Facebook Posts With Facebook Audience Insights

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want to increase your Facebook engagement? Interested in discovering what content appeals to your audience? With Facebook Audience Insights, you can get the information you need to tailor content to your audience's preferences. In this article you'll find out how to use Audience Insights to optimize your Facebook posts. Why Facebook Audience Insights? Facebook Audience Insights is a social media marketer's dream come true. It was designed as a tool for targeting Facebook ads, but it also provides a treasure trove of data on your current audience, target market and competitors' customer bases. Listen to this article: Simply plug in your page or a heap of desired demographic data, including age, gender, location, interests, finances, employment, income, family structure, purchase behavior and more. Here are some ways to tap into this data to optimize Facebook posts for your audience, increasing organic reach and engagement without advertising. #1: Use Lifestyle Data to Create Personas The Lifestyle data in Audience Insights creates mini-personas based on demographic data, purchase behavior, brand affinity and interests. Though the personas are rather broad, they lay the foundation for a comprehensive picture of who your audience is. The Apple Pie Families lifestyle persona comprises 7% of the U.S. Facebook audience over age 18. Facebook defines this persona as "upper-middle class couples with school-age children . . . homeowners, often minivan drivers and avid radio listeners." From this snippet of information, you can picture the lives of this audience. You can envision parents driving their children to school in the morning, listening to the radio. After family dinners, the children retreat to their rooms to do their homework on weeknights. You can speculate these are parents who are highly present in their children's lives. They are involved, informed, and in some ways, defined by their status as parents. So how does this information translate into writing posts that will capture this audience's attention and motivate them to act? You do it on their terms. Consider what is likely on their minds right now, and how your brand can assist in quelling their anxieties and make their life better overall. When it comes to audience personas, it's all about framing. Say you're running a promotion. Could you adjust the timeframe and the scope of the promotion to frame it as a back-to-school campaign? Or more broadly, how could the campaign speak to the everyday joys and challenges of parenthood? For example, the largest Facebook audience segment for Kraft Foods is Apple Pie Families. In this August post the company includes a link to kid-friendly recipes. Understanding that at the time, a large segment of the audience was likely focused on sending the kids back to school, Kraft Foods adjusted their content not only to grab their audience's attention, but also to provide information people could put into action. #2: Gauge Interests and Affiliations With Page Likes You can learn a lot about an audience segment based on the Facebook pages they like. Think of this information less like a report on other businesses and more like a key interest breakdown. The Page Likes section of Facebook Audience Insights is comprised of the top pages liked in each category and the pages most likely to be relevant to your audience. This combined data helps you continue piecing together a comprehensive persona. Page Likes let you see insight into what your audience's political affiliations are, which media outlets they follow, where they shop, what organizations they support, what apps they use and more. From a macro perspective, study this data to get into the heads of your audience. Add to the picture you started to form from Lifestyle data. What do these people talk about with their friends? How do they spend their spare time? What issues do they care about?

Your Website Needs Internal Links… Here’s How to Automate It!

by Jeffrey_Smith @ SEO Design Solutions™ Blog

I know it’s been quiet on our blog, but, just to let you know….we’ve been busy creating our new [10 Video] Advanced SEO Training Series for SEO Ultimate and SEO Ultimate+ so that people can really see the power of this amazing All-in-One solution for WordPress. I’ve added a teaser video above where I show Read More

Content Marketing: How to Attract People With Content

Content Marketing: How to Attract People With Content

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use content marketing for your business? Are you wondering how to attract customers with your content? To learn about the power of content marketing, I interview Joe Pulizzi for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Joe Pulizzi, founder of the Content Marketing Institute, the Content Marketing World conference and author of the new book, Epic Content Marketing. Joe shares why a content marketing strategy is important for your business. You'll learn how content marketing works and what you need to do to get started. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Content Marketing The latest video by Chipotle Mexican Grill and content marketing Chipotle's recent video called The Scarecrow has been viewed more than 5 million times. The essence of the video is a scarecrow who works for a big corporation that's in the business of processing food. He soon realizes that he doesn't like the world he's in and decides to make things using healthy alternatives. At the end of the video, Chipotle has included a video game for viewers. Their brand is only mentioned at the very end for a few seconds. It's received a lot of press. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUtnas5ScSE Joe says that it pulls at the heartstrings a bit and if you can do that in marketing, it's great. This isn't the first time Chipotle has done this. They did Back to the Start in 2011, which was a similar movement. You'll discover why in 2011 Joe would have said this was creative marketing/advertising and why today it's an approach to storytelling. And now it's fully fledged content marketing. The story is bigger than Chipotle, as they don't talk about their products or services. Joe believes more of this type of content marketing will be seen in the future. One of the keys to content marketing is consistency. You need to take a 24/7 approach to telling stories to attract and retain your customers. This is exactly what Chipotle has done. They found their bigger story and began a movement around it. Although considered long for a YouTube video at 3 minutes 23 seconds, Joe believes that if you tell a story it doesn't matter how long it is. You'll hear why Chipotle agonized over whether to include the chili pepper in the video, which is part of their brand. If you think about what stories you can tell, they should not be about you but rather something you stand for, which will make a difference in your customers' lives. Listen to the show to find out why Chipotle's goal was to get their video out into social media. How content marketing works Over the last 50 years, advertisers interrupted people's attention with their advertisements. Today's content marketing is not about distracting the customer; it's to attract them with useful content. You need to provide valuable, relevant and compelling content and deliver it consistently. People then grow relationships with you because they see you as the trusted source for that particular content. This can then lead to sales. It can look like a daily blog, a podcast, a quarterly magazine, a weekly newsletter or even a TV show. You have to be the producer of the content and create an asset. Content marketing happens when businesses start to think like publishers and deliver compelling content to a defined readership. You should position yourself as the go-to resource in your industry. Listen to the show to find out why most people aren't set up as publishers.

We’re hiring: Technical SEO Analyst position

by Pure Visibility @ Pure Visibility

Pure Visibility is looking for an experienced Technical Search Engine Optimization Analyst to join our growing company. Our team members are committed to providing great, responsive service to clients and coworkers alike. In our open, collaborative work environment, we help and learn from each other proactively—in a world of dynamic digital marketing, knowledge can’t flow quickly enough through cubicle walls.

The post We’re hiring: Technical SEO Analyst position appeared first on Pure Visibility.

How to Increase Awareness, Generate Leads and Create Advocacy With Social Media

How to Increase Awareness, Generate Leads and Create Advocacy With Social Media

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Have you been tasked with generating more awareness, more leads and more advocates? Need a plan to get you started? In this article you'll discover how your business can use social media to achieve three of the most common marketing goals. #1: Increase Brand Awareness Perhaps your brand isn't a household name and you'd like more prospective customers to know who you are. Social media can help you get there. Here are some ways to jumpstart your brand's presence through social media: Listen to this article: Establish fully fleshed-out profiles on the major social networks. Create company profiles on the big four social channels: LinkedIn, Facebook, Google+ and Twitter. Make sure your company logo and bio are consistent across all of your social sites. Decide which social network you'll spend the most time on. Depending on your market segmentation and customer research, it might make sense to spend more time on one network and less on others. For example, LinkedIn is consistently the best social outlet for B2B lead generation, and Google+ tends to attract professionals in the technology space. Consider advertising. When you first sign onto a social network, you don't have any connections because no one knows you're there. One way to make yourself known is through advertising. Each social network has intriguing ad options (like media-rich Twitter cards and Facebook sponsored posts) that help you target the prospects who will most likely click through and get to know you. Create a content schedule. Consistency is key in social media. Before you start posting, create a content schedule that allows you to develop your brand story one social post at a time. Give content creators access to the calendar so they know what to contribute and when. Make connections with others. Depending on the network, start following others in your industry who have important and insightful things to say. Obviously, you won't follow competitors, but think laterally. Bloggers, thought leaders, academics and companies in related industries might be putting out great content, and be open to socially engaging with you. And that comes with the bonus of a bigger presence for your company. Track important key performance indicators (KPIs). Only by tracking certain metrics can you know if your social efforts are paying off. Decide which metrics you'll evaluate on a regular basis, ranging from the number of likes and shares of your material, to more telling metrics like web traffic, social media conversion rates and reach. Make sure you have the right social media management tool on hand to walk you through your stats. Once you've set up a content calendar, perhaps done some advertising and are ready to track predefined KPIs, you'll have a solid foundation for spreading awareness of your brand. Your audience will then get a chance to see how your products and services can change their business practices. Perhaps they'll see the light through an interesting YouTube video or a report that speaks to a particular problem and your solution for addressing it. However you make your customers' lives better, social media puts you out there and brings your solutions to your prospects' doors. #2: Generate Leads and Engagement Now that people are starting to know you exist, it's time to turn people into leads. As in all content marketing, you'll want to develop social content that speaks to your audience. This is content that your followers will find informative, helpful and even exciting. When you've improved things just a little bit for people, they'll come back to you for more of the same, and that's your chance to qualify them as leads. Here's how to put together social content that turns followers into leads: Create content that inspires conversation. On social media, you can't depend on passive followers to convert themselves. You need to create as many opportunities to engage people as possi...

Why Do Companies Underfund SEO?

by Jill Kocher @ Practical Ecommerce

Search engine optimization is often underfunded and misunderstood. When resourced appropriately, however, it can produce a cycle of positive performance that keeps building. The most common reason that organizations tend to ...

The Writer’s Guide to Local SEO

by David Rosam @ Writing For SEO

How to Nurture Leads Using Medium Letters

How to Nurture Leads Using Medium Letters

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Wondering how to use Medium for business? Want to use Medium to engage with prospects? Medium’s Letters feature lets you communicate directly with prospects so you can build meaningful relationships with them. In this article you’ll discover how to use Letters on Medium to nurture leads. Why Medium Letters? More than just a place to publish long-form content, Medium is a social network with built-in content distribution benefits. When you connect your Medium account with your Facebook and Twitter profiles, all of your followers and friends who are on Medium automatically become your Medium followers, so you'll gain an instant audience for your content. Listen to this article: A key difference between Medium and other publishing platforms is a feature called Letters. Letters are the same as stories, except they're emailed to your followers. Depending on your followers' preferences, they may receive a daily or weekly email digest that includes the latest content from the publications and people they follow. Letters takes this one step further, allowing you to send content directly to your followers' inboxes as stand-alone items. Getting access to people's inboxes is a big deal, so Letters represents a major opportunity for marketers. As Seth Godin puts it, "Permission Marketing lets you turn strangers, folks that might otherwise ignore your unsolicited offer, into people willing to pay attention when your message arrives in an expected, appreciated way." Here's how you can use Medium's Letters feature to nurture sales leads with useful, compelling content. #1: Develop a Content Strategy When you think about your Letters content strategy, consider the relationship that this content will have with your other Medium assets. Ideally, your Letters should be more conversational, engaging, and shorter than your other stories on Medium. This type of content is most likely to perform well as a stand-alone email. You could syndicate an existing long-form post as a letter, but remember that your publications followers may have already seen this content if they follow your hosted blog or other social channels. It's best to think of Letters as something different, offering useful content beyond what people can access elsewhere. Letters unlocks your audience' inboxes, so you need to handle this privilege with care. Follow the same guidelines you always do and provide real value to your readers. Remember that with Letters, your followers can unsubscribe whenever they want, just like with traditional email marketing channels. #2: Compose and Send a Letter If you don't have a Medium account, here's a great guide for getting started on the platform. Once you're logged in, navigate to your publication's homepage. (You won't be able to access Letters from your author account because only publications can send letters.) Click the down arrow next to Following and select Letters from the menu. Now you can write the content that will go out to your followers as an email. You can use all of the same layout and media-embedding features that are available for any other type of story on Medium. Once you've completed your draft, click Email Preview, which allows you to see what the letter will look like in your followers' inboxes. If you need to make any changes to your letter, you can go back to the editor and make them. Once the letter is ready for dispatch, simply click Send, and it will go out to all of your subscribers. After you send the letter, it will also be visible in your publication's feed. #3: Engage With Your Prospects Because your letter has the same features as a regular Medium story, users can interact with it just like anything else on the site. They can discuss, mark up, and recommend your letter to other users, so keep an eye on the activity. Reply and interact with your readers to learn more about them and what they like.

Visual Content: How to Create Shareable Images People Love

Visual Content: How to Create Shareable Images People Love

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use images in your social media marketing? Are you interested in finding ways to create more shareable visual content quickly and easily? To learn how to create shareable images that enhance your social media marketing, I interview Kim Garst. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Kim Garst, CEO of Boom Social, a social media marketing consultancy. Kim's also an expert in using visuals for social media marketing. She's the author of a new book, Will the Real You Please Stand Up: Show Up, Be Authentic, and Prosper in Social Media. Kim explores visual content and how it can enhance your social media marketing. You'll discover the importance of using visual content in your social media marketing; the different types of visual content you can create for your brand or business; and the best tools, apps and resources for creating visual content at your desktop or on the go. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Visual Content Marketing What is visual content marketing? Visual content marketing is a way to use images, rather than words, to communicate a message about your business, product or service. Visuals are a snackable way to express ideas. Visuals are a huge part of social media and they continue to evolve. People are so busy today. Images catch their attention and are quicker and easier to process than text as they scroll through a social media feed. Beyond leveraging social media platforms typically known to be visual (Pinterest and Instagram), Kim also looks for ways to implement visuals and eye-popping graphics in her Twitter content strategy and on her blog. Listen to the show to discover more ways to leverage visual content in your social media marketing.  The importance of visuals for social media marketing  From a social media marketing standpoint, the old saying that "a picture's worth a thousand words" holds so much value today. As marketers, we all need to be or become storytellers. A great photo or graphic tells a story in one hot second. We live in such an information-overloaded space right now and attention spans are so short. Text-based marketing alone has become less and less effective. The brain processes visuals 60,000 times faster than text. A good image can connect an idea or message much quicker and stronger than text-only content. Listen to the show to find out other amazing stats for the effectiveness of visual content on what your audience will process, learn and retain.  Different types of visuals you can create  There are five primary types of visual content you can create for social media: videos, photos, creative images, infographics and slide shows. Kim explains that comics, memes and infographics tend to be hugely popular on social media. Comics and memes are a way to showcase humor. They're fun and relatable, so people are eager to share them with their friends and family. According to Kim, businesses that use infographics probably have a 12% higher growth rate than companies that don't. Infographics offer a visual way to share a lot of interesting content in one image. People love them too. The most popular place to get more bang from your infographics is on Pinterest. People share them there like mad. Another great place to leverage infographics is on blogs. An infographic doesn't necessarily have to be complex to be appealing and effective. For example, if you have a blog post that's about 10 ways to do something, then you could repurpose your blog content and very easily make an infographic on those 10 ways.

Ranking Factors SEOs and Website Builders Cannot Afford to Ignore

by Gary @ Hacked By 0x1999 - Indonesian Code Party - Jatim4u

Ranking well in search engine results pages is not a matter of luck. If you do not know which factors are significantly affect a page’s rank, then you can bet that your site won’t make it to the first page …

Ranking Factors SEOs and Website Builders Cannot Afford to Ignore was originally posted on the Phoenixrealm SEO Blog by Gary Cottam.

You can connect with Gary on Google+, on Twitter @garycottam, or follow these links to find out more about Doublespark SEO or Doublespark Web Design.

Twitter Cards for Blogs: How to Set Them Up

Twitter Cards for Blogs: How to Set Them Up

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Have you heard of Twitter cards? Are you wondering how you can use them for your business? To learn about how Twitter cards can be beneficial to your blog, this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast goes deep on the subject. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode you'll discover the different types of Twitter cards available, how to set them up and what to tweak in order to have more customization. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Twitter Cards for Blogs What is a Twitter card? A Twitter card is a way for you to add more text and images to your tweets. Twitter cards give you a lot more options than you get with an ordinary tweet. With a normal tweet, you can upload an image that has to be rectangular. If it isn't, Twitter crops the top and bottom for it to fit. When you create a tweet with an image, the default is displayed on Twitter.com and on mobile apps. Tweets with images do not support Twitter cards. They are completely separate. Twitter cards work similarly to how Facebook pulls in default information from a post when you paste a URL into Facebook. It pulls in an image, a headline and some text. Listen to the show to hear why I believe Twitter cards only work on Twitter.com and their own mobile app right now. How a Twitter card works If you go to Twitter.com and go to a Twitter account that has Twitter cards enabled, you'll see the option to View Summary in the bottom right of the tweet. With Twitter's mobile app, you have to click on the tweet to see the Summary card. You'll hear the advantages and disadvantages of this one-click process. One of the benefits you get with a Twitter card is the amount of content you can add. You get 70 additional characters for the title, and 200 additional characters for your description. When you click on View Summary in a tweet, you'll notice that below the tweet is where your additional content appears. There's also the ability to include images. You can even include tall images. For example, I was able to display an image that was 480 x 580 pixels within a Twitter card. Listen to the show to find out what information you can include and what is powerful if you have a multi-author blog. Twitter card benefits for bloggers There are three types of Twitter cards that work well for bloggers. These are the Summary card, the Summary card with large image and the Photo card. 1. The Summary card is the default that most bloggers will likely choose. It shows a small image that's offset to the right, and all text is below it. This is very similar to how Facebook works. 2. The Summary card with large image is a better option if you have nice big images on your blog. The difference here is that the large image is above the content. When someone hits View Summary, they will see the large image before the additional information you have included. 3. The Photo card is essentially the same as the Summary card with large image, except it doesn't have the summary. Instead you just see the photo with a headline. To see a Photo card in use, you can check out Mashable on Twitter. At Social Media Examiner, we use the Summary card and we use the Summary card with large image for My Kids' Adventures. Listen to the show to discover how the images you create for Facebook Open Graph on your blog can also be used for Summary cards. How to set up a WordPress blog to work with Summary cards First of all, you need to install the WordPress SEO by Yoast plugin.

How to Repurpose Your Facebook Live Videos

How to Repurpose Your Facebook Live Videos

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you using Facebook Live? Do you want more mileage out of your broadcasts? Reusing your Facebook Live video can help improve your impact and visibility. In this article, you'll discover how to download and repurpose your Facebook Live videos on other social media platforms. Listen to this article: #1: Download From Your Facebook Profile Facebook Live lets you broadcast a live-stream video from your phone. If you've live-streamed a great video you'd like to keep, follow these steps to download the video file from your Facebook: First, log into Facebook.com and go to your profile. Next, locate the Videos tab below your profile's cover photo (along the bottom of the image or in the More drop-down). Now, click on Videos to see a list of videos you've posted to your profile. Next, click on the thumbnail of the Facebook Live video. After the video opens, click on Options (along the bottom of the video) to reveal the menu to download it. Once you click the Download option, your stand-alone video will open. Right-click on the video and select Save Video As to save the video as an MP4 file to your computer. #2: Download From Your Facebook Page If your Facebook page is lively, the steps below are your best route to download your Facebook Live video from your page. Note: You must be an authorized manager on the page to access the options below. Let's get started! Once you complete a Facebook Live video from your page, you have a few optimization options to increase the reach and purpose of your post. (The options below are presently only available for Facebook Live videos streamed from a Facebook page.) First, log into the Facebook page you used for your Facebook Live post. Next, click on the Publishing Tools tab along the top. In the left-hand column of tabs, click on Videos to see a list of your page's posted videos. Find and click on the Facebook Live video you wish to download. Look for the Video Details pop-up window. Along the bottom, you'll see any posts related to your video. Click on the post link to uncover additional optimization and download options for your video. In the bottom-right corner of the Post Details pop-up window, find and click on the Edit Post button. To optimize your Facebook Live video from the Basic tab, add titles, tags, and custom thumbnail images. From the Advanced Tab, you can also choose to allow or prevent your video from being embedded in an external website. In addition, you can upload a Closed Captioning file to your video for access by the hearing-impaired. Next, look for the gear icon above the top-right corner of your video's image. Click the gear icon and select which version you want to download. If you just went live from your page in the last day or two, there's a slightly faster way to find the download option. This brief video will show you how to quickly download your most recent live video. #3: Repurpose Your Facebook Live Videos The show doesn't stop once you click Finish and Post in your Facebook Live broadcast. While your video post can reach far and wide on Facebook, you can push that reach even further after the video has wrapped up. Upload Your Live Video to YouTube or Vimeo Once you've downloaded your Facebook Live video, you can upload your video to other video hosting sites or channels to reach a wider audience. If you upload it to YouTube, you can even use YouTube's simple video editing tools to trim your video down to the moment(s) you want to keep and share. Don't forget to use YouTube's features to add a branded watermark, action cards, a description, and tags. Share Your Live Video With Newsletter Subscribers If your email newsletter could use a shot in the arm, add your Facebook Live video into your next issue. Personify Leadership shot partner interviews at an international conference and later used the Facebook Live videos to inform newsletter subscribers.

Pinterest Traffic: How to Use Pinterest for More Exposure

Pinterest Traffic: How to Use Pinterest for More Exposure

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you want to drive more traffic to your site with Pinterest? Are you looking for ways to improve your Pinterest exposure? To explore how Pinterest can help your business I interview Pinterest expert, Vincent Ng. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Vincent Ng, host of the Pictures to Profits podcast and author of Pinterest Marketing: How to Search Optimize Your Pins and Boards for Pinterest. He's a Pinterest expert and blogs at MCNG Marketing. Vincent shares how to use Pinterest to drive more traffic to your website. You'll discover reasons why you should use Pinterest in your social media marketing, tips on images and plugins that can boost traffic to your site and provide social proof for your company and what you need to know about Pinterest's smart feed and promoted pins. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Pinterest Traffic How Vincent got started with Pinterest While Vincent has successfully used Twitter and Facebook for his social media clients, he found neither site could drive much traffic to his blog. Curious about Pinterest's rapid early growth, he explored the site and discovered a fair amount of traffic going to his blog from it. That is when he decided it was the site he needed to be on. Vincent has been on Pinterest since its beta stage four years ago and has witnessed how much the platform has changed and evolved since the beginning. Listen to the show to discover the major changes and trends Vincent has witnessed on Pinterest. Reasons to consider Pinterest for your marketing People are naturally drawn to attractive, magazine-quality images. Information can be processed very quickly when it's seen as an image or picture. Pinterest makes it possible to leverage beautiful, shareable images to drive more traffic to your site. You'll hear Vincent describe how to lay out your images to get the most impact and reach from Pinterest. Pinterest is also a powerful way for users to discover things they might not have expected to find. It's become a visual search engine for products and can link items together based on how they've been previously pinned or searched. Vincent shares how many people bypass Google and go directly to Pinterest to search for products and lifestyle topics because the content is curated by actual users and the results tend to be high quality. Listen to the show to find out how Pinterest's visual recognition engine links related products to be searched and discovered. The biggest mistakes people make on Pinterest The biggest mistake businesses make on Pinterest is neglecting to redirect the source of a pin back to their site. The source is the URL where you want users to be directed when they click on your pin. You could potentially get hundreds of pins and repins on your image, but you lose the opportunity to grow your blog with Pinterest if you don't link directly to your site as the source of the pin. Listen to the show to learn how to edit your image to redirect where you would like your pins to point users. The Pinterest smart feed and what marketers need to know about it The Pinterest smart feed is a new algorithm based on the quality of the pin, the quality of the pin's source (blog or website) and relevance of pins. Each factor is measured based on the number of users who link to the specific pin or the source. High-quality images and the most popular sources are given preferential treatment on Pinterest's feed. It also boosts pins from people you follow and will suggest related pins based on what's pinned...

Content Creation Hacks: How to Quickly Produce Valuable Content

Content Creation Hacks: How to Quickly Produce Valuable Content

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you create content for your business? Looking for an easier way to make your content work for you? Discover easy ways to create and repurpose your content, courtesy of Nick Westergaard. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Nick Westergaard, host of the On Brand Podcast and chief brand strategist at social and content agency Brand Driven Digital. Nick is also the author of Get Scrappy: Smart Digital Marketing for Businesses Big and Small. Nick explores easy ways to create quality content. You'll also discover how to repurpose recent and historical material. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Content Creation Hacks Nick's story Westergaard Advertising began 35 years ago in Iowa when Nick's father and now business partner started what was a small, general, traditional advertising agency. Nick had worked with brands in the early days of online marketing, specifically for educational publishing companies when digital really started to grow. About 10 years ago, Nick started moonlighting as a freelancer for the family business. Eventually he would come in as a partner. In addition to changing the kind of work Westergaard Advertising specialized in, they morphed into brand-driven digital to help organizations build better brands online through social media and content marketing. Nick's book, Get Scrappy, came from a phrase he found himself saying often. Nick does a lot of public speaking, and says it was one of those experiences where he quickly dashed off a title for a new speech. Then when it came time to write it, the topic took root and excited him. Plus, he was able to draw on work he did with clients of all shapes and sizes. "Get Scrappy" was a common thread. Whether it's an entrepreneurial startup, solo small business, medium-sized business, or a larger marketing team, everybody's looking to get scrappy – to do more with less. For instance, Nick talks about working with nostalgic brand Schwinn Bikes, and how it's easy to think of them as a big brand, but they're really a small, scrappy team at the headquarters in Madison, Wisconsin. Nick talked with them about this idea of getting scrappy. Schwinn's social media manager Samantha Hersil summed it up best. "We could all use a few people and a few dollars more," Hersil said. That's really at the heart of the book. Listen to the show to discover how Nick's business has changed over the last 10 years. Why marketers object to creating content Content is a tricky animal, Nick explains, so it takes a content marketing mindset. Some of the obstacles marketers encounter are from lack of a sound content strategy. The Content Marketing Institute reports that many people fly blind when it comes to content strategy. It's both an obstacle and an internal objection, because companies are just jumping on the content marketing bandwagon. Both in terms of social channels and content, Nick thinks it's easy to fall into the trap of what he calls "checklist marketing." Marketers do everything they hear about: they have a presence on every network, create every form of content, and so forth. Nick thinks if people instead develop a strategy with a business objective, their content will be better aligned with their business. Content used to be driven by the written word, Nick explains. As people scoot up to that podcasting microphone and hit the Record button with video, they get scared. There's a ripple effect, as well. Subject matter experts may feel like they're not interesting enough, or else they believe they have interesting stor...

5 Steps to Improve Your Customer Service Using Twitter

5 Steps to Improve Your Customer Service Using Twitter

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do your customers use Twitter to ask questions and request support? Need a better way to manage your Twitter support? By following the steps in this article, you'll deliver a superior customer service experience on Twitter. In this article, you'll discover how to create a better Twitter customer service process for your business. Listen to this article: #1: Create Internal and External Policies Create two policies: one to clarify what's expected from internal staff, and the other to address customer expectations and how to ensure their concerns are being heard. Some key considerations and questions to answer include: What Is the Journey When People Tweet You or Your Brand? Think about the entire journey from the tweet to response and then action. Without someone constantly monitoring Twitter, it can be very easy to miss tweets sent to your brand. How Will You Respond and What Will You Say? Customer service can be tricky. Often tweets are sent from heightened states of emotion. Before reacting, set up an internal policy for team members to outline how to react to any tweets that are time-sensitive, have delicate subject matter, or involve a complaint. Decide whether to discuss customer concerns within Twitter or move them offline. Twitter's tweaks to its direct messaging platform mean you can choose to allow anyone to direct message you, even when you aren't following each other. This feature is off by default, but you can turn it on within your Security and Privacy settings. This is a great way to allow customers to get in touch in a more private way. Secondly, Twitter now allows the creation of deep links within tweets. This allows you to embed calls to action such as "Send a private message." By offering this within a discourse, users can move seamlessly between regular tweets, mentions, and private messaging. Customer service is more ubiquitous. Lastly, crafting the perfect customer service response can be difficult to do in 140 characters. Many brands and businesses use tools that allow you to link to longer tweets. For customers, however, this disrupts the experience of staying within Twitter to deal with the issue. One way to get around the 140-character limit is to use a simple Twitter hack that allows you to link a series of replies. Once you write a tweet, click Reply to that tweet, remove your Twitter handle that appears automatically (you don't need it), and type out the second response. When users click on one of the tweets or choose View Conversation, they'll see the string of replies. Then the conversation is joined up and you haven't had to go into private messaging or another tool to get around the character limit. This is a great Twitter hack for customer service, where you often need more space to take care of your customer. What Is Your External Policy? As great as it is to get your team members all on the same page for customer service, it's important to inform your customers so they know what to expect. If your Twitter handle is answered around the clock, great! However, you can also set hours of business where your team can respond quickly to queries on Twitter, and then add this information to your Twitter bio or as a pinned tweet. That way, customers know where to turn at any hour of the day and are given an option for any high-priority communication. #2: Assign Role Responsibility Whose job is it to manage your customer service online? If the responsibility lies with just one person, it's fairly easy. However, if there are multiple customer service advocates for your brand, or the number changes on weekends and holidays, then you need a structure for areas of responsibility. You can use a calendar or Google sheet to assign responsibility and show who's in charge and when. You can enhance it by using color-coding or a tagging system. If you use a customer service tool, it's even easier.

Facebook Video for Marketers: Strategy for Future Success

Facebook Video for Marketers: Strategy for Future Success

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you create videos for your business? Wondering how to best leverage your videos on Facebook? To explore Facebook video strategy, I interview Jay Baer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Jay Baer, a digital marketing and social media strategist. He authored Hug Your Haters, a book about social care, and also hosts the Social Pros Podcast and the Jay Today show. Jay discusses the differences between video on Facebook and YouTube. You'll discover the tech and tools Jay uses to produce his own videos. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Video for Marketers Facebook Versus YouTube Jay says a lot of people do very well with YouTube videos, and just as many do well with Facebook videos. However, not too many people do equally well with both because each platform has a specific use case. People watch YouTube as a replacement for television entertainment or they're searching for how-to videos. On Facebook, videos appear in the news feed and can interrupt people while they're on the platform. At Convince & Convert, Jay says they advise clients to think about what the video is and under what circumstances people will want to watch it. Based on that assessment, choose one of the platforms as the primary home for the video. I mention how views of The Last Jedi trailer on Facebook far surpassed views on YouTube within the first 30 minutes of its release. Jay responds by noting a few factors that might have contributed to that difference at that particular point in time. One is that Facebook allows users to share content with others easily. Also, Facebook defines a "view" differently than YouTube. Although we both suspect most viewers of The Last Jedi are watching the whole trailer, marketers should remember that Facebook counts 3 seconds as a view, whereas YouTube requires 30 seconds. Also, a video on Facebook may receive substantially more views immediately after it's posted but the YouTube video may receive more views in the long run, especially on a strong YouTube channel. To clarify how The Last Jedi example pertains to the everyday marketer, Jay stresses that Facebook drives exposure based on engagement. So if you put a video on Facebook and a disproportionate number of people like, comment, and share, then a disproportionate number of people will see the video in their feed. This visibility gives even more Facebook users an opportunity to share the video with somebody else, and the cycle continues. Jay sees this ripple effect every time he posts a video on Facebook. If he gets immediate engagement, then more people see it. If he doesn't, users' engagement with the video will plateau. Next we talk about streaming live video to Facebook versus YouTube. For vlogging, Jay says that you could use both Facebook and YouTube. Jay does something like this with his Jay Today show. He streams the live video first on his personal Facebook profile and posts the video file elsewhere afterward. Jay explains that Facebook's API prevents you from live-streaming anywhere else while you're streaming to Facebook Live. To stream to Facebook Live, Periscope, and YouTube Live simultaneously, you would need multiple phones or computers. That limitation is one reason Jay goes to Facebook Live first; he can't be anywhere else. He also notes that on YouTube (for now at least), you need to have 1,000 or more subscribers to stream live video from a mobile device. So YouTube's live video feature isn't as widely accessible as Facebook's. Listen to the show to hear Jay discuss his approach t...

How to Republish, Repurpose and Reinvent Your Content Using LinkedIn Publisher

How to Republish, Repurpose and Reinvent Your Content Using LinkedIn Publisher

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Want to give existing content new life and greater visibility? Looking for a way to publish more often without much extra work? Use LinkedIn Publisher to consistently provide useful content for your audience, gain visibility and build your professional identity without writing anything new! In this article you’ll discover three ways to give existing content new life using LinkedIn Publisher. Listen to this article: #1: Republish Blog Posts One of the fastest ways to get started on LinkedIn is to copy and paste your complete content posts from other blogs. If you decide to go this route, there are a couple of things to keep in mind. It's important to understand how Google views duplicate content. You should wait at least two weeks after the post publishes before you republish it to LinkedIn. That gives the bots from search engines enough time to index and understand which post is the original, and rank it higher than republished content. Barry Feldman posted an article on LinkedIn a month after it originally appeared on his blog. To let readers know where to find the original post, include a sentence at the beginning or end that directs readers to the original version. This is especially important when you republish your guest post from another company's blog and it's a nice rule of thumb to adopt when you republish your own content. Readers will know where they can find more of your articles. Plus, they'll see you're honest about republishing your post. Take the time to craft a headline that's a little different and specific to the LinkedIn platform. For example, when Guillaume Decugis republishes content on LinkedIn, Medium and other syndication sites, he changes the title of each post to distinguish and optimize it. Then readers who search for the keyword will see multiple versions of the headline on the first page of search engine results. Remember, treat LinkedIn Publisher as a distribution channel, where the goal is to increase visibility and grow your audience. Send people back to your blog, so they can get to know more about you and your business. #2: Repurpose Long-Form Content Do you have robust ebooks, case studies and speeches that are too long for LinkedIn? No worries. It's easy to optimize your existing long-form blog content for LinkedIn Publisher. Take your long-form blog posts or ebooks and break them down into multiple individual posts. Include additional images and subheads too. You can even take old speeches and write them as LinkedIn posts. For example, Ann Handley (who does an excellent job of mixing new content and repurposed content into her LinkedIn Publisher posts) recently reimagined a speech published on her blog in 2013 for a LinkedIn Publisher post in 2015. #3: Use Previous Content to Inspire New Posts If you don't want to republish the same content (or even parts of it) from your blog, there are a few other options to avoid starting completely from scratch. Take a look at the analytics from your published content to see which articles performed best. Look at traffic, social media shares and any other metrics you monitor for performance. Then try to figure out what made that content so successful. One way to do this is to ask yourself questions about each post. Once you determine the source of that success, write a new article for LinkedIn that's similar. You can also go through your blog and find articles with similar themes. Then pick the big ideas from each post and turn it into a list post on LinkedIn. Include a summary paragraph or two from each post, as well as a link back to the original. Tips for LinkedIn Publisher Engagement and Visibility Whether you republish existing content verbatim or revise it, there are a few things to do to optimize it for LinkedIn. OkDork analyzed 3,000 of the most successful LinkedIn Publishing posts to come up with these helpful takeaways:

SEO Design Solutions Blog

SEO Design Solutions Blog


SEO Design Solutions™ Blog

Follow Jeffrey Smith and the SEO Design Solutions team as they discuss all things SEO and provide proven SEO tips and tactics.

LinkedIn Prospecting: How to Find Your Next Customer on LinkedIn

LinkedIn Prospecting: How to Find Your Next Customer on LinkedIn

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use LinkedIn for your business? Are you wondering how to use LinkedIn to find prospects and customers? To learn about how to build strategic relationships through LinkedIn, I interview Viveka von Rosen for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Viveka von Rosen, author of LinkedIn Marketing: An Hour a Day and founder of Linked Into Business. Viveka shares how she prospects on LinkedIn for her business. You'll learn about the tools available to make prospecting easy and what you need to do to get started. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: LinkedIn Prospecting What is prospecting? Viveka explains that a prospect is someone whom you either find or attract to you who's in a company, business, industry or organization that has a need for your product or service. Before social media, prospecting was done through very expensive outbound sales. However, social media and LinkedIn in particular have changed this. You'll hear why Viveka loves prospecting. Social media has changed us from the age of the seller to the age of the consumer. Consumers now tell us want they want. A large part of prospecting is to know who your ideal clients are and know their needs. Facebook, Yelp, LinkedIn and Twitter make the research a lot easier. As a seller, it's also a lot easier and cheaper to get out there and position yourself as a thought leader. This engenders the feeling of "know, like and trust" in a client or prospect with whom you may not have had direct interaction. It makes it easier to close the sale. In Jill Konrath's book, Selling to BIG Companies, she talks about how you have to know whom to sell to. This is why LinkedIn is so important—it tells you who works at the companies, their positions and whom they interact with. It enables you to reach out to the right person. Listen to the show to find out why groups can be so powerful. LinkedIn for prospecting Viveka explains the two aspects of prospecting—inbound and outbound. Actively prospecting is just a matter of research. With a combination of keywords, titles, company name and location, you can use the Advanced Search on LinkedIn to discover the people you want to interact with. These are your prospects. You'll hear about some of the great benefits of LinkedIn and also some of its limitations. One of the most powerful search categories is Location. Not only can you see who lives in your town, but also when you attend trade shows or conferences, it's a great way to connect with people before the event. A really cool app that you can use for conferences is Bizzabo, which has a LinkedIn API interface. There are thousands of events in there and you can see who will be at the event. It shows you their LinkedIn profile. In the show, you'll also discover another app which can be used for prospecting. If you want to meet prospects face to face before an event, a cool new app called Trendr will set up a live meeting place. Listen to the show to find out how you can discover if a prospect is active in a particular LinkedIn group. Viveka's experience on LinkedIn Viveka is extremely active on LinkedIn, either prospecting or inbound. She says that 70-80% of her business comes through LinkedIn and the remainder through things that she markets on Twitter. When you own a LinkedIn group, it allows you to position yourself as a thought leader. Viveka owns quite a few groups.

How to Assess and Improve Your Social Media Marketing: A Monthly Plan

How to Assess and Improve Your Social Media Marketing: A Monthly Plan

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Is social media working for you? Want better results? Regularly analyzing the performance of your social media marketing helps ensure your content and profiles are delivering. In this article you'll discover four monthly assessments to improve your social media marketing results. Listen to this article: #1: Review Key Performance Indicators Most marketers will tell you that if you didn't measure it, it didn't happen. Before you go running to your dashboard, though, it's important to know what you need to measure. Determine which key performance indicators (KPIs) actually matter to your business. B2Cs, for example, often care about engagement and brand awareness. This means metrics such as likes, shares, comments, followers and retweets. B2Bs, on the other hand, put more weight on the clicks, conversions and website traffic coming from social channels. Look at the numbers to see where your leads are coming from, when and how they convert and what types of content produce the greatest returns. From there, you can determine what to tweak for the best possible performance, and what to discard or modify. You can (and should) consider both quantitative and qualitative metrics. Quantitative factors are more concrete and easier to measure (optimal time of day and character count). Qualitative factors are more abstract (subject matter and tone of voice) and can be a bit trickier to measure accurately. Quantitative Metrics Once you've selected your KPIs, start with the quantitative analysis.  Pay attention to the best times to post your social content. Many social media tools automatically analyze this for you, but you can also check manually. For example, look at the top-performing posts based on clicks (assuming that posts with fewer than five clicks shouldn't be counted), and see if you can identify a pattern in terms of days and hours. Also look at your worst-performing posts and compare their times and days to the successful set. Find out if your audience prefers shorter, snackable messaging or longer, meatier posts. Look at the character count for Twitter or the word count for LinkedIn and Facebook to see which lengths were most successful for each network. Although 65% of B2B marketers realize that visual content works, look at whether visual posts are really driving engagement for your brand. Also, find out what kind of visuals worked best: images, videos, slides, infographics or GIFs. For Twitter, despite research showing that tweets with images generally outperform those without, that may or may not be true for your business. Depending on which social networks you're posting to, check the impact of hashtags and keywords you've used. If you see that a certain hashtag isn't getting you results, turn to Hashtagify.me or RiteTag to find new ideas, especially more long-tail versions that your target audience may be monitoring. Qualitative Metrics There are also some qualitative metrics you need to review monthly: Identify what topics have performed well. Is there an increasing number of shares, likes and inquisitive comments when you promote blog posts about certain topics, events or trends? The easiest way to assess this is to bucket all of your social posts into "campaigns" when writing them. Then you can see which campaign did the best, and use this knowledge to write similar content. Assess whether your top posts were written in an educational, humorous or straightforward tone. This one is a bit harder to analyze. Try to find out if people are reading your posts to educate themselves professionally or reading them just for fun. Keep in mind that while B2C marketing efforts focus on driving traffic and engagement (which are, no doubt, important to any marketing effort), B2B campaigns are focused on leads. Ultimately, you'll use your analytics to help find out how many of the people you're engaging through social channels will contribute to your botto...

How to Handle Customer Complaints Via Social Media

How to Handle Customer Complaints Via Social Media

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are your customers leaving negative comments on social media? Do you need a plan to handle customer complaints? Responding quickly and appropriately to negative social comments can help you increase customer loyalty and retention. In this article you’ll find out how to deal with negative comments on social media. Listen to this article: #1: Respond Quickly It's important to respond quickly and efficiently to customer complaints on social media. As a starting point, try to reply within 1 hour. This doesn't mean you need to have all the answers right away. Customers typically want you to acknowledge their issue so they know you're looking into it. Next, let customers know when they can expect a response. This helps you manage expectations and reduce negative feedback. You've acknowledged the issue and set a realistic time frame for a response. It's important to consistently provide this same level of response on social media, even on weekends. According to a study from Convince & Convert, 40% of respondents expect a response time within hours of leaving a complaint. #2: Acknowledge Mistakes Consumers know that no business is perfect, so instead of hiding mistakes, it's best to own up to them. When you apologize to fans on social media, you acknowledge mistakes and take ownership. This also prevents the customer from continuing to blame your company for the mistake or issue. Then you can focus on the real task at hand, which is to help find a solution. When you post an apology on social media, make sure it's genuine. People will be quick to highlight apologies that appear to have been copied and pasted from a script or that lack emotion. Instead, show your human side and use your natural tone of voice. Above, you can see how Fashion brand Allen Solly found a creative way to apologize and respond to this customer's comment. When you've made a mistake, it's best to show transparency, be honest and do everything in your power to fix the situation right away. For example, Pizza Hut took ownership of a mistake with an order by responding promptly and apologizing to the customer. Remember, it takes time to build trust with your customers, but it takes only seconds to lose it. #3: Take Conversations Offline All communications on social media are in the public eye, and often when dealing with negative comments, this can prompt others to join in. The best course of action is to take the conversation offline so you can talk to the person one on one. This prevents the situation from escalating, and also helps calm the customer, because you're working with him or her to resolve the problem. #4: Personalize Your Responses When customers reach out to you with a negative social comment, they're typically looking for you to acknowledge and help resolve their problem. If you respond with an automated reply, you're sending a message that you haven't taken time to understand the issue and don't value the customer's input. Here's an automated response that has no relevance to the customer's negative comment. When responding to negative comments, these tips will help you reassure customers: Reply using a conversational tone. Include the customer's name in the response. Let the customer know how you will fix the issue. If it's a mistake, take ownership. Acknowledge the customer's situation in your response. Automated replies can save you time when answering common queries online, but only use them as templates for your responses. The key is to personalize your messages, rather than copy and paste the same message every time. #5: Don't Take It Personally When dealing with negative comments on social media, remember that customers aren't angry with you as an individual. They're angry about the situation they're in. That's why you should never take these responses personally or respond to the customer in a negative manner as a result.

6 Copywriting Techniques for the Best SEO

by Gloria Kopp @ MOJO Marketplace Blog

Struggling with writing for SEO? Here are six SEO copywriting techniques to help you rank better and engage your readers at the same time.

The post 6 Copywriting Techniques for the Best SEO appeared first on MOJO Marketplace Blog.

Meta Description Generator

by Jonathan Hochman @ Hochman Consultants

Unique meta descriptions help ensure that the search results contain a relevant hook to encourage the searchers to click through. Search engines may also use the meta descriptions and titles of pages to perform a quick check to see if…

The post Meta Description Generator appeared first on Hochman Consultants.

How to Grow Your Instagram Exposure

How to Grow Your Instagram Exposure

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you using Instagram to promote your business? Want to increase your exposure? Making a few simple tweaks to your Instagram marketing can generate more engagement and increase the visibility of your content. In this article you'll discover how to get more exposure for your brand on Instagram. Listen to this article: #1: Embrace the Hashtag Descriptive hashtags on Instagram will help expose your content to more people. This will lead to more engagement and ultimately grow your followers. For anyone who doesn't already know, hashtags are short, descriptive keywords, preceded by the hash sign (#), which enable users to find content they're looking for with a simple click. Relevant hashtags in posts help create a dialogue between your business and other users. There are a number of things you can do with hashtags to get the ball rolling on Instagram. First of all, add hashtags relevant to your industry or niche to every post your business makes on Instagram. Remember, you can use as many hashtags as you want, which will help you attract a wider audience. Note: Research has found even small accounts that use 11 or more hashtags receive an average of 77.6 interactions. So if you're an online retailer specializing in women's clothes, include the hashtag #womensfashion, among others, in your photo description. This will help users find inspiration, as well as help you land more followers, improve brand awareness and increase sales. Plus, spend some time commenting on relevant photos from other Instagram users with a hashtag you're targeting. Your brand will be exposed to users who are already interested in that specific hashtag, which will also help increase followers and engagement. There are a few more things you can do to get the most out of hashtags. First, be as specific as possible when choosing your hashtags. This will help your brand connect with other like-minded users on Instagram. You'll have a much better chance of converting them, since they're highly targeted prospects. Also, be relevant. Make sure you use applicable hashtags on your posts, so people who are interested in what you do are able to find you. Finally, keep your eyes open. Pay attention to which hashtags other users are including on their photos. You may find a new, popular hashtag that will help you reach more people. #2: Engage With Your Community To make the most of your efforts on Instagram, it's vital to spend time engaging with your community and other users on the platform. See what photos and hashtags attract the most comments and likes, and jump on the bandwagon. You can also re-post exceptional images from your followers. Also, determine where people from your target demographic hang out. Find out which accounts they follow and then engage with them. Comment on their photos and like their posts. Remember to add value with your comments and don't be spammy. If you've done your research and interact with the right people, these users are likely to engage with your brand and follow your account. Your brand will also start to show up on their followers' radar. #3: Launch a Contest The prospect of getting something for nothing has always been alluring in the world of marketing. Use the reach and popularity of your Instagram account to host competitions and attract more followers. An Instagram contest is a great way to drum up excitement and get people talking about your brand. Whether you go with a tag, hashtag, like to win, share or other type of promotion, your Instagram contest will certainly be a hit. #4: Build Awareness of Your Instagram Handle Even though this is fairly obvious and straightforward, it's still worth mentioning. The first step in Instagram marketing is to promote your handle to your customers. Then they'll know you have a presence on Instagram and where to find you. There are various ways to spread the word that your business is on Instagram.

External Links & SEO

by Jonathan Hochman @ Hochman Consultants

You’ve worked hard to get visitors to your web site. Should you provide external links? What if visitors leave via those links and never come back? Visitors leave when they’ve seen enough. Trying to box them in won’t stop them…

The post External Links & SEO appeared first on Hochman Consultants.

Online Reviews: How to Respond to Fraudulent Reviews

Online Reviews: How to Respond to Fraudulent Reviews

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do people review your business online? Ever receive negative or fraudulent reviews? To discover what to do when you receive a review that's not what you were expecting, I interview Dan Lemin. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Daniel Lemin, the founder of One Good Brand. He is also a strategist for Convince & Convert, and author of the brand-new book, Manipurated. Dan will explore online reviews and how to deal with bad and fraudulent reviews. You'll discover why online reviews are so important. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Online Reviews Dan's backstory Dan started his online career with Google's corporate marketing team and saw the emergence of black hat SEO (search engine optimization). He explains the distinction between white hat (good) and black hat (bad) SEO, and talks about link farms as an example of black hat tactics. Google came to love Yelp's fresh content and Dan says that's how the rating and review platforms attracted shadowy SEO characters. They saw the opportunity to continue "tricking" consumers through new platforms. Listen to the show to discover why the owners of small- and medium-sized businesses need to know the dynamics of the SEO industry. Why reviews are important Dan shares that nearly 90% of consumers say they trust reviews as much as they trust their friends and family. Since so many people make decisions based on online reviews, the vast majority of a business's prospective customers are filtering through review sites. Since Google favors this type of content, reviews are a new SEO tactic, and that's why site owners are adding some type of rating and review component. For instance, a lot of hospitality businesses like Starwood Hotels have added reviews to their websites. He says one review will not necessarily make or break a business, but cautions that the presence of the review industry can make or break small businesses, because they don't have all the tools and techniques a large company like Chipotle might have. When asked which review sites matter most, Dan explains his research found it really depends on the business category. For example, Gondola Adventures in Newport Beach, which is in a super-specialized industry, says Yelp matters, but TripAdvisor is even more important. Dan says companies can track reviews manually by going to each review site, but it's very time-consuming. To help, there's a whole cottage industry of companies such as ReviewTrackers and ReviewPush that do review tracking for businesses. Listen to the show to learn how much traffic Yelp gets from Google. The purpose of fake reviews Dan shares that there are different layers to the purpose of fake reviews. He first discusses fake positive reviews and says that several weeks ago, Amazon filed an unprecedented lawsuit against 1,100 people. They accused anonymous people on Fiverr of selling reviews for profit on Amazon. For his book, Dan interviewed a young lady who writes reviews for a living, and says it's very difficult to distinguish her reviews from legitimate ones. Dan discusses fake reviews that are created to injure the reputation of a business. Dan also shares an example of another type of fake review, a scam that targeted wedding photographers in the Bay Area. After responding to what looked like a legitimate inquiry from their websites, the photographers would get an email saying "I decided not to hire you" or "we changed the date." The email would go on to say, "I work in the online reputation business,

The Local Search Serenity Prayer

by Meghan Trapp @ B² Interactive

It’s important to be on top of your local search strategy. But where to start? Our local search serenity prayer can help you focus your local SEO strategy for better ranking and optimization in 2017.

The post The Local Search Serenity Prayer appeared first on B² Interactive.

How to Boost Your Influence Using Your LinkedIn Profile

How to Boost Your Influence Using Your LinkedIn Profile

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Is your LinkedIn profile working for you? Want to build a presence that supports your company role? While many people think of LinkedIn as a place only for jobseekers, salespeople and recruiters, LinkedIn can help employees build influence around any business role. In this article you'll discover three ways to build a LinkedIn presence to boost visibility for both you and your business. #1: Align Your Personal Message With Your Company's Your LinkedIn presence is unique on social media, because while it is your personal profile, the fact that it highlights your professional activities means that it is enmeshed with your employer's online presence. Listen to this article: Many companies fall flat with their social media approach to employees because it's top down (for example, "put this corporate marketing copy in your profile" or "share this status update"). And understandably, people resist. But incorporating your employer's brand message can help you, because part of your value as a professional is the team around you. Plugging into that larger message expands your capability and credibility. Incorporate Company Marketing Copy in Your Profile If you copy and paste wholesale from your employer's website, your profile will look sterile and untrustworthy. But if you pull in key phrases and ideas, you reinforce your message. Companies spend a lot of money figuring out the best way to communicate their message, and you can piggyback onto that. The Summary paragraph above is from a Dell executive's LinkedIn profile. It's a great example of how to mix a personal viewpoint with the overall company focus. Support Your External-Facing Team You may not deal with clients and prospects on a daily basis, but someone in your company does. In the online landscape, your profile is just a click away. Take look at your colleagues' profiles and see what they're talking about to make sure you align with that message. One of the easiest ways to show your teammates some love is with the social tools on LinkedIn. If you want to make coworkers look better to their audiences (and by extension, yours), click the Like and Share buttons on their posts. This will also extend the reach of your colleagues' messages. #2: Clearly Define Your Role Don't assume the people you work with already know what you do, because they likely don't. The bigger your company gets, the harder it is for coworkers to know the experience and skills you bring to the table. Whether it's through your profile or a status update, share your unique perspective so that others know how you can help them. There might not be a direct line between your social media activity and your audience (unless you're a salesperson or recruiter), but your core message needs to be clear. As a professional, you have a unique value that you bring to your work. Think of the people you serve, and share information that is relevant to them. Connect With Your Target Audience Your audience might be internal employees you support, or clients and partners who rely on your work. Be very clear about whom you need to "talk to" online. Use your headline to share information that answers questions people might have about you and how you can help them. Here's an example of effective LinkedIn profile headline from an employee of the company above. Be sure to include keywords throughout your profile that resonate with your audience. Think of it as SEO for humans. For example, if you're the compliance officer for a financial services firm, and help your employees stay on the right side of the law, include that in places like your profile headline and experience. Publish Your Ideas The ability to share long-form content through LinkedIn Publisher is a fantastic opportunity for internal employees to build a following. More importantly, when you post content on LinkedIn, it doesn't pull focus away from your day job (which could happen ...

Facebook Ads and Beyond: What Marketers Need to Know

Facebook Ads and Beyond: What Marketers Need to Know

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use Facebook ads? Are you wondering how paid Facebook marketing can work for your business? To learn about Facebook EdgeRank and paid Facebook marketing, I interview Jon Loomer for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Jon Loomer, who blogs about advanced Facebook marketing at Jon Loomer.com. Jon used to do social media work for the the NBA and American Cancer Society before going out on his own in 2011. Jon shares what efficient targeting means for marketers and the metrics involved. You'll learn creative ways to generate more business on a minimal budget. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Advertising EdgeRank and why it's important Jon explains how EdgeRank is the unofficial term for Facebook's sorting algorithm. You don't see everything that's published in your news feed. It depends on your affinity, your connection with specific people and pages, how you interacted with a specific content type in the past and the 'weight' given to posts. The EdgeRank algorithm as described by WhatIsEdgeRank.com. Over time, the older something is, the less likely that you'll see it in the news feed. And in a perfect world, EdgeRank helps you see what you want to see. You'll discover as a marketer what you need to do to make sure your fans see your content and how EdgeRank can help you rise to the top. Listen to the show to find out what you need to do to encourage your fans to act on your Facebook updates. Facebook metrics marketers should pay attention to As a marketer, it depends what your goals are on Facebook. Jon explains that he is a publisher, and when people visit his website, he makes money. So for him, the more traffic the better. You'll find out why Jon focuses on consumption and a stat called link clicks. Jon explains that consumption is any type of click, whether it resulted in a story or not. It could be a comment, like or share, but it could also be a photo click, video play, link click or any other click. Remember Facebook records them all. You'll hear an example of the post-level export lists for all reposts over a given time period. You can look at it post by post, posts that had the most consumption and quantity of clicks. With a time decay on Facebook updates, Jon shares what you need to do to make sure you reach people in completely different time zones with your most popular links to help you reach a new audience. Listen to the show to find out the best time to reshare a post, with time decay in mind. Facebook targeting for marketers Over the last few months Facebook has made it easy for you to target your updates to different audiences. Jon explains there are two different forms of targeting. You can target your posts or you can target your ads. You'll hear why Jon is not a big fan of post targeting. Where Facebook targeting really comes alive is within advertising. Facebook constantly releases something new to make it incredibly powerful. On the Facebook advertising side, Jon reveals some of the newer things that Facebook has done with targeting. Last year when the Custom Audiences feature was first rolled out, it allowed you to target your offline customer list with email addresses you'd collected, phone numbers or Facebook UIDs. These are people who have proven to subscribe to your content or bought something from you in the past. Whether or not they are your fans,

Tools to Optimize Your Social Scheduling When You Need a Break

Tools to Optimize Your Social Scheduling When You Need a Break

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Ever want to take a day off from posting on social media? Have you considered scheduling posts for weekends and holidays, or when you just can’t respond? Posting to Facebook and Twitter when many businesses are silent helps you stay top of mind with your followers. In this article you'll discover how to keep your social media accounts stocked with content when you’re on break. Why Post on Weekends? Some non-workdays are perfect times to be active on social media for certain types of businesses (think special offers for ecommerce sites during the holidays, for example). Simply greeting your followers on a holiday is a great way to build genuine likes and interactions. Listen to this article: Contrary to popular belief, social media posting on weekends is essential for your brand presence growth. The following studies show Saturday and Sunday posts can increase your interactions: Weekend posts on Facebook get more engagement than workweek posts. Weekend and Wednesday tweets are believed to be the best days for B2C companies. Weekend and afternoon tweets show the highest click-through rates. While posting on weekends and holidays can make sense for your business, the desire to take a well-deserved day off is understandable. Read on for some tips to keep your accounts active on those days. #1: Schedule Content Effectively If you'll be taking a weekend or holiday vacation, scheduling some updates for that time is a smart strategy. I recommend that you schedule updates with a tool like MavSocial because it's free and supports top social media networks. You can use the Post Manager feature to schedule your social media updates and check the Campaign Planner calendar to make sure you post each day of your vacation. Don't overschedule for holidays (especially if you are into ecommerce). Holidays can be risky: Customers wait longer for orders, and customer service is swamped. Downtime also tends to happen on holidays because hosting companies are understaffed. So it's not the best time for multiple social media updates. One timely update congratulating customers on the holidays is enough. Don't overschedule for time slots you won't be available to interact; one or two updates per day will be enough to maintain a consistent presence. I suggest a daily schedule like the one below for weekends or holiday absences: Schedule one Facebook page post: The purpose of this update is mostly to generate organic interactions rather than to convert, so post something entertaining and timely like a meme on a trending topic. You can also consider a post that acknowledges the holiday, a funny weekend picture or video, a joke or a visual quote. Schedule two to three tweets: Avoid asking questions, posting mini-contests or publishing tweets that may prompt questions or interactions you'll need to quickly react to. Instead, use this time to re-share important updates from the weekdays such as a special offer or an upcoming event reminder. #2: Tools to Improve Your Weekend Posting Although consistency is important to your success in social media marketing, so is including variety in what you share. Select an image from the MavSocial gallery to diversify your weekend and holiday social media updates on Twitter and Facebook. Unlike many other scheduling tools out there, the MavSocial Post Manager feature actually uploads your visual content to each network. To scale your entertaining content on Twitter for holidays, weekends or vacation time, use Tweet Jukebox to auto-post from a cool pre-built box you fill. I have a box of interesting quotes I use only for weekends. Simply register a free account and enable the box from My Jukeboxes. Sometimes updating your social media accounts in real time is unavoidable, which is why I like the idea of DrumUp so much. DrumUp has a great free mobile app for Android that you can use to make this process easier from your smartphone.

Marketing Partnerships: How to Extend Your Reach With Content Collaboration

Marketing Partnerships: How to Extend Your Reach With Content Collaboration

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you create great content other businesses might find interesting? Have you considered collaborating with other brands? To learn how to create marketing partnerships with content, I interview Andrew Davis. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Andrew Davis, author of Brandscaping: Unleashing the Power of Partnerships. He's also a popular speaker. Andrew explores the why and how of marketing partnerships with content. You'll discover the importance of creating marketing partnerships, as well as how to find the best partners and the keys to a successful collaboration. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Marketing Partnerships What led Andrew to write a book on marketing partnerships Andrew studied TV and film at Boston University, and got a job right out of school producing two public affairs programs. From there he freelanced as a producer for programs, such as the Today Show and Weekend Today. After the first dot-com boom, Andrew followed the path of some of his friends into the marketing world. While working at startups, Andrew realized that if you created great content, like television producers did, you actually would inspire people to buy stuff. He figured if he could apply those principles in the marketing world, he could really be successful. He then partnered with James Cosco, a journalist, who also went to BU. They started an agency called Tippingpoint Labs, and grew it until 2012, when Andrew sold his share in the business and wrote Brandscaping. Andrew has since been traveling the world, speaking and helping people find the right kinds of partnerships and rethink marketing. Listen to the show to hear about Andrew's background as a producer, and how the skills he developed prepared him for work in marketing. The meaning of brandscaping Andrew says that brandscaping is leveraging the audiences of others for the benefit of both partners. In the digital age everybody has an audience, whether it's on social media or through email. If you partner with other brands and create valuable content that they would want to proactively send to their audience, then there is no need to buy access to the media. Listen to the show to find out how our podcast is a brandscape.  The benefits of partnering Andrew explains that there are three simple benefits to partnering: it's better, faster and cheaper. It's better. As marketers, we can create better content if we're willing to partner with others who know the audience perhaps even better than we do. It's faster. Most content marketing is a slow-grow strategy. But brands that partner with other brands see much more rapid success with the content they create. It's cheaper. It's much less expensive to share with other audiences than it is to advertise. If you're nervous about partnering with a brand, Andrew suggests you find a person who is a known talent and who already has access to your audience. Listen to the show to discover how to partner with talent. Examples of content collaborations Andrew shares examples of some great marketing partnerships. When Converse (the athletic shoe company) was trying to rebuild their brand, their CMO Geoff Cottrill realized they got the most traction when celebrities wore their shoes and they ended up in a magazine. Since it was too expensive to buy access to celebs, Geoff figured they should look for the next big thing. So he partnered with Guitar Center, because they have access to wanna-be musicians. They built a studio in Brooklyn,

How to Use LinkedIn Publisher Statistics to Refine Your Marketing

How to Use LinkedIn Publisher Statistics to Refine Your Marketing

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you use LinkedIn Publisher? Want to get deeper engagement from your posts? LinkedIn Publisher now offers the ability to review stats for your published posts, which helps you refine messaging, target the right audience and directly engage with the people who interact with you. In this article I'll share how to access LinkedIn Publisher statistics and how to use them strategically. Listen to this article: How to Access LinkedIn Publisher Stats LinkedIn Publisher is a powerful platform because it's sticky. Your posts live on forever on your profile, and the content is searchable. It's good for positioning yourself as an expert in your industry and sharing relevant information with your followers. Your LinkedIn Publisher analytics show you how your content is doing, make sure it's reaching the right people and help you connect with those who are responding to your posts. It's great for content development and lead generation. You can access your LinkedIn statistics in a couple of places: on your profile just above your posts and on your author page (the URL that's associated with the page where your posts are listed). Click on See More, and then select a post to see its statistics. The three sections of analytics are See How Your Post Is Doing, Demographics of Your Readers and Who Is Responding to Your Posts. Here's a look at how to use each section to create more powerful content and increase visibility. #1: Track Publication Trends Go to the See How Your Post Is Doing section to discover if your posts are getting views. You can see your posts' visibility for the last 7 days, 15 days, 30 days, 6 months and 1 year. This analytics section also lets you view how many likes, shares and comments a particular post has received, as shown in the upper-right corner of the image below. After you publish a post, keep a close eye on the activity for the first week. Often visibility increases on the second, third and fourth day. Therefore, if you're writing a post that has a specific timeline (perhaps it relates to a project, product or webinar release), make sure you post it a day or two before you need people to see it. Also, try posting on different days of the week and see if your results change. John White, a successful LinkedIn published writer, recommends posting at about 8 p.m. Eastern Time. Not only is this a good time to get views in Europe, but it's also not too late for U.S. time zones to see your content. It's interesting to look at the long-term view also to see if there's some correlation between trending events and the visibility of your post. For example, if your post on the latest Apple products gets a lot of traffic, you may want to write posts whenever Apple releases new products. Build on any increased reach by resharing a popular post as an update on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. If you like to keep a close eye on your metrics, see if there's a correlation between reshares and LinkedIn views. #2: Discover Reader Demographics Scroll down the page to see the demographics of your readers. LinkedIn shows you reader demographics related to the top four industries, titles, locations and traffic sources. Use the first three demographics (industries, titles and locations) to make sure you're attracting the right audience with your content. For example, if your niche demographic is marketing and advertising executives, but your content is attracting job-seekers in software design, you're probably using the wrong keywords and content. Also check to see what other people in your field are writing about to attract the correct audience. Then reframe your content so it targets the right demographics. You can always use LinkedIn Pulse to research what other people in your industry are writing about. As far as traffic sources are concerned, it might surprise you to find out how people get to your posts.

10 Medium Accounts Every Marketer Should be Following

by Shama @ Marketing Zen

Whether or not your own brand posts on Medium, there’s a lot that this unique social media platform can offer marketers. If you’re not familiar with Medium, it’s a platform for individuals and businesses to post long-form content. That could be anything from a short story, to an opinion piece, to a deeply technical blog post complete with graphs and charts. For whatever reason, Medium isn’t always the first place we marketers think of to look when we’re searching for the latest and greatest writing about our field. However, the platform is home to some excellent users, as well as publications, that every marketer should be following. All Things Marketing and Entrepreneurship The name says is all – this publication is all about marketing and entrepreneurship, although a quick skim over the most recent posts shows that it definitely leans more toward the marketing side of things. Larry Kim, the founder of WordPress, is a prominent voice here, writing about content marketing, mobile digital marketing, and offering advice on building and running startups. A bonus: You’ll also find plenty of unicorn memes. Another solid contributor is Joei Chan, whose pieces on SEO and email marketing are great reads. Rand Fishkin...

read more

The post 10 Medium Accounts Every Marketer Should be Following appeared first on Marketing Zen.

Nurturing Leads With Social: How to Warm Up Your Following

Nurturing Leads With Social: How to Warm Up Your Following

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you engage with your customers and prospects on social media? Want tactics to warm up your leads? To discover how to move people from fans to customers, I interview Kim Walsh-Phillips. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Kim Walsh-Phillips, CEO of Elite Digital Group, a direct response social agency. She's also a columnist for Entrepreneur Magazine. Her brand-new book, co-authored with Dan Kennedy, is the No B.S. Guide to Direct Response Social Media Marketing. Kim will explore how to use social media to turn cold prospects into warmer opportunities that lead to sales. You'll discover which types of content will engage your audience. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Nurturing Leads With Social Kim's backstory Kim says she has been doing public relations since before MySpace. Although she would get clients into the newspaper and throw great events, she was unable to show a return on investment. So when it came time for clients to renew, they would cancel. Kim spent much of her time going to networking events, meeting people, and trying to sign new clients. She knew she had to do something differently. In 2010, a friend gave her Dan Kennedy's original book, the No B.S. Guide to Direct Marketing. Because social is a channel just like direct mail, television, and radio, applying Dan's principles to social media worked. She could show clients how much money came from every dollar they spent, and was able to keep their accounts,which is something she was unable to do before. Listen to the show to learn what Kim had to do one time to make payroll. Direct response social media Kim explains that people use social media to have conversations, not to read a brochure. Direct response is a marketing tactic used to get a click-through, an opt-in, or drive a purchase. She shares that before social media, direct response tactics were used in direct mail, infomercials, print advertising, and even email. Kim says that when you tie social media and direct response together, you have conversations with people to create a direct result that is measured. Listen to the show to discover why Kim believes email and social media marketing don't carry a lot of direct response messaging. How marketers can tap into social Facebook is a cocktail party, Kim explains, whereas Google is a shopping mall (people are there searching for products, programs, and services). If you're going to interrupt their cocktail party with an "excuse me," you have to offer enough value that someone is willing to turn away from their best friend to pay attention to you. To engage fans in this non-disruptive way, Kim suggests you make a list of the 10 questions prospects ask you most often. For example, if you're an orthodontist, you would use the questions parents ask when they're considering braces for their child. If you're just getting started in business, she suggests using Quora to find questions people ask about your industry. Kim also shares that you can give services such as Textbroker.com a list of questions and their experts will answer them for you, creating copyright-free content really inexpensively. Simply answering those questions makes for great blog content and social media posts. Each day in your social media content, post a link to one of those great blog posts. Alternatively, use it for the post itself. For example: "A lot of people are curious as to how much braces cost. Costs generally range between X and Y." Those types of posts, Kim adds,

Topical Relevance, SEO and Keyword Stemming!

by Jeffrey_Smith @ SEO Design Solutions™ Blog

For the purpose of SEO, context is a definitive factor that can (1) elevate your website past others competing for similar or related keywords (2) build topical domain authority and (3) increase conversion by having a higher number of pages occupying a larger percentage of market share for related keywords and queries. Create Topical Relevance Read More

Facebook Professional Services: How Your Local Business Can Rank

Facebook Professional Services: How Your Local Business Can Rank

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you have a local business page on Facebook? Want to reach more local customers? Facebook recently launched Professional Services, a directory that helps consumers find the best local businesses and services to fit their needs. In this article I'll share how to use the Facebook Professional Services feature to boost visibility with local customers. Listen to this article: What Is Facebook Professional Services? Facebook Professional Services is a directory inside Facebook for local businesses. The goal is to help customers find local businesses with the best Facebook reviews and ratings. Facebook expert Mari Smith doesn't see it as making "... a huge dent in Yelp... at first." But, she continues, "Over time, as more and more businesses become savvy with their Facebook marketing, and really promote their page activity, the Services Directory and Places could be more of a first choice for consumers." Customers can use the search box to find businesses in the area based on keywords specific to the products or services they need. They can also browse the top local business categories. Within search results or specific category selections, customers see basic details about local businesses, such as their description, address, phone number and ratings. One of the nice parts about Facebook Professional Services is that it's not limited to the United States. People can search for local businesses worldwide. While there are no specific guidelines as to how the Facebook algorithm determines which local businesses to show, after several searches, you can determine it's based on the following: Where the local business is located Matching keywords in the local business page's name, description and category The overall average star rating of the local business The number of ratings the local business has received The recency of the latest review The number of check-ins for the local business Previous interactions between the local business page and the customer Connections between customers and people who check in, rate and review the local business Mobile users can access Facebook Professional Services from their device's browser. The search works the same, but the categories presented are much more limited. Inside the Facebook app, Nearby Places is the best alternative. iPhone users will find this under the More menu. There, they can search for businesses based on location and category. Search results and category pages will show similar information as presented in Facebook Professional Services on the desktop. Based on Facebook's tendency to create individual apps for different features, one could assume that if Facebook Professional Services takes off, it will become a stand-alone app similar to what Yelp offers. But Facebook Professional Services is still in its earliest stages, so only time will tell. Now that you know what Facebook Professional Services is and a little bit about how it works, here are some tips to help you boost your local business's visibility in the new local directory. #1: Choose the Correct Category and Subcategories for Your Local Business Page To ensure that customers find your local business in search or a category listing page, be sure that you've selected the appropriate category and subcategories for your local business. To start, search for the keywords or categories that customers would use to find you and see what Facebook suggests. Then go to your local business Facebook page and enter them in Page Info on the About tab. #2: Enter Your Business Details All of these fields (found in Page Info on the About tab of your local business Facebook page) appear in search results on Facebook Professional Services. Hence, you'll want to be sure the short description, contact info and business hours fields are filled in on your local business Facebook page.

SearchCap: AdWords AMP landing pages, Google & Apple tracking & SEO mistakes

by Barry Schwartz @ SearchCap: Daily Search Engine News Recap

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: AdWords AMP landing pages, Google & Apple tracking & SEO mistakes appeared first on Search Engine Land.

5 Ways to Get More LinkedIn Leads

5 Ways to Get More LinkedIn Leads

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you struggling to build a pipeline of quality leads? Wondering how LinkedIn can help? With the right forms of targeting, pitching, and engagement, you can use your LinkedIn profile to secure warm leads for your business. In this article, you'll discover how to create an effective lead generation process with your LinkedIn profile. Listen to this article: #1: Use LinkedIn Search to Identify Prospects While getting more likes and followers for your company page is important, it doesn't necessarily generate leads. For lead generation, you need to connect with the right audience. Start by narrowing down the job roles you want to target; focus on the people who are most likely to understand the technical benefits of your product and have the authority to make a buying decision. You should consider talking to CMOs, CEOs, CTOs, COOs, or other heads of departments your product or service fits into. For example, if your product is a social listening tool that helps companies with brand mentions, crisis prevention, and other monitoring opportunities on the web, you would search for and connect with heads of marketing or digital marketing. After you connect with relevant people, pitch them with a soft sell. Introduce yourself and your company in a soft tone. Instead of trying to tell your new connection how amazing your company is with 500 words, ask to schedule a 10-minute call. It's also important to follow up on your pitch if you don't hear back. Follow up after a week and again after two weeks. Use Google Sheets and a good CRM to maintain the flow of leads and track each lead's stage in terms of conversion. #2: Connect With Website Visitors on LinkedIn When you add the following code to your website, you can see everyone who visits your website in the Who's Viewed Your Profile section on LinkedIn: These people are validated warm leads because they've shown some level of interest in your company. As you find people who fit your ideal lead, you can follow up with them via a LinkedIn InMail or an email from your personal business account. For example, your message could read something like this: Hi NAME, Hope you are doing well. My name is NAME and I am the DESIGNATION at COMPANY NAME. I just took a deeper look at your website and understand that your company might be looking for PRODUCT FEATURES OR SERVICE. At YOUR COMPANY NAME, we are SHORT DESCRIPTION OF YOUR PRODUCT FEATURES OR SERVICE. FEATURE 1/SERVICE OF YOUR COMPANY FEATURE 2/SERVICE OF YOUR COMPANY The companies that have been working with us for a long time include CLIENT 1 and CLIENT 2. I was wondering if we could schedule a call sometime this week to discuss this further? Regards, YOUR NAME DESIGNATION PHONE COMPANY NAME #3: Make Your LinkedIn Profile a Resource If you follow the lead generation process thoroughly, you'll form a significant number of connections over a short period of time. You'll need to engage your growing audience by sharing educational material that can help them. For example, if your product is solving problems in the hospitality industry and your leads are upper management of hotels, it's best to share content from your profile that talks about that topic. You should also consider publishing similar content on Pulse. The point here is to share valuable content that will help you build credibility with your target leads. To streamline this process, you can use tools like Hootsuite or Buffer to schedule content from your LinkedIn profile. #4: Share Advice in LinkedIn Groups One of the best ways to gain credibility, and by extension the notice of prospects, is to share your knowledge and insight with the very people you want to work with. LinkedIn groups offer a way for you to find these people and warm them up. If, for example, your company sells products or services related to the human resources industry,

Content for Leads: How to Create Content That Spreads and Fills the Funnel

Content for Leads: How to Create Content That Spreads and Fills the Funnel

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you create content? Are you looking to generate more leads? To learn how to get the most from your content, I interview Jason Miller. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Jason Miller, the senior manager of content and social at LinkedIn Marketing Solutions. He's the author of Welcome to the Funnel: Proven Tactics to Turn Your Social and Content Marketing Up to 11. Jason is also an excellent photographer specializing in rock bands. Jason focuses on creating sharable content that also generates leads. You'll discover how content ties into influencer relationships and how to leverage it. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. How to subscribe/review on iPhone. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Content for Leads How Jason got started in content and social Jason worked in the music industry before he decided to reinvent himself in the social space. He tried to bring social to his music label, but they weren't interested. So Jason quit, went back to school for training in SEO and digital marketing. He worked at a little startup called Market Tools, then Marketo and he's now at LinkedIn. Jason talks about his time at Marketo. He led global and content marketing and did the blog and the social channels himself when he first started. It was chaos, he recalls. Jason learned very quickly how to solve other marketers' problems and write about them, which is how he grew his blogging skills. "It was B2B marketing, which could be quite boring," Jason recalls. "I took what I call the George Costanza approach, where I do the exact opposite of what everybody else is doing." For example, if someone said to Jason that social media doesn't work in B2B, he would do the exact opposite and prove them wrong. After a tremendous amount of trial and error to find out what worked and scaling his content efforts, Jason was successful. Listen to the show to hear the backstory for Welcome to the Funnel. Build relationships that tie into content Jason believes it's essential to include influencers in your marketing strategy, especially in your content. When you first start building your presence, seek out thought leaders in the space. Figure out how to take their wisdom and feature it in your content. You'll add third-party validation and keep from talking too much about yourself. At the same time, you also get on their radar. They know you're helping them spread the word and eventually you can find mutual benefit. Listen to the show to learn how going to conferences helped Jason get into guest blogging.  How to create sharable content that generates leads Jason believes we don't need more content, we need more relevant content. He has a concept he started at Marketo and brought over to LinkedIn called, "The Big Rock." Basically you need to ask yourself what conversation you want to own, and then write the book on it. Jason suggests going from thinking like a publisher to actually publishing like a publisher. When Jason first got to LinkedIn, the question was, "How do I market on LinkedIn successfully?" Since the conversation was being owned by others, Jason decided to take it back. He wrote a 65-page book called The Sophisticated Marketer's Guide to LinkedIn. It was everything you wanted to know about marketing on LinkedIn, written very strategically. It was broad-reaching content gated for the purpose of collecting email addresses. It was great for lead generation, bringing people into the funnel, helping out fellow marketers and getting the word out. According to Jason,

Search and Social: What Marketers Need to Know About the Changing Landscape

Search and Social: What Marketers Need to Know About the Changing Landscape

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use social media and search to promote your business? Are you wondering how the landscape of search and social is changing, and how to benefit from it? To learn about the key changes in search and social, and how they impact your marketing, I interview Lee Odden for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Lee Odden, author of the book Optimize: How to Attract and Engage More Customers by Integrating SEO, Social Media and Content Marketing. He's the CEO of TopRank Online Marketing and the editor of Marketing Blog. Plus there is a killer SlideShare tip you'll want to pay attention to. Lee shares his insights into the world of SEO and content marketing, and the elements of his strategy that have contributed to his success. You'll learn about the four categories of content that you must create for your sites, and tips for getting the most out of them. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Search and Social Graph Search and what Facebook is doing Lee believes that Facebook is always going to progress towards having a more robust search engine. Right now they are collecting a lot of data, and as Graph Search continues to roll out to more people, they will refine and optimize how it works. It's not just about providing a better user experience, there is ad play too. Lee feels that this is the driver. Lee believes that Facebook will move towards providing marketers opportunities to get in front of people and offer contextual advertising in the way that Google does. Before implementation of Graph Search, when you did a search on Facebook, the results would come from Facebook's own data set such as Fan Pages, Profiles, Groups, etc. If Facebook couldn't find what you were looking for, they would provide search results from Bing. Facebook is still working with Bing, but the search result set they offer is a lot different. The filtering options are more robust. However, today when we want to find something specific, we still use Google. As a marketer, Lee feels that it's important to understand the customer's journey and experiences. Often an idea surfaces on Facebook, and to validate the idea, people go over to Google expecting to find something that they can act on. Listen to the show to find out how the Facebook search capability is similar to what they have allowed to advertisers. How Google is using Google+ to impact the results consumers see Marketers need to consider the public social content crawled by Google Bot, the integration of Google+ and authorship, and the association between Google+ profiles and associated content in search results. Lee believes that it's virtually impossible to employ a successful organic search optimization effort without robust social content or social presence. These social signals have eclipsed signals like links. When you look at simplifying SEO best practices, we are not just talking about content, keywords and links. We have to equally include the importance of social content and social signals. Marketers really need to understand the search results landscape for their key search terms, and to what degree social content competes with you. Lee gives an example of how social is impacting search results. Every search experience result could be unique because of geography, and whether you are logged in or not. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Z9TTBxarbs As marketers, we still have to execute standard SEO best practices.

How to Boost Your Engagement With Visual Content

How to Boost Your Engagement With Visual Content

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want more engagement on your social channels? Have you considered using visual content? There are easy-to-use tools and tactics you can use to create visual content that attracts viewers and engages them. In this article you’ll discover how to use visual content to boost engagement. Listen to this article: #1: Create Animated GIFs From YouTube Video Millennials (people reaching young adulthood around the year 2000) are known as Generation GIF. If you check out publications like BuzzFeed, Gawker and Deadspin or browse the front pages of Reddit and Tumblr, you'll see animated GIFs are everywhere. Animated GIFs expand your marketing channels and increase the chances of your content going viral on Tumblr and Reddit. And from there, content is often picked up by major publications and blogs. There are tools that make it easy to create animated GIFs. Here are a couple you might want to try: MakeaGif is a free online tool that lets you create animated GIFs using photos, YouTube videos, uploaded videos and web camera videos. You can also use it to modify an existing GIF. GIFYT allows you to create high-quality GIFs from YouTube videos. With this free tool, you can select what portion of the video to turn into the GIF and add a caption. You can check out some of the GIFs created with GIFYT here. #2: Install On-Hover Sharing Buttons Sometimes readers are inclined to share an image, but they either don't know how or simply forget to do so. A mild mouseover call to action that encourages a share will prompt more visual shares from viewers. Use a plugin like WWM Social Share On Image Hover as an easy way to enable mouseover sharing (Here's how to securely install Wordpress plugins!) With this tool, you can automatically place buttons on all of your images so your viewers can share them in an instant. It's a surprisingly effective way to increase engagement. Here’s a page where you can see mouseover share buttons in action, and here are more plugins that add image-sharing options on mouseover. #3: Play on Emotion Connecting with your audience on an emotional level leaves a long-lasting impact. When something sparks an emotional response, the viewer is more likely to share, comment on and remember it. Visuals are great for this purpose. Humans respond to what they see, more so than any other form of stimulation. If you're connecting emotionally with users, they'll start to associate those feelings with your brand. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2K5trQS3JeA According to Fractl research, the two most engaging emotions (in terms of provoking shares) are positive feelings (such as joy, interest, anticipation and trust) and the element of surprise. #4: Celebrate Unusual Holidays From National Hamburger Day to National Book Lovers' Day, unusual holidays are hard to resist. They're also an awesome source of visual content inspiration. There's an idea for a cool image to create almost daily. Coca-Cola does a great job of using unusual holidays in their social media marketing. They published these images of cute animals to celebrate National Polar Bear Day. To find holidays and observances, you can check these useful lists of unusual holidays and days of the year for inspiration. #5: Ask Viewers to Contribute You don't have to use your own visuals to capture your viewers' attention. Flip the script and ask your viewers to contribute their images. People love seeing their work promoted by a brand, and it makes them feel appreciated and special. On your social channels, ask viewers to submit designs, logos, photographs, drawings or anything else uniquely suited to your product. Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest are fantastic platforms for this style of campaign. Here are two easy-to-implement visual contest ideas to engage your audience and create more visual context around your brand. Caption Contests Publish an interesting image and ask your reader...

3 Psychology Principles That Boost Social Media Engagement

3 Psychology Principles That Boost Social Media Engagement

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are your social media posts getting enough engagement? Do you want tips for connecting with your audience? Social media engagement is largely determined by how well your social posts trigger action from your target audience. In this article you'll discover how to boost social media engagement by incorporating psychological triggers in your posts. Listen to this article: #1: Focus on a Desire In Nobel Prize-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman's book, Thinking, Fast and Slow, he shared this idea: "A general 'law of least effort' applies to cognitive as well as physical exertion. The law asserts that if there are several ways of achieving the same goal, people will eventually gravitate to the least demanding course of action." To apply this principle to your social content, you should keep it simple. In the GetResponse post below, they show that they recognize social media marketers want their email subscribers to feel as if they're having a real conversation with the brand. To do that, GetResponse suggests that marketers need to "use these strategies." The post also incorporates the word "want" ("if you want your subscribers to feel as if they're talking to a real person"). This word triggers a desire in readers' brains that convinces them that, yes, they can do this. Additionally, GetResponse captured the idea of simplicity in the article linked to in the post: 7 Strategies to Give Your Email Campaign a Human Touch. By presenting content in a simple, straightforward way, readers begin to believe that it's not as hard to connect with their audience through email as they might think and that they've found a solution to their problem. Key takeaway: You'll get more engagement with your content if you make your audience believe that they can do something. Walk readers through the hard stuff and break it down in easy-to-digest chunks of information so they can take action quickly and easily. #2: Appeal to Knowledge Seekers There is nothing people love more than an explanation. In fact, in the well-known Xerox study, Ellen Langer and her colleagues conducted a simple experiment to see how people reacted when someone tried to cut in line at the Xerox machine. Ellen discovered that she was allowed to cut the line more frequently when she explained to people why she needed to. The word "why" is one of the trigger words you can use in your own social media marketing. Use "why" to ignite readers’ brains to want to search for the answer to a question. Eric Enge from Stone Temple Consulting used this strategy to create the Here's Why video series for his target audience. In the Here's Why post below, Eric poses a question to reader: Why Is SEO So Hard? If you weren't thinking about that question before, you likely are now. Why is SEO so hard, anyway? Eric provides just enough information to grab the audience's attention. He tells them what they can expect and how they will benefit from watching the 5-minute video. Key takeaway: Communicate to your audience why they need something and how they're going to get it by reading your content, watching your video or using your product. #3: Tap Into the Fear of Missing Out It's human nature to be apprehensive about being left out. We want to be in the know and be where the action is happening. We want to be included. If we say no to an opportunity, we fear we'll miss out on something that could be of great benefit to us. For example, if there's an important conference in your industry, you may be compelled to attend because you fear you'll miss out on great opportunities that other people in your industry will be afforded. With a good industry conference, you can build your brand and business by networking with new and long-time colleagues. You can also attend sessions that help you improve your craft. The opportunity is so compelling that you're afraid if you don't attend, you'll read lots of enthusiastic posts about it in your ...

5 Unusual Tips to Improve Your SEO With Social Media

5 Unusual Tips to Improve Your SEO With Social Media

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want to rank higher in search engines? Interested in ways to use your social accounts to improve your SEO? Social media has a significant impact on your search results, and a strong social presence can boost your search rankings. In this article you'll discover five ways to use social media to improve your search rankings. Listen to this article: #1: Build Links With Your Social Channels Google used to put a high value on link building in their search rankings, no matter what quality of links you were building. When people figured this out and started manipulating rankings with fake or low-quality links to their site, Google started to focus on higher-quality links. Links on social media are often considered higher-quality links, because social sites have a high web authority from the get-go. Even if your Facebook page is new, it's likely to rank highly (and maybe even surpass your website) thanks to Facebook's overall high authority. It may sound obvious, but make sure that you include a working link to your website not only in your content, but also in every social profile you have. In addition to increasing traffic to your site, it's also highly valuable for link building. When it comes to link building within content, post content like new products or blog posts to your social profiles to encourage sharing. For example, you could create a relevant YouTube video for each blog post and embed it in the post, capitalizing on the high web authority to send traffic to your site and increase search rankings. #2: Grow Your Follower Base Pages with a lot of high-quality followers rank better in searches. High-quality followers are real followers on your social channels, and a large percentage of them engage or interact with you in some form. This interaction might be repinning pins, retweeting your content or sending you a tweet, placing reviews on Google+ or engaging with your posts on Facebook. Social signals are a very real factor when it comes to SEO. Search engines look at social signals to find out how often you're posting to your social media accounts, how many people interact with you and if there are social-sharing elements available to visitors to your site. There's no point in trying to outsmart the algorithms with fake likes on Facebook. Low-quality followers are not good for you. Not only will Facebook penalize you for fake likes, search engines like Google will punish you with lower rankings, too. So, make sure you're steadily gaining a solid base of followers that are interacting with you and your content, and encourage them to share, engage and interact with you. #3: Make Your Content Searchable and Sharable Pinterest is a great example of a social platform that makes your content both searchable and sharable. Pinterest encourages sharing to a great extent. Users post pins they like to their boards, and share them with other Pinterest users. Many social accounts give you the option of keeping your content private, or relatively so. On YouTube, you can have unlisted videos, and only people who have links to the videos can watch them. Pinterest allows secret boards, and Twitter gives you the option to have a private profile. When it comes to your business, you want all of your social accounts to be public, and you want all of your content to be searchable. For example, for your Facebook profile, you have the option to make your posts searchable in search engines. To do this, go to your Facebook privacy settings and enable the option Do You Want Other Search Engines to Link to Your Timeline?, shown here. The more people who see your posts, the more people who might share it. Encouraging sharing (including through methods like Facebook contests) is a great way to increase your search rankings. #4: Use Keywords in Your Posts Keywords are important for your website, blog and paid ad campaigns,

Analyzing Your Content With Google Analytics: How to Know What Works

Analyzing Your Content With Google Analytics: How to Know What Works

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you study your website's Google Analytics? Want to go beyond reporting what you see? To discover how to analyze content using Google Analytics, I interview Andy Crestodina. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Andy Crestodina, author of Content Chemistry (3rd edition) and co-founder of Orbit Media (a Chicago-based web design agency). Andy is a Google Analytics expert. Andy will explore how to analyze your educational and sales content using Google Analytics. You'll discover what mistakes marketers make with analytics. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Analyzing Your Content With Google Analytics Andy's start in analytics Andy began doing analytics in 2000, even before Google Analytics was a thing. Andy created websites for clients, and realized there was more to it than building the site. To help someone get results, you need to have a lot of activity around it, and the only way to measure that activity is to look at the stats. Back then, everyone used Webtrends, which was software that downloaded all of the log files and then ran a program to generate charts. Then, Google Analytics came along and revolutionized the industry. Andy talks about Google Analytics then versus now, as well as how it compares to the tools he used in the past. Since Google Analytics doesn't have access to log files, it does everything through JavaScript on web pages, which talks to cookies on visitors' computers and sends the data back to Google. The old tools showed the specific amount of time someone spends on pages and how they move through the site. In some ways the data was more accurate, because it looked at the actual log files that were sitting on the server. Google Analytics is based on JavaScript, which might be turned off, and talking to cookies, which might not be accepted. Google Analytics does lots of things that we didn't have access to before, Andy explains. No one talked about bounce rates and other metrics we now watch all the time. Even though the old tools were based on sometimes better data (the log files), they did a much more basic analysis. Now we get a lot more granular metrics we can use to make decisions. Plus, even though there are other analytics tools out there, Google Analytics blows everything else away. Listen to the show to discover Google Analytics' original name and the meaning of UTM. Mistakes marketers make with Google Analytics Andy says there are a handful of important things marketers need to do when they get started with Google Analytics, such as filter out traffic using an IP filter and set up goals. What people do not do as well is use analytics for analysis. Andy explains how it's common for people to use Google Analytics for reporting; to look at charts and see a line go up or down. However, not enough people use Google Analytics as a decision support tool. Marketers need to ask a question, come up with a hypothesis and test it out. Reporting on your analytics does not affect your marketing, but doing analysis does. Only actions change outcomes. Ask questions like, "How are people finding this site? What social networks are sending us the most traffic? Which social networks are sending us visitors who are most likely to act? Are people on different pages seeing it from different devices?" Andy shares an example from when they were updating a page on their website. It had a right-side rail that showcased samples of sites they built. The question was: Should they put a limited number of items on the sidebar,

6 Ways to Use Advanced Twitter Search for Increased Influence

6 Ways to Use Advanced Twitter Search for Increased Influence

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want to be a recognized expert in your industry? Looking for relevant conversations to weigh in on? Using Twitter's Advanced Search to monitor keywords and conversations can help you connect with influencers and uncover opportunities for thought leadership. In this article you'll discover six ways to use Twitter's Advanced Search to increase your influence in your industry. Listen to this article: #1: Find Conversations to Participate In Doing a keyword search on Twitter is a quick and easy way to find out what people in your industry are talking about, identify accounts to follow, and discover new business opportunities. With Twitter's Advanced Search, you can create complex searches with keywords that are relevant to your industry. To start, choose three or four keywords that are relevant to your industry and use the Boolean search operator "OR" to create a single search for all of your terms. For example, search for "digital marketing" OR "digital marketing advice." Look at the search results to find conversations in your niche. Then join relevant discussions to offer expert advice and build meaningful connections with people in your industry. Use the OR operator to ensure that every key phrase or search term is relevant to your mission. Keep this list updated and weed out the keywords that aren't helping you find the best results. Soon you'll have a filtered list of conversations to review on a daily basis. You can also add keywords like "recommend" to find prospects looking for services you offer. You can also use a keyword search to optimize your own Twitter profile. Add keywords to your bio to help other users find you. Including key phrases (such as "public speaker" and "charity worker") may help you uncover new opportunities. #2: Monitor Hashtags for Media Opportunities You can follow specific hashtags and keywords to discover people who are looking for thoughtful comments or quotes. For example, the hashtag #journorequest is popular among journalists and industry writers. You can create an advanced search that pairs both #journorequest and your key industry terms ("skincare expert" or "facial expert," for example) to find opportunities for free coverage in print and online. Once you've uncovered opportunities through hashtag monitoring, reach out to users to share your expert insights. This helps you get media coverage for your business and create meaningful connections. #3: Connect and Converse With Industry Peers Your influence is often measured by the network you keep. Use Twitter's Advanced Search filters to find key contacts and people to follow in your industry. Filter Results by Account In Twitter's search box, search for a keyword (or group of keywords). Then to filter your results, click More Options and select Accounts to see only those accounts that contain your keywords. Once you create a tailored list of key industry contacts, follow those users, add them to a list, or use a monitoring tool like TweetDeck to track what they're saying. Filter Results by People You Follow You can also limit your search to only the users you follow. To do this, enter your search term (for example, "social media data"). Then filter your results by clicking More Options and selecting From People I Follow. Your search results will only include tweets that match your search query and are from the accounts you follow. Filter Results by Date You can add a date range to find conversations relevant to your topics of interest and occurring within the last few weeks from users you follow. This gives you the opportunity to add comments, share your insights, and show thought leadership within your online peer group. Filter Results by People You can also use Twitter search to find previous conversations you've had with your contacts. This is a great way to revive relationships and build camaraderie.

A Complete Guide to Crushing Your First Snapchat Takeover

by Shama @ Marketing Zen

If one of your brand’s target audiences is young adults, then this blog post is for you. Snapchat, the social media messaging app that lets users post images and videos that disappear after a brief period of time, is dominated by younger demographics. A full 60% of Snapchat’s 300 million total monthly users are under the age of 25, while 26% are between the ages of 25-34. This means that Snapchat can be a hugely effective tool for getting your brand message out to a younger, highly engaged audience. While there are plenty of ways to use Snapchat to your advantage, for the purposes of this post we’re going to focus on one tactic: Snapchat takeovers. What is a Snapchat takeover? Snapchat takeovers are a way to get your brand message out to a whole new set of eyes. The way they usually work is that a brand will give an influencer access to its Snapchat account for a set amount of time – usually a day. The influencer then “takes over” the account, sharing their own images and messages with the brand’s followers as a Snapchat Story. There’s plenty of cross-promotion leading up to the big day, so both the...

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The post A Complete Guide to Crushing Your First Snapchat Takeover appeared first on Marketing Zen.

Medium for Business: The Complete Guide for Marketers

Medium for Business: The Complete Guide for Marketers

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Have you considered publishing your content on Medium? Are you looking for a way to distribute your ideas to a larger audience? In this post you'll discover what marketers think about Medium, along with a step-by-step guide to using Medium. Listen to this article: Why Medium? Jay Baer, a New York Times bestselling author and well-known keynote speaker, has been posting on Medium for over a year. He uses Medium for "...posts (sometimes original, sometimes repurposed) that are more opinion-based or take a stronger stand." He defines Medium as "...LinkedIn's cool younger brother who wears concert T-shirts all the time, but also checks the Dow Jones average on his iPhone." Who can be successful on Medium? Baer explains, "I think businesses can have success on Medium, but perhaps more so as individuals rather than as businesses per se. In essence, what I do there is on behalf of Convince & Convert, through me. The same can work for other companies who have 'thought leaders' willing and able to take the time to post content on Medium that solicits a response." Mitch Joel, president of Mirum Agency, also adds, "It's not just a place to publish, but an impressive platform for content distribution. As an infovore, it's also an amazing place to discover new voices and content -- probably more powerful than just picking up a link from Facebook or Twitter." He plans to add Medium to his publishing schedule soon. With those things in mind, here are some of the benefits of using Medium as your platform for publishing insightful content: Medium received an estimated 35 million visitors in November 2015, with 36.78% from the United States, according to SimilarWeb. When new users join, they automatically follow Medium's account. Their current number of followers is 726K, so there are at least 726K users on Medium. Medium allows you and your readers to focus on one thing: the content you create. When you join Medium with your Twitter or Facebook account, you get a built-in audience because all of your Twitter followers and Facebook friends who use Medium will automatically become followers of your Medium account. As your Twitter followers and Facebook friends join Medium, they will automatically follow you as well. Why It Might Be Time to Completely Change Your #SocialMedia #Strategy on @Medium https://t.co/P6AZ8MoD44 #smm — Jay Baer (@jaybaer) November 24, 2015 Medium users receive an email digest with the latest stories (posts) by the people and publications they follow delivered to their inbox. Thus, all of your followers from Twitter on Medium will get notified of your latest stories (based on their settings). If your stories are recommended by Medium users who have large followings, your stories will be shown to their followers on the Medium homepage as well as in their followers' email digest (based on their settings). If your stories become popular, they have the chance of being featured as a Top Story to the entire Medium community or as a Medium Staff Pick sent in the email digest. Those are some pretty exciting stats and benefits for marketers looking to reach new audiences through content. What results can you expect? Kiki Schirr, co-founder of Fittr, posts to her Medium regularly. She has found that "The great thing about using Medium is also its biggest downside: Medium comes with an automatic audience that is easily tapped, but difficult to transfer. If you're writing a post that needs 10,000 views, Medium is by far the best tool for capturing them. However, if your goal is to build an audience or brand, you should at the very least be cross-posting your content to a private domain. By posting a small piece each day I was able to reach 10,000 subscribers to my publication in 66 days. I think that's an exciting prospect for marketers." Now, let's look at how to use Medium. #1: Sign Up for Your Medium Account To get started,

SearchCap: Google iOS app trends, difficult clients & content SEO

by Barry Schwartz @ SearchCap: Daily Search Engine News Recap

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: Google iOS app trends, difficult clients & content SEO appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Snapchat and Podcasting Growth: What the Research Reveals

Snapchat and Podcasting Growth: What the Research Reveals

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Wondering if you should get into Snapchat? Is podcasting something you're considering? To discover more, I interview Tom Webster from Edison Research about his latest study on Snapchat and podcasting adoption. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Tom Webster, vice president of strategy and marketing at Edison Research and co-host of the Marketing Companion podcast. Tom is a specialist in consumer behavior and media consumption. Tom will explore his brand-new research from The Infinite Dial, focused on Snapchat and podcast adoption. You'll discover reasons to embrace Snapchat and podcasting for your business. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Snapchat Growth About the study Research from The Infinite Dial series dates back to 1998, according to Tom, and it's the longest-running study on digital habits, behaviors, and consumption. They have trending graphs for areas, such as Internet radio, that go back to 1998. Plus, they've measured all kinds of behaviors and patterns in relation to consumption of audio, video, social, and mobile. Tom has been involved with the study and has been the voice of the studies on webinars since 2004. When the series started in 1998, it was focused more on digital audio. While today's brands and streaming audio like Pandora and Spotify weren't around back then, there were plenty of others. For example there was Broadcast.com, which Mark Cuban sold to Yahoo, NetRadio, Spinner, AOL Radio, and lots of other fledgling brands, Tom explains. The survey was a means to track them and put them in their place in the universe. As behaviors started to migrate to various media (as opposed to the text-driven medium that it had been previously), The Infinite Dial started tracking that too. Over the years, they added podcasting, social media, and so on. Essentially, if people do it online, The Infinite Dial is interested in measuring how it's consumed. The Infinite Dial's goal was always to create the survey of record in the various fields covered, so they spend nearly six figures in hard costs on mobile and landline telephone sampling to make a study that's random, representative, and projectable to the United States population. Tom loves coming out with new facts every year that corroborate what he sees people do online. Listen to the show to learn more about the survey sampling and why they survey via telephone. Podcast growth One of the things Tom loves about doing survey research is that although it reflects the current state of America, it typically lags behind what the digerati think. It can lag by quite a bit, he says, but if it's a real thing, it eventually gets there. The Infinite Dial added podcast tracking back in 2007. Two years ago, before Serial popularized podcasting, research showed that 15% of Americans 12+ listened to a podcast in the past 12 months. While that's a huge number (tens and tens of millions of Americans), it had been growing steadily, but not exponentially. Podcasting inched up from 9% in 2008 to 11% to 2009. And to 12% in 2010. For a short time, podcasting plateaued before jumping to 15% in 2014. After Serial came out, there was enormous advertiser, brand, and insider interest in podcasting. Listenership went from 15% in 2014 to 17% in 2015. In 2016, podcast listening has surpassed 21% already. That's a 24% increase year over year in the percentage of Americans who listened to a podcast. The Serial effect didn't happen immediately, Tom continues, although it made people a lot more aware of the on-demand content out ther...

Social Media Evolution: What Does the Future of Social Marketing Look Like?

Social Media Evolution: What Does the Future of Social Marketing Look Like?

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Are you amazed at how much social media has changed over the last few years? Want to discover what's next? To explore the evolution of social media, I interview Brian Solis. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Brian Solis, a principal analyst at the Altimeter Group. He's written eight books, including Engage and What's the Future of Business? His newest book is called X: The Experience When Business Meets Design. Brian will explore how social media has changed and how it continues to evolve. You'll discover how marketers can use moments of truth to engage their customers. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Social Media Evolution From Engage until now Brian recalls that in the late 90s and early 2000s, he helped with development around what became social media and realized that two-way digital marketing aspect was going to be phenomenal. He says his book Engage was the culmination of all that work put into a book designed to help anyone in marketing or business really understand how to become social. After Engage, Brian says, the world started to change and technology started to accelerate. This is something he studies as both an analyst and an anthropologist. Brian has continued to write books, do research and speak on how to bridge the world of brand or business with technology and people. He says social has become part of that process, as has mobile and digital transformation, wearables, etc. When asked about major changes in social media that have taken place between his first book and today, Brian talks about creating an infographic called The Wheel of Disruption while he was writing What's the Future of Business? The infographic showed all of the things that were disrupting industries, with an emphasis on brand, marketing and engagement. He explains that then and now, the three things Fred Wilson once called The Golden Triangle are at the core of everything. Brian goes on to discuss how wearables, augmented reality and services like Uber, Instacart, Postmates, Amazon, Drone Delivery and Google Express are creating disruption not only on technology fronts, but also on behavioral and expectation fronts at a human level. Listen to the show to hear Brian explain how the disruption happening today has grand implications for every business in every industry. The importance of experience Brian shares that while many marketers, brand strategists and executives say experience is one of the most important things to deliver, that means different things to different people. From great customer service to great product design, it's all over the map. Brian believes that everything that happens when you buy, use, shop for or have a problem with something are moments that contribute to the overall experience. Brian shares why he thinks we should be able to define and design experiences as part of business and branding to build better relationships, and why he believes experience is the next competitive advantage. He says that while some savvy organizations have introduced efforts to define a brand experience (BX), a customer experience (CX) and a user experience (UX), all of these efforts are disparate. Thus, by default or by design, the experience is disconnected. Listen to the show to hear why Brian wants to bring all experiences under one banner of X, where everything works together. Businesses doing a great job with experience Brian explains that he chose the companies he talks about in his book not because they are examples of holistic experiences,

6 Productivity Tools for Twitter

6 Productivity Tools for Twitter

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you struggling to keep up with your Twitter activities? Looking for a way to streamline your Twitter marketing? The right productivity tools will help you manage your Twitter marketing more effectively and free up your time for other tasks. In this article you'll discover six tools and techniques that will boost your productivity on Twitter. Listen to this article: #1: Manage Twitter Messages With AgoraPulse Keeping on top of your Twitter mentions and messages can take a huge amount of time each day. According to research from Brandwatch, retail brands receive an average of 821 mentions per day on Twitter, but only manage to respond to 40 of them. You can do better than that by using a social media management tool like AgoraPulse. It allows you to display your mentions, direct messages, and monitoring alerts in a social inbox so you can respond as you would with an email. When you review or reply to messages, they're archived, which makes it easy to see which messages you've dealt with. The social inbox for your Twitter account is split into an Inbox tab for your incoming mentions and messages and a Monitoring tab for retweets and search queries. Whenever you reply to or review a message, it's highlighted and archived. This feature is particularly useful to archive low-value or spammy direct messages. Have you ever received one of those automated “thank you for following me” direct messages or something similar? With the Direct Messages filter, you can quickly select all direct messages that don't need a reply and review them in one go, which is a huge time-saver. Once you review or reply to all of your mentions, you'll get that lovely inbox zero feeling. Go to the Monitoring tab to view all of your retweets and searches. This tab is for less urgent messages, while the Inbox focuses on the most actionable messages. Select the Type filter to show only your recent searches or retweets. You can then reply to or like them on an individual basis, or via a bulk review if no action needs to be taken. If you work with a team or have a virtual assistant, you can assign individual messages to team members. To do so, view the message, click the Assign button, and select the relevant team member. You can easily see which messages have been assigned to which team members. If you have a social media team, using a social media management tool is important from a security standpoint. With AgoraPulse, you'll get full control over your team members and avoid having to share your Twitter password. Set aside two or three fixed times every day to attend to your Twitter engagement. Make sure you cap the time for these sessions (for example 10-15 minutes) so you can spend the rest of your day focusing on other areas of your business. AgoraPulse also integrates with Facebook and Instagram and offers reports and publishing features. #2: Automate Blog Content Shares With missinglettr When you post an article to your blog, how many times do you share it on Twitter? It's unusual for people to send just one tweet out when they publish blog content. If you want to maximize the engagement potential for your blog posts, use a tool like missinglettr to set up a drip marketing campaign for them. It allows you to publicize each individual article regularly via Twitter over the course of a year. To get started, set up your free account and connect your blog's RSS feed. Once you do that, missinglettr will start checking for new blog posts. When it detects a new article, it analyzes the content and creates a Twitter marketing campaign for that article for the year. The campaign consists of a series of tweets linking to the article and can include summaries, quotes, images, and a call to action. missinglettr will notify you when the campaign is ready so you can review it. Click the Review link to review the campaign schedule for the article.

The Cost of SEO Services

by Jonathan Hochman @ Hochman Consultants

There is no standard definition of SEO services, so it is not easy to compare the costs of one provider to another. We’ve seen many SEO packages in the marketplace that are either too expensive, or too cheap. The best…

The post The Cost of SEO Services appeared first on Hochman Consultants.

How to Connect With Local Customers via Social Media

How to Connect With Local Customers via Social Media

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Want to increase your visibility in your local market? Wondering how social media can help? When you understand which features on social media support local marketing, you can focus the power of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram to expand influence in your little corner of the world. In this article you'll discover how to connect with local customers on the top social media networks. Listen to this article: #1: Connect With Customers on Facebook There may be over 1.4 billion active users on Facebook, but only a fraction of them live near your business. Fortunately, there are ways you can overcome the low organic reach of Facebook pages to engage your local customers. Promote Facebook check-ins at your business. When people check in, they're giving you free visibility in the news feed. Whether you incentivize check-ins (free coffee) or simply display visual reminders for customers to check in, this is a great way to promote your business to a local audience. Boost your posts. Facebook has added some targeting tools to boosted posts, including the ability to target lists you've uploaded through Facebook Ads Manager. Target a segmented email list of local people to make sure they see your important posts. Post an update to your business page, and then share it as yourself. This allows you to reach a wider audience. By sharing it personally, you can decide whom to share the post with and focus on people in your local community. Don't go overboard with this tactic, however. Your family may not enjoy an endless series of updates about your free ebook. Promote Facebook events. Hosting local events such as social media breakfasts, lunch and learns, or business after hours increases your visibility both online and off. Create a Facebook event and share it with your fans and friends or promote it. Everyone invited to the event will continue to see it in their notifications and in upcoming events unless they decline the invite. Again, focus your invites on people who live and work near you. Target Facebook ads to a local audience. Use the tools in the Ads Manager and Power Editor to target people based on their location. You can also upload your segmented email list to target local people with your ads. Create a lookalike audience based on your list. (Remember to add a filter so that all of the resulting people are still local.) #2: Reach Out to Your Community on Twitter Twitter may not be the social media behemoth that Facebook is, but it can be valuable for marketing to a local audience. Both your Twitter profile and your business's profile provide many opportunities to connect with the local community. For example, you can include a recognizable landmark in your header photo, mention your home team allegiance in your bio, or list your city or state in the location field. It's also helpful to set up Twitter lists, which allow you to create segmented groups of interesting people and businesses around a certain topic. If you're not using lists, you're probably swimming in noise in your news feed. For instance, I have a Mainers list to keep tabs on what people are saying in my home state and an Influencers list to track industry trends. Use a tool like Hootsuite or TweetDeck to pull lists into columns and improve your signal-to-noise ratio on Twitter. Lists need to be created manually. Chances are high, though, that someone has already created a list of people near you, whether you live in Oatmeal, Texas or Sandwich, Massachusetts. Look at the lists of some of the more connected people near you, and if you see one that's interesting, subscribe to it. Use Twitter's Advanced Search as a good way to find leads for your local business. Suppose you own a knitting store and want to find local knitters on Twitter. Go to Advanced Search and search for "knitting" or "knitters" or "yarn" within 15 miles of your store. On the results page,

Marketing You: How to Play to Your Unique Strengths

Marketing You: How to Play to Your Unique Strengths

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you struggle when it comes to marketing yourself? Are you wondering what your unique strengths are? To learn how to promote yourself based on these strengths, I interview Sally Hogshead for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. Keep reading to discover more. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Sally Hogshead, author of Fascinate and How the World Sees You. She was an award-winning copywriter at the age of 23 and worked with brands such as Nike, Target and BMW. She's one of the few women in the Speaker Hall of Fame and a popular keynote speaker (Sally keynoted Social Media Marketing World) and a simply fascinating woman. Sally shares how you can be successful and fascinating in your work and your life. You'll discover how fascination can increase your value, put you at an advantage and enable you to get more satisfaction out of your work. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Marketing You The journey from Fascinate to How the World Sees You Sally explains that the hardest part for her when writing a book is when it goes into the print stage. When her last book Fascinate was ready to be shipped to stores, she felt at a loss and didn't know what to do with herself. She started to think about doing a personality assessment, which was based on the same system that she had created for brands. So instead of it being about how consumers see a brand, it's about how the world sees you. Once the test was ready, it was put out on social media for free and it became a huge part of her business. It surpassed Fascinate. Sally soon realized that people really wanted to know how to make themselves—not their brand—fascinating. She pivoted her entire company and started to study more about it and go deep into what makes one person perceived as valuable, and someone else perceived as a commodity. Once you have done the assessment, it becomes clear why certain people like, respect and admire you, and why you turn others off. The key here is that you don't have to change who you are; you have to become more of who you are. Listen to the show to find out why it helps to see the patterns among your work colleagues, and how it can help you communicate more effectively with them. How social media has played a part in the development of this entire concept Before the days of social media, our average attention span used to be 20 minutes. Now with social media, it's around 9 seconds. People can now form an opinion of you instantly on social media. With that in mind, you now have to find a way to front-load your value. It's your opportunity to make the most accurate and authentic first impression. You'll hear what Sally and her team discovered when they ran a one-year free beta test for about 30,000 people, and why it led them to turn it into a paid model. At present, the Fascination Advantage Assessment costs $37. However, you can get free access to an in-depth, custom report, which identifies your personality advantages. Check out the key takeaways at the end of this article to find out how to enter. Listen to the show to hear the two main things that people who took the initial assessment wanted to know. Fascination and the research behind it  Sally states that fascination is a state of intense focus. When you're fascinated by something, you are totally focused on that one particular thing. It can be a person, an idea, a movie, a book or a product. As part of the initial market research that Sally carried...

Content for Business: How to Build Your Business on a Solid Content Foundation

Content for Business: How to Build Your Business on a Solid Content Foundation

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you have a great idea for a business? Wondering if content marketing will help move the needle? To discover what it takes to build a content-driven business, I interview Joe Pulizzi. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Joe Pulizzi, founder of the Content Marketing Institute, author of the book Epic Content Marketing and the founder of Content Marketing World, the leading conference for content marketers. Joe's latest book is Content Inc.: How Entrepreneurs Use Content to Build Massive Audiences and Create Radically Successful Businesses. Joe will explore how you can build a sustainable small business with smart content marketing. You'll discover the six steps to take to create a content business in any niche. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. How to subscribe on iPhone. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Content for Business When and why Joe started the Content Marketing Institute Joe shares how he got into the content marketing industry. He was vice president of custom media (also known as content marketing) at business publishing company Penton Media until 2007. At Penton, Joe and his team helped advertisers who wanted to do something unique tell their stories. For example, if a company like Microsoft wanted to tell a story to an executive audience, Joe and his team would help them create an ongoing newsletter, a magazine, blog series or webinar series. Joe did that for seven years. Joe left Penton at the end of March 2007 and wrote his first blog post titled "Why Content Marketing?" on April 26, 2007. That led up to Joe launching Junta42, which he says was basically the eHarmony for content marketing. The idea was to match brand sites that wanted to outsource some portion of the content process (creation or distribution) with agencies that would pay for the service to get the leads. Joe explains how in 2008, with no money, no paid distribution and about 2,000 subscribers, he decided it was time to build relationships with influencers. He started a research project called The Top 100 Content Marketing Blogs. (I was on the list first for White Papers and then Social Media Examiner.) He notified everybody who was on the list, and it just took off. Fast-forward to 2009, Joe shares, the model was working and they matched up about 1,000 projects. However, they were still having trouble getting companies to pay for a subscription to the service, even though they were driving leads to them. After his best case study (they sent a $1 million+ customer to an agency, and the agency decided not to renew their subscription), it finally hit Joe that this business was not going to work. Although Joe was "in love with his product," he finally figured out the key was to fall in love with your audience and focus on their needs and pain points. His audience was asking for training, education, consulting and speaking. They weren't even ready for a matching service, because they didn't even know how to create a content marketing strategy. Joe pivoted to the education and training concept and launched Content Marketing Institute six months later. That was May 2010. "At that moment we said we were going to create the leading online destination for content marketing, the leading magazine and the leading event," Joe recalls. "And within two years we were able to do that." Listen to the show to hear how Joe and I first connected, as well as the similarities between our projects. Why now is the time to get into a content-driven business Content Inc. is Joe's fourth book. The other three are content marketing–related and f...

The Social Media Examiner Story: From Blog to Conference

The Social Media Examiner Story: From Blog to Conference

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Wonder how the Social Media Examiner blog got started? Interested in how we grew a live conference from an online publication? To share the evolution of Social Media Examiner and Social Media Marketing World, Ray Edwards will interview me. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, Ray Edwards of The Ray Edwards Show takes the mic to get the backstory on how Social Media Examiner went from publishing a blog to hosting a live conference. You'll discover the behind-the-scenes story of how I founded Social Media Examiner more than seven years ago and how we decided to start our own conference. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: The Social Media Examiner Story The Beginning of Everything Prior to launching Social Media Examiner, I was writing white papers for clients and I also authored a book called Writing White Papers. Somewhere along the way, I started a weekly newsletter, which included interviews with experts, pieces written by experts, and tips and techniques. I started covering social media and how it could be used to generate more leads for white papers. Subsequently, I reached out to Copyblogger and MarketingProfs, and wrote some articles for them. The turning point came after I sent a LinkedIn request to Ann Handley, chief content officer for MarketingProfs, and she asked if I was on Facebook. After opening a Facebook account, I was immersed in a different world. Then, I went to a small conference in San Diego and met Paul Colligan, Warren Whitlock (co-author of Twitter Revolution), and Mari Smith. As a result, I decided to do an online conference under my white paper business. (Up to that point I did teleclasses, where people would pay $39/month to hear me interview people like Bob Bly, Peter Bowerman, and others in the copywriting world.) I sold a couple of hundred tickets for the Copywriting Success Summit, more than I ever had for my teleclasses, and the conference was all done via webinars. This led to doing the Social Media Success Summit, for which we sold around 700 tickets. I felt I was onto something, so I searched domain names at GoDaddy, found SocialMediaExaminer.com, and immediately registered a trademark. I had the opportunity to speak at BlogWorld and MarketingProf's B2B Summit in October 2009. Deciding that would be the time to launch, I hustled to build Social Media Examiner and reached out to all of my friends, asking if they would write one article a month until it didn't work for them anymore. I officially launched Social Media Examiner on October 12, 2009. Listen to the show to learn which connections Ray and I share from the early days of social media. A Focus on Quality Content When we launched, blogs were opinion outlets and I wanted to be a resource. That's why we're known for how-to content and why our tagline is still "Your guide to the social media jungle." I knew if we could create content with a certain level of depth or richness to it, it would be smart in the long run; each of our articles is at least 1,000 words long. And we've invested heavily in the quality of our content. We've always had at least two or three, and sometimes up to five, editors working on all of the articles and we put at least $1,000 into development for each article. Our vision statement is, "All we serve is quality and we serve all with excellence." I've been in this business for seven years, and almost everyone who started in this space has moved on. It just goes to show you can win in the long run if you consistently deliver excellent value.

Blogging Success: How to Create Content People Love

Blogging Success: How to Create Content People Love

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you want to drive more traffic to your website? Would you like to create content that people would go crazy for? To learn the secrets of attention-grabbing blog posts that generate traffic, I interview Michael Hyatt for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Michael Hyatt, author of Platform: Get Noticed in a Noisy World, former CEO of Thomas Nelson Publishers, and the host of the This Is Your Life podcast. Michael shares his experiences as a successful blogger and content creator. You'll learn why headlines and photos are the most attention-grabbing aspects of your articles. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Content Creation Michael tells the story of when he first started blogging in 2004. He was the CEO at Thomas Nelson and saw blogging as a means to communicate with his own employees. It was a way to be innovative, rather than sending out standard email newsletters. It wasn't until someone suggested opening it up to the public that he thought it was a cool idea and maybe could become an archive for his best thinking. Listen to the show to hear about Michael's blogging schedule when he first started. What evergreen content brings to your website Michael's blog today averages around 300-400 blog comments a day. Michael explains that about half of his traffic comes from older posts. These include posts that he wrote 2-3 years ago that still get a huge amount of comments today. Michael shares how he promotes his older posts. One of the tactics he uses is to bulk upload and schedule tweets in SocialOomph for older articles such as this one: Our words carry enormous weight. More than we sometimes think. "How Our Words Impact Others." mhyatt.us/gIC8Vn — Michael Hyatt (@MichaelHyatt) November 18, 2012   Michael had the idea from when he was working in the book publishing world. Publishers have two types of books: new books (newly published or yet to be released) and a backlist (an archive of content). For large publishing companies such as Thomas Nelson, 50-60% of their revenue can come from their backlist. Most bloggers don't have a strategy for this. They write it, it disappears and then it's gone forever. Listen to the show to find out Michael's secret for keeping his older blog posts up to date and continuing to drive more traffic. How to write killer blog posts Over time Michael has written about 1,400 posts. You'll learn how he tries to start from the reader's perspective and frame everything in terms of his or her needs. Somebody once said, "People are tuned into WIIFM (Whats In It For Me)." You have to write from this particular viewpoint if you're going to be successful. Look at what other people's hopes, fears, frustrations and obstacles are. And don't assume that everybody knows what you know. Michael talks about how a lot of his how-to articles stem from what he needs to find out and then he documents the process for his readers. These articles bring him a ton of traffic every day. Listen to the show to learn why the how-to articles have been the most successful for Michael. Topics to write about Michael explains how he uses "intentional leadership" as a filter for content on his website. He shares how he might look at a current event and reframe it into a leadership lesson. You'll also learn how to decide what to publish on your site and how to stay focused on being good at what you do. Listen to the show to find out why giving away you...

Facebook Ads Strategy: How Marketers Need to Alter Their Techniques

Facebook Ads Strategy: How Marketers Need to Alter Their Techniques

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use Facebook ads? Want to learn the latest strategies? To discover what's changed with Facebook ads and how to get better results, I interview Rick Mulready. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Rick Mulready, the host of the Art of Paid Traffic podcast. He's a Facebook Ads coach and has numerous courses on Facebook advertising, including the FB ADvantage. Rick will explore what's changed with Facebook ads and share new strategies that work. You'll discover best practices for video ads, carousel ads, and more. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Ads Strategy Rick's story Rick spent 12 years in the corporate online advertising space, working with big companies like AOL, Yahoo, Funny or Die, and Vibrant Media. He did everything from banner and video ads to search and text advertising. Rick got into Facebook ads around 2010, while still in the corporate world. This was when Facebook was making a name for itself as a social platform, when small businesses could post on their pages and people would see it, and when Facebook started to allow business to advertise. Rick loved Facebook advertising. He saw the power in it, and taught himself as much as he could. He started running campaigns for entrepreneur friends while still in corporate, and the rest is history. Rick left his job at the end of 2012 and has been specializing in Facebook ads ever since. For the first couple of years, Rick focused on social media in general. He hosted the Inside Social Media podcast, where he interviewed the heads of social media from some of the biggest brands around the world. That was great, yet Rick still gravitated toward the Facebook ad side. In January 2015, Rick started the Art of Paid Traffic podcast, where he covers Facebook advertising and everything else to do with paid traffic such as YouTube ads, copywriting, landing pages, metrics, analytics, and so on. It's a combination of case studies, interviews with experts, and solo shows. Listen to the show to learn why only big businesses could really utilize Facebook ads in 2010. How Facebook Ads has evolved A lot has changed in Facebook advertising – such as targeting – over the past year or so, Rick says. For instance, you can upload your email list and create a targeted audience out of them. Also, you can retarget people coming to your website or a landing page. When most people think of targeting, they think of interest targeting, which is targeting fans of another page or somebody in their space. Facebook has recently rolled out detailed targeting. Before, if you wanted to target fans of Social Media Examiner or Entrepreneur Magazine, you could only do one or the other. Now, you can set up ads to target people who have an interest in Social Media Examiner and Entrepreneur Magazine. To take it a step further, you can exclude an audience. For instance, target fans of Social Media Examiner and Entrepreneur magazine, but exclude people who like Inc. Magazine. It's a much more detailed subset of that audience. When Facebook reported its Q4 earnings, they basically said their customer is not the advertiser. While they're making money off of advertising, their customers are the 1.5 billion Facebook users. Facebook recognizes that without these users, they won't have people coming to advertise on the platform. Therefore, Facebook is protecting the user experience. They want to make sure advertisers think of value first to take care of Facebook users. While you can still run an ad to an opt-in or registration page,

Google+ Success: What Your Business Needs to Know About Google+

Google+ Success: What Your Business Needs to Know About Google+

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use Google+ for your business? Are you wondering how you can be more successful generating traffic and growing a community with Google+? To learn what your business needs to know about Google+, I interview Martin Shervington for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Martin Shervington, who is a Google+ marketing expert, consultant and executive coach. He manages two Google+ communities, Plus Your Life! and Plus Your Business! and has authored numerous books including Developmental Coaching. Martin shares why he values Google+ and the benefits you can get from it. You'll learn what Google+ can offer your business and the best ways to get started. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Google+ Success Why Google+ and what has it done for your business? Martin explains how he started with Google+ on March 6, 2012, when his book, Developmental Coaching, was out and he was looking for ways to promote it. He considered Twitter, but decided to go with Google+ instead. After a few days of learning everything he could about the platform, he realized how useful it was and started to make notes. People then started to relate to his notes and shared them. You'll find out what type of content he shared and why it gave people a better social experience. Over the last 20 months, Martin has built two communities. Plus Your Life! is very inspirational and about development on the personal side of things, and Plus Your Business! is all about how to use Google+ in business. Martin says that Google+ not only helped with his book, it also allowed him to start blogging too. You'll discover how Google+ helped him  find an audience and why it gave him the ability to express himself more in his writing. Eventually Martin started to blog on his own site because he could move the attention over. He now has 36,000 people a month visit his blog. Martin explains that there are two mechanisms of Google+ that make it unlike other platforms—social and search. When it comes to Google+, the connection between search and social is unique. No other platform has it. Martin says that the punchline to this is that Google+ is Google. Listen to the show to find out why the search engine becomes a personalized content-surfacer based on whom you are connected with, and what you have interacted with in the past. Google+ statistics The latest statistics state that there are 1 billion Google accounts. This number includes accounts for YouTube, Google+ and Gmail. There are 540 million active users, of which 300 million are active in the stream. You'll hear Martin explain in more detail why Google+ is more than just a social site. Listen to the show to find out why Martin believes that in a year, everyone will see that Google has done something amazing with Google+. The difference between Google+ users and other social networks Martin says that whenever a change happens with Google+, people in the Google+ community are wowed by the new features. Everybody gets very excited. There are some great communities that have formed around different niches. It's a positive environment, where everyone is supportive of one another and there is very high engagement. Martin believes that people are excited to spend time there, because they feel part of a community. You'll discover some big news that Google+ has in beta testing right now. Listen to the show to learn how Google has integrated the Goo...

Why Good Enough Just Isn’t Good Enough Anymore!

by Jeffrey_Smith @ SEO Design Solutions™ Blog

You Can’t Be Serious? Let’s face it, times have changed and what worked yesterday has no guarantee of remaining relevant and working tomorrow. What most of us often overlook is that as the web evolves so does our nervous system and how it maps the priorities of how we communicate. Essentially, we develop blinders to Read More

Blogging Tools: Apps to Better Manage Your Blog

Blogging Tools: Apps to Better Manage Your Blog

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you have a blog? Want to improve the content development, publishing and promotion processes? To discover how to streamline your blogging with the best tools, I interview Ian Cleary. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Ian Cleary, the social tools guy. His blog, RazorSocial.com has placed in our Top 10 Social Media Blogs 3 years in a row. He's also the founder of the Digital Influencer Club. Ian will explore marketing tools for bloggers. You'll discover tools for your editorial calendar, search engine optimization, social media, email marketing and more. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Blogging Tools How Ian got into blogging Ian talks about the social media training company he had in Ireland. He says his blog failed because he wasn't particularly passionate about it; he was blogging because people said he should. Ian thinks that's the trap a lot of people fall into. Ian shares how reading Launch helped him realize what he'd done wrong with his blog, so he decided to focus on the tools and tech side of social media. Listen to the show to hear about Ian's first encounter with Mike. Editorial tools and plugins Ian says it doesn't matter if you have a team of one or ten, you still need to plan your blogging. He explains how he and his team use the Status feature of a WordPress plugin called Edit Flow to move posts from Ian to his image person, and then to the editor. Once the editor is finished, the post is ready to publish. Ian also keeps rough ideas for future blog posts in EditFlow under the Pitch status, so he has post ideas ready to write anytime he goes to the blog. CoSchedule is another excellent calendar tool Ian is excited to try. Regardless of the tool you choose, you need a good editorial process, Ian says, even if you use Microsoft Excel to track things in the short-term. Listen to the show to discover some of the limitations of Edit Flow. SEO and research tools Even if you don't know a lot about SEO, Ian explains how the Yoast SEO plugin helps you optimize your content for search in an easy way. If you're creating a piece of content and want to see if there's a way to improve it, Ian suggests using BuzzSumo or Uprise. Both are research tools that let you view lists of content from across the web based on a keyword you search for. The lists show which posts received the most shares, and Ian tell listeners how to review them to make their own content better. Ian explains the process of using Ahrefs to find links to high-ranking articles that are similar to yours but are out of date. He shares how bloggers can reach out to these authors or websites to link to their newly published content instead. Ian also mentions a predictive content analytics tool called InboundWriter. The tool lets you put in the keywords you want to rank for, then gives you a green or a red status to show your chance of getting organic traffic to your content based on those keywords. Finally, Ian shares how bloggers can use SEMrush to see which keywords their competitors rank for in Google search results. He says that when you see what words your competitors are ranking for, you can pull traffic from them by writing better articles based on those keywords. Listen to the show to hear more about InboundWriter. Social promotion tools When you include influential people who are relevant to your niche in your content, there's a good chance they will share that content, which will drive shares and traffic. Ian says Topsy is a great way to find relevant,

3 Ways to Grow Your Audience on Snapchat

3 Ways to Grow Your Audience on Snapchat

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want more followers on Snapchat? Are you taking advantage of every connection option? Using the right tools to their fullest potential will grow your following and increase the chances that others will discover your Snapchat profile. In this article, you'll discover three ways to grow your audience on Snapchat. Listen to this article: #1: Make an In-Person Connection The easiest way to get people to follow you on Snapchat is when you're with them in person, where it's simple to share your username (and make sure you've spelled it correctly) or your snapcode. Add by Username If you want to add someone by username, open Snapchat and tap Add Friends. Then tap Add by Username. Finally, type in the username ("johnleedumas," for example) and tap the plus sign. Add by Snapcode An increasingly popular way to add people to your Snapchat is to give them your snapcode. You'll find your unique snapcode on your home screen. Someone can take a picture of your code with their phone and then easily add you, and vice versa. To add people by snapcode, first you take a picture of their snapcode with your phone. Then open Snapchat and tap Add by Snapcode. Next, tap the snapcode of the person on your camera roll. Finally, tap Add Friend. Another cool feature of snapcodes is that you can simply open Snapchat, point your camera at your friend's snapcode, and tap and hold the snapcode. This will automatically add that person. #2: Post Your Snaplink on Your Social Channels Leveraging other social platforms is another great way to increase your Snapchat following. You can share your username and snapcode like in step 1; however, the easiest way for someone to add you on Snapchat is online with your snaplink. Similar to unique snapcodes, everyone has an individual snaplink. You can share your personal snaplink on other social platforms, and even in your emails to your audience. To create your personal snaplink, simply type snapchat.com/add/ and then your username (for example, snapchat.com/add/johnleedumas). Snaplinks are powerful, because you can simply tap on someone's snaplink on your smartphone, and the Snapchat app will automatically open and add that person. No other steps are required and there's no username to memorize. #3: Engage With Users on GhostCodes GhostCodes can help you grow your Snapchat following even faster. The app makes it easy for people with similar interests to find one another without requiring a previous connection outside of Snapchat. Think of GhostCodes as a phonebook for Snapchat. You create a profile on the app and upload your snapcode so others can add you on Snapchat. You can also browse the app's directory to follow other Snapchat users based on categories that interest you. How's how to get started with GhostCodes. Set Up Your Profile First, download the GhostCodes app from the App Store or Google Play. Then open the app and create your account. Fill in your personal information, including your Snapchat username and a brief bio. Next, you're prompted to add your snapcode. To do this, open Snapchat and tap on the little ghost icon to see your snapcode. Then take a screenshot of it. (On iOS, press and hold the Home and power buttons simultaneously. On Android, press and hold the Home and volume-down buttons simultaneously.) Next, go back to GhostCodes and tap the ghost on your screen. The screenshot you just took will appear and you've now added your snapcode! Finally, add your interests (this will help other like-minded people find you). Select a category that best fits the type of content you create on Snapchat. You can only pick one category, but you can change it later if needed. For example, select Inspirational as your category, so other users searching the Inspirational category can find you. Use the App After setting up your account,

How to Build a Periscope Audience for Your Business

How to Build a Periscope Audience for Your Business

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you marketing on Periscope? Want to reach more people? You can develop a following on Periscope by promoting your broadcasts, engaging with viewers and repurposing your content on other channels. In this article you'll discover how to build a Periscope audience for your business. #1: Cross-Promote Broadcasts While content is ultimately king, think about how you can attract enough of an audience to Periscope to drive results. Listen to this article: If you've already established and nurtured followers on other social channels, especially Twitter, you likely have a strong foundation to begin distributing your Periscope content and generating interest. Think about your branding guidelines for the social channels that you plan to use in your promotion strategy. Even though you're promoting Periscope content, make sure that you optimize your promotions to match the tone and format of the different channels. By aligning your promotion to each network, you increase the likelihood of earning social shares, receiving feedback and gathering an audience. Consider the following distribution tactics when planning your Periscope promotions. Twitter When promoting your live stream on Twitter, craft a brief yet compelling tweet equipped with hashtags and an attractive visual, which are some Twitter best practices. In the tweet below Michael Hyatt included hashtags to attract people interested in Periscope streams, as well as the followers of his #VirtualMentor brand. Hashtags on Twitter can make your Periscope event (or scope) more noticeable and easily searchable on the channel. Hyatt also used an informative and eye-catching visual to attract users' attention when they're scrolling through their Twitter feeds. Pinterest Pinterest is largely built on visually compelling, do-it-yourself and project-based content. Create informative content that incorporates images with a tall aspect ratio, detailed descriptions of your event and a call to action to your Periscope stream or landing page. Instagram When promoting your live stream on Instagram, consider adding a text overlay to your images. Content descriptions on this channel tend to be shorter (around 100 characters) and include multiple hashtags (try three to five). In this Instagram post, Sue B. Zimmerman promotes a scope with Kim Garst. Facebook Visual content typically does well on Facebook, particularly video. Create a brief video preview to attract attention and tag any guests participating in your Periscope stream to reach a broader audience. The LPGA promotes upcoming Periscope broadcasts on their Facebook page. This post previews an upcoming broadcast with golfer Morgan Pressel. Snapchat While Snapchat can be a tricky channel for promotions, start by creating a story to announce your Periscope stream. Since your followers won't be able to follow direct links to your content, ask them to take screenshots of your snaps that contain event details or publish snaps that reiterate the value of your Periscope stream to pique interest. LinkedIn Create a short LinkedIn Publisher article (between 500 and 800 words) to promote your Periscope efforts. Make sure to include an eye-catching visual and a call to action. You can share this content on your personal account or company profile, through LinkedIn groups or by direct messaging connections who are likely to be interested in your content. Hootsuite CEO Ryan Holmes promoted an upcoming AMA on Periscope in this LinkedIn article. Email List and Company Blog Okay, so your email list and blog aren't necessarily social channels. However, using your owned media channels to generate interest can be an excellent strategy for driving visitors to your Periscope content. Alert email subscribers to your upcoming broadcasts or write a blog post summarizing recent ones. Be sure to ask your followers for feedback and the type of content that they'd ...

How to Create Facebook Ads With Emails: 5 Creative Ideas

How to Create Facebook Ads With Emails: 5 Creative Ideas

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you have an email list? Are you looking for creative ways to use Facebook ads? With Facebook custom audiences, you can reach your email subscribers with relevant Facebook ads. In this article I'll share five ways to target your email subscribers with Facebook ads. Listen to this article: #1: Serve Ads to All Email Subscribers Since it requires no email list segmentation, the best way to get started is to target all your email subscribers. Simply upload your entire email list right into Facebook as a custom audience. The key is to create a unified message across different channels: email to Facebook to website. Target this audience if you're looking to reach your entire list to get the news out about a big event or a storewide sale, where the message is the same for everyone. Make sure your Facebook ad has a similar look and message or offer as your emails. Amazon uses this tactic to remind customers about their Deal of the Day. The idea is to share engaging content, so your email audience will help spread your message by interacting with your ads, acting as brand ambassadors. Since this audience is already familiar with your brand, analyze engagement metrics (likes, shares, comments) to measure the effectiveness of these ads. Their interaction validates how well the ad resonates with them, which results in a higher relevancy score, more social proof and free organic reach. #2: Target Ad Delivery by Opens and Unopens To employ these next few tactics, it's important you are able to segment your email subscriber list into audiences for remarketing. First, divide your email list into people who have opened your email and those who have not. Then, further segment the open list into those who did and did not take action. Target Subscribers Who Opened Your Email Create a Facebook ad that looks similar to the email you sent for those who only read your email. You want to get this audience to take action, so change up the messages with the ad. For instance, if the goal of the email was to get white paper downloads, then offer the same white paper in your Facebook ad, but write a message or ad copy that differs from your email. If you're an ecommerce store trying to get your customers to take advantage of a weekly 20%-off deal, show subscribers an ad that highlights the promotion and encourages them to take action. Sierra Trading Post created a Facebook offer with the same deal as their email. With this custom audience, exclude people who have already purchased or downloaded an offer. Target Subscribers Who Didn't Open Your Email For the subscribers who didn't even open your email, wait a few days and then target them with a Facebook ad. Since they haven't read the email, show them the same message. This helps your company stay in front of your audience. #3: Segment Subscribers by Purchase If you have an ecommerce website, a great way to increase the lifetime value of a customer is to cross-promote and/or upsell related products. Amazon does this brilliantly. The website is always showing their shoppers similar products, bundled products or other products previous customers bought. Their goal is to get people to buy more products that are relevant to what they are viewing. Utilize Facebook carousel ads to highlight multiple products that provide additional value for previous customers. Show products that fit with items they've already purchased. So if they bought dog treats, then show them dog food or dog toys. Look for creative ways to divide your audience for the purpose of upselling or cross-promoting other products they would find useful. Depending on your business goals, consider segmenting your customers by type of products, purchase amount, purchase date and frequency of purchases. Then target a carousel ad to each audience. #4: Reach Out to Disengaged Audiences Do you have a list of people who haven't opened your emails in quit...

Mobilizing Your Website: What You Need to Know

Mobilizing Your Website: What You Need to Know

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Is your website or blog mobile-ready? Are you wondering how to optimize it for mobile users? To learn about the opportunities available in the mobile marketing world, I interview Greg Hickman for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Greg Hickman, the founder of Mobile Mixed, a website that specializes in training marketers in mobile marketing. He also hosts The Mobile Mixed Podcast. Greg advises big brands on mobile marketing, including AT&T, Electronic Arts, Cabelas and Sony Pictures. Greg shares what businesses should do to make their mobile experience more user-friendly. You'll learn about the best tools available to build your own mobile site and how to discover the kind of devices people are using to visit your site. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Mobilizing Your Website Why it's important for businesses to think about the unique needs of mobile users Greg shares why you have to think where your customer or audience is coming from. The way we consume content today—whether it be email, social, using search or listening to podcasts—is mainly through a mobile device. The first entry point to you, your business or brand is more likely to be a mobile phone. You want the customers' experience to be very friendly and optimized to whatever device they are on. Around 53% of the US population has a smartphone. You'll discover why Greg believes email is overlooked when it comes to mobile. Listen to the show to find out why Greg believes mobile email is an opportunity for marketers. How to find out if mobile users are coming to your website Greg recommends that the first thing you should do is look at analysis software such as Google Analytics. It will show you how many people in your current audience are coming to your site from a mobile device. It will also break out the numbers by specific device. You'll probably discover that 20-50% of the overall visits to your site are coming from a mobile device. Secondly, depending on your email service provider, some will offer insights into how many of the email opens are coming from mobile. You'll find out why this is a good indicator if you're a big emailer. Greg shares how you can look to see from a social perspective if people engage with you from a mobile device on Twitter or Facebook. You'll hear how many people visited Social Media Examiner over the last 30 days via a mobile device. Listen to the show to find out why MillerCoors launched Android-specific solutions for their audience. Why we need to think differently about tablet users versus mobile phone users There's a lot of misconception about how people use their smartphones. Greg recently read a study where 68% of smartphone usage is from home. Mobile doesn't necessarily mean on the go. You have to look at your own customers and brand and see where they are interacting with you to help determine how much it's going to affect you. Greg believes with the tablet experience, you will start to see more usage in the evening hours. People use them as a second screen experience while sitting on the couch in front of the TV. Google Analytics helps you see the time of day people are hitting your site with their specific devices. You might then correlate that to the likelihood of people sitting on the couch. Listen to the show to find out how the older generation is adopting tablet devices. Where marketers should start when it comes to making a site ...

The Writer’s Guide To Semantic Search

by David Rosam @ Writing For SEO

Now that Google is making fundamental changes to its algorithm and looking at content semantically, you have real opportunities to make your copy more effective. In my last piece, I talked about why you need to do more than just write for your audience to make your site successful. This piece looks at how you […]

How the Facebook News Feed Works: Changes Marketers Need to Know

How the Facebook News Feed Works: Changes Marketers Need to Know

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you struggling to remain visible in Facebook's news feed? Wondering how Facebook decides what to show in the news feed? In this article you'll discover how the Facebook news feed algorithm works, what's been updated, and how marketers can respond to create more visibility on Facebook. Listen to this article: #1: Facebook Prioritizes Content Topics in the News Feed Based on the Time a User Spends on Similar Content Previously, Facebook said it wouldn't give higher organic reach to instant articles in the news feed. However, that didn't mean instant articles would not be part of its algorithm to determine what posts should get more organic reach in the news feed. According to Facebook's first post on the change, Facebook will now use time spent reading or watching content as a signal that a particular story was important to the user. Content includes video, instant articles, and articles loaded in the mobile browser from the Facebook app. The time spent viewing signal will be used to predict what other content users might find interesting, and will show users similar content in their news feed. Here's how you can use time spent viewing to your advantage: If you want more people to see your content in the news feed, make sure that people stick around long enough to consume your content. Whether it's video, instant articles, or content that people load in the mobile browser from the Facebook app, the key is to create content that keeps people engaged. You can do this a couple of different ways. For starters, be sure that your content delivers what the headline promises. You need to craft a headline that's irresistible enough to click, and include a video or article introduction to show you'll deliver on that headline. You can create longer videos and articles; however, not too long. Facebook looks at the time spent on a piece of content within a maximum threshold. The goal is to make sure that people don't click through to your content and immediately click away from it. #2: Facebook Plans to Add Diversity to News Feed Sources While researching its Feed Quality program, Facebook learned that users want to see wide-ranging content from different publishers, as opposed to back-to-back articles from the same source. Hence, Facebook will reduce how often users see several posts in a row from the same source in their news feed. Here's how you can use diversity to your advantage: This is a tricky one, especially for content publishers that publish 5+ posts per day. Authors who write on a variety of publications are the real winners. Essentially, those authors could end up being seen in the news feed multiple times per day because their content would come from different sources. Businesses using quality guest blogging as a tactic for gaining exposure in their industry should consider spreading content to multiple sites for better organic exposure in the Facebook news feed. Another way to be more diverse and still appear multiple times in the news feed is to repurpose content. Effectively, you could share multiple pieces of content per day from different sources (your blog, your Medium blog, Facebook notes, your LinkedIn Publisher blog, etc.), along with different Facebook accounts (your page, employee profiles with public followers, your groups, etc.). #3: Facebook Wants to Connect Users With the Stories That Matter Most to Them Facebook's second post about the news feed algorithm updates was a video from the F8 conference about how the news feed works with Adam Mosseri, VP of product management for news feed. He states that Facebook's mission is to connect users with the stories that matter most to them. Here's how you can use Facebook's news feed mission to your advantage: Ultimately, Facebook's news feed mission should also be your mission each time you create content, whether it's on Facebook, your blog, or any other social network.

Gmail Tabs: A Game Plan for Marketers

Gmail Tabs: A Game Plan for Marketers

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Does your business rely on email? Are you wondering how Gmail tabs will impact your marketing? If email is a part of your business, you’ll want to pay close attention. In this article I’ll provide a simple 5-step plan that any marketer can use in response to Gmail tabs. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, you'll learn what the new Gmail tabs mean for your business. You'll also pick up some tips on what you can do and I'll talk about my concerns for the future. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Why should marketers pay attention? Chances are that email plays some role in your marketing. Maybe you email your subscribers when you have a new blog post or newsletter. Perhaps you have some sort of online form (for lead generation or just a simple contact form). Email indeed plays an important role for most businesses. Gmail is auto-filtering all emails for all users. This means your marketing newsletters and emails will get stuck in a slightly hidden folder, no matter what you do. In that very same folder, Gmail is posting unsolicited ads that look like emails. The bottom line with regards to these new Gmail tabs is that you will likely see a drop in your email marketing effectiveness unless you take action. In 2012, there were 425 million Gmail users. That's a huge number! Social Media Examiner has 75,000+ Gmail users. Yes, 34% of our readers subscribe through a Gmail account! There's a pretty good likelihood you have more Gmail users than you realize. What are Gmail tabs? Gmail is rolling out tabs that organize your mail. There are three default tabs: Primary, Social and Promotions (shown below). If you haven't already received this update on Gmail, it will likely come soon. Your emails are likely going into the Promotions tab. Tabs default "on" for all Gmail users unless your subscribers change this setting. If your subscribers don't know how to change it, this is how they will be finding your emails. At the time of this post, not all subscribers have tabs, but it is rolling out very quickly. What are the marketing implications? Gmail is becoming like Facebook. If you use it, you use it by their rules. I'm also concerned by the possibility that other email providers may follow Google's lead. This may be the beginning of the end of email as the one platform you can at least get delivery into. With social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, you can never be sure that your messages get in front of your audience. Email has always been the one way that you could be certain of getting in front of your audience, assuming subscribers gave you permission to send them emails. Will this change with Gmail tabs? I think so. The updates in the Promotions tab reset each time you visit Gmail, meaning it is very easy for a Gmail user to never realize there is mail waiting in the Promotions tab. Other email providers may follow suit. There could come a time when marketers will have to pay to play. Your 5-step plan for dealing with Gmail tabs Here are tips you can move on right now to help educate your Gmail readers. These are all proactive steps we have taken at Social Media Examiner. 1. Make a video educating your Gmail users. First, educate your subscribers by making a video like the one below I made for our audience. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Elz_1KQnmA In this video, you'll learn how your readers can make sure your emails show up in their Primary box.

Meerkat and Periscope: How Businesses Are Using Live Mobile Broadcasting

Meerkat and Periscope: How Businesses Are Using Live Mobile Broadcasting

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Are you interested in live mobile broadcasting? Have you tried Meerkat or Periscope? To learn about mobile broadcasting apps, I interview Brian Fanzo. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Brian Fanzo, partner and chief digital strategist at Broadsuite, a company that helps businesses succeed with social and mobile marketing. Brian is one of the leading authorities on Meerkat and Periscope. In this episode Brian Fanzo will explore the live mobile broadcasting apps Meerkat and Periscope and what they mean for your business. You'll discover the pros and cons of each platform, as well as how to get started. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. How to subscribe/review on iPhone. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Meerkat and Periscope How Brian got started with mobile broadcasting Brian, who calls himself a change evangelist, has a technology background and a love of social media. He is always looking for ways people can leverage technology to be more productive and tell their story in unique ways. Brian likes to jump on every new app: it’ll either fail fast, and he’ll uninstall it or he'll run with it! Mobile broadcasting definitely falls into the later category. Brian shares how he was introduced to Meerkat. He was speaking at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, when he got a message from someone who worked at Twitter, telling him that Ashton Kutcher and Gary Vaynerchuck were on a new video app. About 35 seconds later, Brian had downloaded it and clicked the start button. Meerkat came out February 26, 2015, and Brian was on it March 2. Brian took to Meerkat immediately. He put his mobile device on his tripod, hit the stream button, put in the event hashtag and was live. He treated it like he does his regular YouTube videos: walking around, describing the event and sharing it with his audience. About three minutes in, someone commented, “I see the Samsung booth, can you turn to your right.” That’s when Brian realized he didn’t just bring the experience to his audience, he was letting his viewers be a part of it. People in the United States could dictate what they saw in Spain. "It felt interactive, like having a true conversation," he recalls. Since Brian was about to go to South by Southwest,  he put some strategy behind his Meerkating. Brian contacted a couple of brands that were holding different events, and asked for backstory, so he could be prepared to cover them. During SXSW, Brian did a Meerkat of all the sessions he went to, as well as a preview each morning and recap every evening. About 300-800 people watched each stream, no matter what he was talking about. Periscope was released into the Apple store during Social Media Marketing World (the last week of March 2015), and Brian recalls using Periscope for first time during the opening keynote. Listen to the show to hear where Brian was when he heard about Periscope at Social Media Marketing World. How live streaming apps work "Live streaming isn’t anything new," Brian explains. "It’s really just turning on a video and opening the portal to anyone who wants to use it." What's new is the fact that we’re able to download an app, sign in with a Twitter account or phone number, click stream and post the link. Then anybody in your Twitter community can click on that link and watch whatever you’re showing on your phone. The big piece is the mobile aspect. It’s as simple as a basic tweet and hitting the “stream” button. Listen to the show to learn how and where to watch a Meerkat or Periscope live stream. Businesses uses for live broadcasting

Blogging: A Business Model for Growth

Blogging: A Business Model for Growth

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you blog for business? Are you wondering how the blogging can help your business? To learn how a blog can be the center of your entire marketing program and explode your business's growth, I interview Joe Pulizzi for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Joe Pulizzi, founder of the Content Marketing Institute and co-author of Get Content, Get Customers and Managing Content Marketing. Joe shares his blogging story and how sharing free content grew his business. You'll learn how blogs can grow your email list, why multi-author blogs may be worth exploration and how to widen your professional network. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Content Marketing What is content marketing? Joe tells us that people think content marketing is a buzzword. He says that 2013 is the year for content marketing to become part of the vernacular used by more marketing folks and business owners. It's important to realize that content marketing has been around for a long time. Joe looks at the example of John Deere creating The Furrow magazine back in the late 1800s. The company published the magazine because they wanted to create a true resource and educational component for farmers to be more successful business owners. The only way to do that back then was to have a magazine. They didn't have blogs, webinars or in-person events. It's the first representation of what is now content marketing. Joe explains that today, we're all basically media companies and publishers. It's really the essence of what content marketing is and because there are no technology barriers; everybody is doing it. The idea is that companies create or curate valuable, compelling and relevant content on a consistent basis. Usually it's to maintain or change behavior, and attract or retain a customer. If you're a traditional media company, you create content to get revenue in one of two ways: 1) getting your content sponsored in some way and 2) selling your content. This is how a traditional publisher goes to market. That's the business model. However, if you're a small business, you're creating content because you ultimately want to sell something. You're not necessarily making money directly from the content, but sales are coming in a later form or you're growing relationships with people who are then more likely to buy from you at a later date. Listen to the show to find out why the barriers to entry are very low and why consumers are more accepting of content in different forms than they have ever been. Joe's blogging story Joe describes the term blog as being a very important tool. He started out in the content marketing industry in 2000, with a company called Penton Media. Penton still is the largest independent business publisher in North America. They publish magazines mainly in industries like heating and air conditioning,  major manufacturing or food service. Joe ran the custom content division for all of these properties, which meant that if someone didn't want to advertise in a magazine, the publisher sent them over to Joe. It was his job to find a different way to make money from these people because he couldn't sell them ads. Joe tried to figure out how to help these companies tell better stories: "How were companies going to get attention if they didn't have a compelling story to tell?" Joe shares examples of the market share of the most popular television shows.

Content Marketing: How Businesses Can Grow With Content

Content Marketing: How Businesses Can Grow With Content

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you have a content marketing strategy for your business? Would you like to discover how to create and distribute content that will drive sales for your company? To learn how to grow your business with content marketing, native advertising and more, I interview Robert Rose. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Robert Rose, the co-author of the book, Managing Content Marketing: The Real-World Guide for Creating Passionate Subscribers to Your Brand. He's the chief strategist at the Content Marketing Institute. He's also the co-host of the podcast, This Old Marketing. Robert explores content marketing, native advertising and what all of it means for your business. You'll discover how to develop a content marketing strategy that grows your business, take advantage of the marketing opportunities offered through native advertising and learn new ways to distribute your content to the right influencers. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Content Marketing What is content marketing?  The Content Marketing Institute views content marketing as the approach businesses use to create, curate, distribute and promote the types of content their customers will find valuable. The goal of content marketing is to drive sales and move your business forward. Done well, content marketing offers a value that's separate and discrete from the products or services you sell. It's about providing content-driven experiences that are educational, entertaining or useful to your audience, but ultimately drive engagement, awareness and sales for your brand. Social media gives you the power to aggregate your own audiences and be your own media company. The tools needed to publish the type of content that establishes you as a thought leader in your industry and draws customers to your brand are readily available and easy to use. Listen to the show to discover how content marketing can go beyond written articles and encompass things like videos, app development, games and more. Examples of businesses that do content marketing well You'll hear Robert explore how big companies like Chipotle Mexican Grill, LEGO and Coca-Cola leverage content marketing in creative and innovative ways such as movies, TV series and magazines. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DBhTiyQU1kA Compared to what large companies might spend on traditional mass media or big sponsorships, their content marketing expenditures are just a drop in the bucket, according to Robert—yet it has such a big impact from a branding standpoint. Even if your small business doesn't have the budget for national TV spots and large print campaigns, you can get a lot of bang for your buck through content marketing. It's easy and inexpensive to publish, distribute and promote your own content through blogging, social media and podcasting. Robert uses Marcus Sheridan's business blog to illustrate this point. He used his site to answer every question asked about pools and became an expert in the very small niche he was already passionate about. This propelled his business, River Pools and Spas, to huge success and top Google rankings. Listen to the show to find out how the Content Marketing Institute leverages its blog, workshops, classes and podcast to drive attendance to their annual show, Content Marketing World.  Research on the effectiveness of content marketing Content Marketing Institute and MarketingProfs recently released two new studies: B2B Content Marketing 2015: Benchmarks, Budgets, and Trends — North America and B2C Content Marketing 2015: Be...

Selling With Social Media: A New Direction for Businesses

Selling With Social Media: A New Direction for Businesses

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use social media to grow your business? Are you wondering how social media can help you sell more products and services? To learn about why you need to rethink the sales process in this social age, I interview Tom Martin for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Tom Martin, author of The Invisible Sale: How to Build a Digitally Powered Marketing and Sales System to Better Prospect, Qualify and Close Leads. His agency is Converse Digital. Tom shares the concept of painless prospecting and propinquity. You'll learn how to succeed in the changing social media sales landscape, and how your business can embrace these new strategies. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Selling With Social Media How the online world has changed the way businesses sell Tom believes it's more about how buyers buy than the way businesses sell. With the Internet, people can hide behind the anonymity of Google search. You can do all your pre-purchase research without having to talk to a salesperson. You only have to talk to a person once you've made a short list of companies you are interested in and want to close the deal. Today's buyer prefers this process, as it's easier and more efficient. With this in mind, companies have to adjust. In the early days, the power was with the salesperson, but with the knowledge available online today, the power is in the hands of the consumer. Tom says as a business, you have to stop thinking about how you sell because you don't really sell anymore. Instead you help buyers make a buying decision. When they make their decision, hopefully it will be in your favor. Although it won't always be the case. You'll discover how your system needs to be set up properly and the approach you need to consider. If you have a really good product or service, more often than not, you will win the conversion. Most people are turned off by people selling to them. The best way is to show them that you're willing to help and that you always have their best interests at heart. Listen to the show to find out more about how the approach to sales has changed. An example of a business that has embraced new ways to sell Tom talks about a camera store called Adorama based in New York that he used as a case study in his book, The Invisible Sale. Adorama only has one store, but does business in all 50 US states and 5 countries. Adorama has two sides to their business, B2C and B2B. Regardless of which side you look at, they approach it the same way. Their philosophy is to sell by sharing original educational content. Even though it's a photography store, they sell more than just cameras. They've built a Learning Center that includes Adorama TV, which is one of their huge content pieces. The Learning Center is a treasure trove of educational content. Although their approach is to educate, when you watch one of their videos, you'll notice easy-to-follow links to products below the video. You'll find out how they used YouTube to allow people to reach that product. In 2010, they saw a general growth curve, mainly due to the educational content they provide. The moral of the lesson is that if you can make your buyer smarter and better because they are doing business with you, then Tom believes you will succeed in selling more to that buyer. Listen to the show to hear why Tom relates it to fly-fishing and how it's the same with modern content marketing.

Snapchat or Instagram? Deciding Which Platform Is Ideal for Your Visual Content

Snapchat or Instagram? Deciding Which Platform Is Ideal for Your Visual Content

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Is visual content part of your social media marketing? Are you trying to decide whether to use Instagram or Snapchat? Snapchat and Instagram share the same basic purpose. While many businesses want to know which is better for marketing, the truth is both have value. In this article you'll find insights to help you decide whether your visual content campaigns should be on Snapchat or Instagram. Snapchat and Instagram Stats Instagram and Snapchat have more similarities than just being photo sharing platforms. They also have some commonality in how they both appeal to younger age groups, are mobile-driven and have large portions of their audience use the apps daily. Listen to this article: When determining which platform to use for your next campaign (or even in general), learn the important metrics for each to make an informed decision. Snapchat Metrics Snapchat launched in 2011, though it's only recently that businesses and brands started to use it as a marketing tool. Snapchat has 100 million daily active users, and there are 400 million snaps per day. More than 60% of Snapchat users in the United States are 13 to 34 years old, and 37% are between 18 and 24 years old. The platform is particularly popular among college students; 77% of them use it daily. Engagement on Snapchat, if any, is private. Snapchat's images (which do not have to be high-quality) are only temporary, and only 2% of marketers are currently using Snapchat.   Instagram Metrics Instagram was launched in 2010, and quickly picked up steam, especially since Facebook purchased Instagram as their new sister company. Instagram has more than 400 million monthly users, and there are more than 80 million photos posted daily. The platform also skews young: 53% of Instagram users are 18 to 29 years old; 25% are 30 to 49 years old, and 11% are 50 to 64 years old. Engagement on Instagram is public, and comes in the form of hearts, comments and shares. Instagram now offers ads, partnered with Facebook Ads. Instagram heavily utilizes hashtags, has a wide international reach and incredible click-through rates. Instagram allows cross-posting to Facebook, Flickr and Twitter. #1: Snapchat Marketing Snapchat allows users to either send snaps (photos and videos) to specific individuals or share them with all contacts through "stories." These images and videos aren't professional; they're "snapped" with a phone's camera. You can edit snaps with the platform's basic features, which include the ability to add text. When you share a snap individually, it disappears quickly; an image lasts 10 seconds and a video only for its duration. Since only 1% of businesses currently use Snapchat as a marketing tool, there's a lot of room for businesses to grab hold of their audience without worrying about the looming competition. If you aim to target college students, Snapchat can be incredibly valuable. With Snapchat, it's all about the timing. Businesses that have done well on Snapchat understand how to harness good timing and urgency in promotions. Businesses Using Snapchat Taco Bell, GrubHub and 16 Handles are examples of businesses and brands that have done well on Snapchat. Taco Bell, which knows their target audience well, followed users to Snapchat. They successfully take advantage of the timely feel of Snapchat: snaps and stories are temporary and the audience doesn't linger. Taco Bell has been known to send out stories late at night, when nothing else is open and college students have the munchies. Considering there's a Taco Bell on or close to most college campuses, and almost no one sleeps normal hours at major universities, this is near genius. It has brought them success. GrubHub also takes advantage of the urgency of Snapchat. They'll send out coupon codes, updates and deals, which are sometimes hinted about on Twitter, but require Snapchat to obtain. The codes are temporary,

Blog Comments: Should Your Blog Shut Down Comments?

Blog Comments: Should Your Blog Shut Down Comments?

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you like to get comments on your blog? Have you ever wondered if you should allow comments or shut them down? To learn about why blog comments are valuable to your business, I interview Mark Schaefer and Tim McDonald for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Mark Schaefer, who is a college educator and author of four books. His blog is called Grow and his latest book is Social Media Explained. Tim McDonald is the director of community at the Huffington Post, founder of My Community Manager and a member of the No Kid Hungry Social Council. Mark and Tim share what comments mean to their blogs, and some of the challenges they face with moderation. You'll discover the upside of blog comments, how you can use them to improve your business and moderation tactics for different-sized blogs. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Blog Comments A long time ago, Seth Godin shocked the industry when he decided to shut down comments on his blog. He didn't really care for comments—for him it was more about generating daily content. More recently, Brian Clark and his team at Copyblogger decided to shut down their blog comments. As a result of this, there has been a lot of interesting dialogue in this space. The upside of blog comments Mark explains how there are a lot of different business reasons behind blogs, and it's up to each individual business to make the decision whether to have comments on their blog. He says that there are probably some very good economic reasons why Copyblogger decided to remove comments, but Mark thinks that blog comments are the economic engine. The community that Mark has built on his blog has led to many different business benefits for him and his community. You can get to know people in the comment area, which can lead to collaborations, customers and suppliers. Mark feels that a lot of influence takes place in the blog communities, where you can develop strong relationships compared to the ones you make on Twitter or Facebook. You'll hear other great benefits that come from comments on your blog, and why Mark sees them as a gift every day. The Huffington Post has a little bit of a different viewpoint, just because of their sheer size. They face a bigger challenge because of the number of comments they get every day. It's hard for them to actually interact and engage with every single commenter. Tim explains at this point, it's a matter of them looking at some of the prolific commenters on their site and working with them. They've found that some commenters don't want to write for them, they are happy just commenting. Listen to the show to find out the cost of engagement, and why you can engage yourself broke. Some of the challenges the Huffington Post faces with blog comments Tim says that the biggest issue for them is to figure out how to allow people to share and express their thoughts on content, while appreciating that the standard for commenting is different from their editorial standards. They have to find ways to moderate this effectively with the different languages, countries and time zones. You can't replace a human when it comes comment moderation. You need to find a balance between using technology, combined with what people can do. You'll hear how the Huffington Post deals with heated dialogue and negative comments on their blogs. When it comes to dealing with spam, last year they made all commenters authenticate ...

5 Instagram Changes: What Marketers Need to Know

5 Instagram Changes: What Marketers Need to Know

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you up to date with the latest Instagram changes? Want to know what the changes mean for marketers? In addition to a brand-new logo, Instagram has rolled out updates to its ad products, video features, and news feed algorithm. In this article, you'll discover how the most recent Instagram changes can affect your marketing. Listen to this article: #1: Video Length Increased Ready to share longer videos on Instagram? In case you haven't heard, Instagram rolled out an increased time limit for videos from 15 to 60 seconds in April. Most users should have this capability with the latest version of the app. You can shoot video directly from the Instagram app or use your photo library. Features allow you to add filters, turn off the sound, and choose the cover photo. With these changes, you can share more video content, especially if you like to repurpose content from other networks, such as downloading your Snapchat story video to Instagram. #2: Videos Show Views and Viewers Now you can find out how many people are viewing your videos on Instagram. Simply look at the view count below each of your videos. When you click on your number of views, you'll get to see the number of likes, along with the option to follow those who liked your video. This may give you an idea of the amount of reach you're getting versus engagement. So if you see that hundreds of people viewed a video, but only a handful liked it, you can assume that it didn't resonate well with your audience. If you have hundreds of views and hundreds of likes, however, you have a winning video. #3: A Tap on Photo Ads Reveals the Call to Action When someone taps once on your ad photo, it brings up your call to action. You can let users click through to your website or app, depending on what you configured when setting up your Instagram ad. Note that this isn't the case with ad videos on Instagram. If you do a single tap on an ad video, it will turn on the sound. A second single tap will turn off the sound. Do a double tap to like the video, just as doing a double tap on an ad image will like the image. This is something worth noting when choosing between image and video. #4: Profile Click-throughs From Ads Include the Call to Action If you link your Instagram profile to your Instagram ad, when someone taps on your Instagram profile, it will place your ad's call to action at the top of your profile. Note that this only happens if users go to your profile by tapping on it above your ad. If they were to access it anywhere else, the call to action would no longer be there. Linking is something to keep in mind when choosing your call-to-action button text. When someone taps through to your Instagram profile from your ad, you'll want to display a call to action and profile bio text that align with your campaign. Would you want Apply Now, Book Now, Contact Us, Donate Now, Download, Learn More, Shop Now, Sign Up, or Watch More at the top of your profile? And what bio text and link would you want below that? Keep this in mind for every Instagram ad campaign. #5: News Feed Visibility Shifts With Algorithm While most people are focused on the logo change, the biggest change is the rollout of the enhanced Instagram algorithm. If you take a close look at your own Instagram news feed, you may notice that it's no longer in chronological order of newest posts first. Instead, you'll see posts in the order that Instagram deems the most important to you. It's not overall engagement or recency that wins the news feed, but rather how much Instagram thinks you care about that particular Instagram user. For example, a photo with 9 likes and no comments from three hours ago from someone you occasionally engage with is several posts ahead of a photo with 180k likes and 640 comments from an hour ago from a celebrity with a verified profile whom you rarely engage with. As an individual,

6 Google+ Features to Promote Your Business

6 Google+ Features to Promote Your Business

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you use Google+ for your business? Wondering which features to invest your time and effort in? While there have been recent changes to Google+, the platform has a number of features many marketers love and will continue to use. In this article you'll discover six Google+ features you can use to promote your business. Listen to this article: #1: Set Up Google+ Business Listings for Visibility Google My Business is by far the most important Google+ feature, especially if your business has a local presence. Not only can a Google+ business listing increase your visibility on local and mobile search, but it also allows potential customers to call you, get directions to your business on Google Maps and check out your verified business website. Your listing also makes your photos and YouTube videos easily findable on your business page and lets customers leave reviews for your business right on your Google+ page. It's up to you to fill in your business information with as much detail as possible. Check out this business listing for a restaurant in Pune, India. As a result of verifying their website, it now ranks #1 in the organic search results for the business name. The listing clearly shows all of the restaurant's information, including their location on Google Maps and customer reviews. As mobile search grows in importance, having a Google+ business listing will become even more vital from a local SEO point of view. If your business is a retail store, restaurant, café or hotel, your Google+ business listing will be a crucial part of your online presence in the years to come. #2: Use Circles to Segment Connections Google+ Circles are an effective way to create subsets of people you're connected to and share content and updates selectively with them. You can create circles based on friends, customers, business partners, affiliates or influencers you follow. This helps you segment your updates to particular audiences and their interests. Some people even use circles to send updates to large groups to avoid the restrictions that come with Gmail. #3: Create and Join Communities to Network Google+ Communities enable you to organize groups of people around a topic of conversation or a cause. According to Google+ evangelist Guy Kawasaki, "Communities have transformed Google+ into a more deeply connected environment, people's favorite communities have become a starting point for their Google+ activity each day. Whether you're representing a brand or are an individual with a passion, communities are a way to connect with like-minded people." You can use communities to recruit and connect with passionate advocates of your products or your cause. Or you could create a community around a passion or topic of interest, like a football club or a movie franchise. It's no surprise that the Star Wars community is one of the most popular, with more than 4 million followers. You can also join other people's communities to network with like-minded people. Peg Fitzpatrick's advice is that you don't just replicate your Facebook or LinkedIn community on Google+. Make your Google+ community unique so that it provides real value to its members. One way to do this is to organize hangouts on air exclusively for your community members. #4: Start Collections to Categorize Content Google+ Collections are a unique way to group your posts by topic. This feature allows you to categorize the content you share on Google+. Lately Google seems to have been adding features to make it easier to add posts to a collection, and they seem to be expending some effort on adding other bells and whistles. According to Google, "Posts in collections you follow will appear in your Home stream, with a link to easily jump right into the collection so you can get to similar content from that author." Ever since I started creating collections, I've noticed that Google+ users have been finding and following them...

6 Tips to Get Your Business Started on Social Media

6 Tips to Get Your Business Started on Social Media

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want to create a business presence on social media? Looking for tips to get started? Setting up a good foundation on social media can help you build visibility and connections for your business. In this article you'll discover six tips to get your business started on social media. Listen to this article: #1: Create Profiles on Multiple Social Platforms Social media-friendly businesses don't simply create a Facebook page or Twitter account and leave it at that. They target multiple platforms, including LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest and perhaps even Tumblr, too. From the outside, it may seem unnecessary to have an account on each of these channels, but from an SEO perspective, it absolutely is. When potential clients do a Google search for your business name, you want them to see a full list of your social media profiles in addition to your website. Chances are they'll click through to read your reviews, see how many followers you have and maybe (hopefully) even ask a question. KnowEm is a quick, easy way to find out if your business name is available on specific social networks. Enter your business name in the search box, and the tool will search for your name across different platforms. There's also a special category for business networks. #2: Fill Out Your Profiles Completely It's important to fill out your social profiles completely. Incomplete or inactive social media business profiles give visitors little reason to like or follow your business. And inactivity is likely to have the same effect. You'd be surprised how many social profiles are incomplete or inactive for months on end. When filling out your social profiles, keep these questions in mind: What will people gain by following you? Remember that people are busy, so you need to give them a reason to follow you. Do your profile summaries and descriptions include the who, what, where and why of your business? Also, make sure that your contact information is clearly visible. #3: Allow Blog Comments Commenting systems such as Facebook Comments, Livefyre and Disqus make it easy for people to interact with your content through social media. Each system has its advantages. Livefyre is ideal if you want to encourage discussion. It's used by popular websites like Hootsuite, CNET and New York Magazine. Disqus gives you strong moderation features, requiring users to create an account prior to posting comments. It's a great choice for business bloggers. Facebook Comments is the best choice if you get most of your engagement through Facebook, and it allows for direct Facebook shares. #4: Add Share Buttons to Your Blog The easier you make it for visitors to share your content, the more likely it that they'll share your content. That's why it's important for blogs to have social media sharing buttons installed. Include share buttons on your blog posts, home page, landing pages and anywhere else that provides value to visitors. For articles or other high-value content, try placing share buttons at the top, bottom and side of the page. #5: Connect With Your Followers Don't forget that social media is all about being social. If you only post about your products and services in an attempt to generate sales, you'll likely hear crickets in return. Your message won't be heard on social media unless you're actively speaking with people. It's not necessary to reply to every comment of course, but at least try to stimulate engagement by responding to questions or providing further value when and where you can. This is called proactive engagement, and it should be an important part of your business's social media plan. Follow these key guidelines when interacting with customers through social media: Show some personality. Be lighthearted and humorous, but also serious when it really matters. People buy from people, so the more you show your brand's human side,

LinkedIn Ads: What Marketers Need to Know

LinkedIn Ads: What Marketers Need to Know

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you advertise on LinkedIn? Have you considered LinkedIn advertising and want to learn more? To discover everything there is to know about LinkedIn ads, I interview AJ Wilcox. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview AJ Wilcox, a LinkedIn ad expert. His agency, B2Linked, specializes in business-to-business advertising and lead generation on LinkedIn. In addition to managing accounts, AJ also specializes in LinkedIn ads training. AJ explores the different types of ads available on LinkedIn. You'll discover what B2B marketers need to know about advertising on LinkedIn. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How AJ Got Into LinkedIn Ads AJ is a long-time digital marketer who started out doing search engine optimization (SEO) and Google AdWords. About four years ago, a company in Utah recruited AJ. On his first day, he laid out his plans for SEO, pay per click, and social media to the CMO. She gave him the go-ahead and also informed him that the company had started a pilot program with LinkedIn ads. "See what you can do with it," she said. AJ replied, "absolutely," and then turned around and started laughing to himself. He felt like a veteran at digital marketing, yet had never heard of LinkedIn ads. He jumped into the platform to learn about it to try to keep the egg off his face. Within about two weeks, one of the salespeople approached AJ, telling him how much they loved the leads they'd been getting. When AJ discovered through Salesforce that the leads were all sourced from LinkedIn, he realized there was something to it. Listen to the show to hear how AJ started his business, B2Linked. Why Consider LinkedIn Ads? AJ explains that while Facebook's and LinkedIn's ad platforms are very different, they share the same principles. That means that if you have something nailed on Facebook, it will probably work well on LinkedIn and vice versa. While AJ doesn't run Facebook ads for his clients, when he's compared similar campaigns from Facebook to LinkedIn, he's found his conversion rate on LinkedIn to be about double that of Facebook. Plus, the sales teams have told him the LinkedIn leads are much higher quality than the ones from Facebook. LinkedIn is by far the best for B2B targeting, he continues. You can target by job title, seniority, company, skills, specific group membership, geography, and years in business; information people aren't putting on Facebook. AJ shares what he believes are the two best uses of LinkedIn ads. Number one is recruitment and the other is promoting B2B products and services such as an SaaS company (software as a service). Those businesses charge a substantial ongoing rate ($6,000 to $7,000 per month) for access to their software and have a lifetime value of more than $15,000. If you have a lifetime value of under $15,000, AJ cautions, make sure your funnel and your processes are really ironed out on Facebook first, because LinkedIn's cost per click (CPC) is much higher than Facebook's. Listen to the show to discover how to calculate lifetime value. The Ad Types When you go to LinkedIn.com/ads and start a self-service account, you'll have access to two different ad units. AJ explains the first type is text ads. These ads appear in the right sidebar of the LinkedIn homepage (on desktop) and you'll often see three ads there. According to AJ, text ads have a low click-through rate because most people are banner-blind to them. If four people click on them out of every 10,000 times they're viewed, you're doing great, he says.

Facebook Reactions: What Marketers Need to Know

Facebook Reactions: What Marketers Need to Know

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Have you seen the new Facebook reactions? Wondering how they'll affect your Facebook page? Facebook reactions let Facebook users go beyond liking a post by allowing them to choose from six emojis that show different emotions. In this article I'll explore how Facebook reactions work, and how your Facebook page can get the most from them. Listen to this article: Facebook Reactions for Fans The new Facebook reactions work pretty easily for users. When users hover over a post's Like button in the Facebook news feed, a personal profile timeline, or a Facebook page timeline, they will be able to choose from one of the new six Facebook reactions. Everyone can breathe a sigh of relief that Facebook reactions do not include a Dislike button. Hence, people cannot dislike your latest post (product, service, content, etc.). These reactions will simply allow expressions of like, love, laugh, wowed, saddened, or angered by your post. The feature will work similarly for mobile users, but users will hold down the Like button instead of hovering over it. Some mobile app users have noted that you must restart or update your app to get the new feature to work. Others have had to log out of their account and log back in again. Facebook Reactions for Pages From a Facebook page admin perspective, a few things will change. For starters, you'll see in your notifications that people are reacting to your posts instead of just liking them. On the posts themselves, you'll see an array of icons representing the different reactions that people have left on the post. On older posts, you'll see the new icon that represents likes, and on newer posts, you'll see all of the newer icons representing the different reactions that people have. People can also go back to older posts and add new reactions. You can click on the link to see the breakdown of which fans had specific reactions so you can see who likes, loves, and has other feelings about your post. Since page posts are public, it's important to understand that everyone can see the breakdowns of Facebook reactions, including people who are not admins and not even fans of the page. This means that you can go to other pages and see the breakdowns of reactions on their posts as well. This can be useful for competitor research as you can get a good feel for how people will react to specific types of content, status updates, and announcements – especially since you can get a quick summary of the reactions right at the top without having to scroll through the entire list. Note that only Facebook page admins will see the Liked / Invite buttons. If you are not a page admin, you only see Add Friend / Follow buttons next to people's names. So far, Facebook reactions only work on the Like button for the main posts themselves, but not on comments. So don't expect to react to comments anytime soon. In terms of your Facebook page's Insights, you can see the full breakdown of reactions for each of your posts by finding the post and clicking on it. There, you can see the full post details, including the new Facebook reactions counts. From an Insights perspective, Facebook reactions do not count as negative feedback. In other words, an angry reaction isn't categorized in the same area as a Hide Post, Report as Spam, Hide All Post, or Unlike Page. Hence, any reaction can be considered a good one. Now that you know how Facebook reactions work for your fans and for your page, here are some ways to get the most from them. #1: Encourage Fans to Use Reactions People love trying new things. Simply invite your fans to test out the new reactions on your page today. Not only will it teach your fans how to use this feature, but it will also boost your page's overall engagement and organic reach. For example, I initially planned to boost my post to test Facebook reactions, but I ended up canceling the promotion.

How to Win With Pinterest Contests

How to Win With Pinterest Contests

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Have you considered running a Pinterest contest? Looking for tools to help? Pinterest contests can increase your followers, boost engagement, and promote your brand and products. In this article, you'll discover how to easily host and manage a winning contest on Pinterest. Listen to this article: #1: Choose a Contest Management Tool Pinterest contests can be challenging to run, simply because they're hard to keep up with. Fortunately, Pinterest contest apps can make the process significantly easier. Some apps will even create landing pages to capture valuable lead information (like email addresses and phone numbers) that users otherwise wouldn't likely submit on a social media platform. If you're going to host a Pinterest contest, here are three apps you may want to try. Wishpond Wishpond has a user-friendly interface and features a lot of great tools for customizing your contest to fit your needs. Wishpond's contest app allows you to create "entry galleries" where other users can vote on their favorite pins or boards that have been entered into the contest. Users can do this by submitting their email addresses, providing an additional way to capture lead information. Other features allow you to choose customizable landing page templates, add a countdown to your landing page to increase urgency (and entries), and access analytics to see views, conversions, and conversion rates. You can also share entry forms on Facebook and Twitter. The landing page is designed to be both desktop- and mobile-friendly. You can preview the landing page and entry forms while creating them. The Wishpond contest app features the ability to have two different periods (or sections) of the contest: one period allows entries and another only allows voting on the entries. Wishpond offers a free trial, so you can see if the software is right for you. The basic plan, which includes social promotions, starts at $45 per month. PromoJam PromoJam's Pin-It-to-Win-It promotions app makes it easy to run a Pinterest contest. It can take as little as 10 minutes to get your contest up and running. With PromoJam's Pinterest contest app, you can create an SEO-optimized URL for your landing page. Choose from a variety of stunning and fully customizable landing page templates. This landing page converts into a confirmation page once users have submitted their entry. Other PromoJam features include the ability to share customized QR codes for your contest, view analytics and user entries as the contest progresses, add social plugin buttons (like a Facebook like option) to your campaign, and use a random winner selection tool. To use PromoJam's Pinterest contest app, you need to upgrade to the pro plan, which costs $249.99 a month, and allows you to collect up to 10,000 user submissions. Woobox Woobox is another amazing contest app that's used by brands like Fisher-Price, Crayola, and Shopify. Woobox's Pinterest contest features let you collect email addresses, allow unlimited entries or only one per user, create tabs for Facebook pages, create HTML entry forms, add an age restriction, and require users to follow you to enter (users must follow you on Pinterest for contest eligibility). Woobox has a free plan and trial, so you can get a feel for the interface before you purchase. To access all of the social promotion apps continually, including the Pin to Win app, you'll need to upgrade to a paid plan. The basic plan starts at $30 per month. #2: Pick a Contest Type At a first glance, it seems like the easiest way to host a Pinterest contest would be to ask users to repin a specific pin. That would be easy to track and easy for users to participate. However, it's not a valid option. You're not allowed to ask users to pin one specific pin. Here are some other options to consider. Require Pinners to Use a Specific Hashtag

4 Tools to Build a Social Media Content Calendar

4 Tools to Build a Social Media Content Calendar

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you struggle to keep track of your social media content? Are you looking for tools to help? Creating a social media content calendar doesn't need to be complicated or require a whole new platform. In this article you'll find four ways to build a social media content calendar with tools you may already use. Why Use a Social Media Calendar Individuals and businesses use social media for community engagement, content promotion, customer support, promoting the latest offers and more. Managing many moving parts involves multiple people, multiple strategies, and if not handled correctly, multiple problems. Listen to this article: When you keep all of your social media content plans in a central location, you let everyone know what everyone else is doing, they can see the latest changes and updates and can plan their own content accordingly. Use your calendar to track a variety of items, including publish date and time, post text, attached link, image or images, post type (image, link, text, etc.), campaign and post category or goal (engagement, content promotion, etc.). Once you've determined what to add to your calendar, it's time to create it. Here's how. #1: List It in Google Sheets Since Google Drive is a staple for many businesses, calendars managed in Google Sheets are familiar and accessible. It's easy for anyone comfortable with spreadsheets to use. Plus, when you implement such a familiar tool, you can dive right into planning. The collaboration features prevent confusion over outdated versions. Furthermore, the spreadsheet can be even more useful if your scheduling tool allows bulk uploading via CSV. To set up your calendar, either start with a "blank page" or search for social media calendar templates online. If you want, add a tab for each social network to keep everything separate. Even when you use a template, you still want to customize it a bit. Add all of the info your team needs to know, and leave out whatever they don't. For instance, if it's important to track who's responsible for each update, add a column for that. If most of your posts don't have links, delete that column. Keep in mind, not all information needs to be written out in the spreadsheet. Use color-coding, team member initials and other shortcuts to further organize the calendar. #2: Map It in Google Calendar Google Calendar, which a lot of people use already, has a slightly more rigid structure. However, nothing beats an actual calendar for keeping track of due dates and responsibilities. Keep all of your social content laid out in an actual calendar view. Those who prefer a list format are able to switch to agenda view. Create different calendars for each team member, client or social network to make it easy to segment your content. That way you'll get a calendar view of not just what's being posted, but who's responsible for it or what content category it falls under. Decide how you want to set up your calendar system (I color-code them either by network or content type), and create your multiple calendars. Then create an event for each post. Organize the details as you'd like. For example, use the location field to note who's writing which post. Then use the description for compiling additional details such as post link once it's published. #3: Visualize It in Trello Trello, which is organized by boards, lists and cards, is a tool a lot of people already use for brainstorming and collaboration. Like spreadsheets, Trello is flexible enough for anything. However, it looks and feels the opposite of a spreadsheet. If you're a visual person, or if you like organizing your content by progress stage, try Trello. When you first set up your Trello social media calendar, decide how to organize it. Make lists for different progress stages, social networks or marketing campaigns. Trello also has a calendar view for due dates, which makes it possible to build a plan with t...

Supercharge Search and Shopping with Similar Audiences

by Leland Reed @ Direct Online Marketing

 When Google released Retargeting Lists for Search Ads (RLSA) in 2014, it took time for marketers to discover just how powerful the tool is. In case you’re not familiar with RLSA, the ads work a lot like site retargeting: targeting users who have already interacted with your site in some manner, only with text ads […]

The post Supercharge Search and Shopping with Similar Audiences appeared first on Direct Online Marketing.

How to Get SEO, Call to Action and Conversion on the Same Page!

by Jeffrey_Smith @ SEO Design Solutions™ Blog

SEO is nice for popularity, but conversion is even better. So, before you go out and start snatching up more keywords than you can shake a stick at, make sure your offer is up to the challenge of enlivening customer attention and encouraging viewer retention. Otherwise, your marketing efforts will be a mere exercise in Read More

Facebook Marketing Plan: How to Grow Your Business With Facebook

Facebook Marketing Plan: How to Grow Your Business With Facebook

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you have a Facebook marketing plan? Are you wondering how to grow your business with Facebook? To learn about the important elements of a Facebook marketing plan, I interview Amy Porterfield for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Amy Porterfield, co-author of Facebook Marketing All-in-One for Dummies and host of the Online Marketing Made Easy podcast. She was also the very first Facebook community manager we ever had for Social Media Examiner. Amy shares what your Facebook marketing plan needs to succeed. You'll learn why you should create a Facebook business page and the best engagement techniques to grow your audience. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Marketing Plan The benefits of a Facebook business page  Amy states that although a lot of people get good engagement on their personal Facebook profile, she strongly recommends that you set up a Facebook business page. It's only on rare occasions that she advises to stick with your personal profile. If you have a physical or online product, program or service, a Facebook business page can be extremely beneficial. This type of page gives you permission to talk about your business on a regular basis. Once you have the foundation in place and become that go-to authority in your niche, you can talk about your business freely. It's the main reason why you need to have a business page, as well as a personal profile. You'll hear about another benefit when it comes to Facebook ads. Listen to the show to discover the reason why Amy has taken all communication over to her business page but still keeps her personal profile.   Start with a Facebook marketing plan Amy teaches how to put a Facebook marketing plan together in three phases. Attraction Promotion Sales Listen to the show to learn more about these three phases. 1. Attraction First of all, you need to build a Facebook community. It's important to grow a solid fan base so you can generate some great engagement with people. You become the go-to source in your community. In the attraction phase, you need to find different ways to grow your fan base. You need to know your audience. You'll hear why Amy advises creating a persona of your typical Facebook fan. One of the easiest ways to get the word out about your page is to have a Facebook Like button on your website. Once someone clicks the Like button to become a fan, they will remain on your website. You'll get quality fans with the Like button, because these people are already visiting your site. You want them to become Facebook fans, so you can stay top of mind when they're on Facebook. Listen to the show to hear what happened when Amy advised Michael Hyatt to install the Like button on his website. How to use your website or blog to grow a following Amy explains that it doesn't matter if you have a massive email subscriber list, these are people who have taken the time to give you their name and email address. You'll learn about techniques you can use to encourage people to become fans. If you want to attract new people, then Graph Search is very valuable. Amy says it's a hidden treasure that not many people use. You'll hear some great examples of search terms that will help you gain valuable information about your audience. When it comes to promotion, you need to turn your fans into leads. You definitely want to check out this previous podcast with Amy that goes into...

4 Free Tools to Analyze Your Social Media Competitors

4 Free Tools to Analyze Your Social Media Competitors

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want to improve your social media marketing? Have you looked at how your competitors are using social? There are tools to help you determine what's working for you and your competitors, what isn't working and why. In this article you'll discover four free tools to compare your social media presence with your competitors'. Listen to this article: #1: Do a Side-by-Side Comparison Fanpage Karma will analyze your and your competitors' accounts across Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. However, its most robust and useful features fall within the Facebook realm. The free plan offers a detailed, 90-day analysis for one page and a comparative dashboard for any number of competitors. The free plan will also send you weekly reports and alerts if you so choose. The free comparative analytics cover engagement, growth, most-used content sources and keywords, top posts, frequency, engagement by day and time, post type and supporters, among other metrics. The detailed analytics tack on keyword and content source engagement (via a color-coded word cloud), post length, success by post type, influencers, post history and more. You have to use the premium version to access analytics for other social networks, or for more robust analytics and exportable Excel and PowerPoint reports. These plans start at around $75 per month. The interface is unique in that it instantly displays comparative charts and graphs, allowing you to quickly and visually assess your page's strengths and weaknesses. Then dig deeper into the content types, timing and keyword tools to understand the why behind the data, and adjust your strategy accordingly. #2: Assess Facebook Page Performance LikeAlyzer will do a quick health check of any Facebook page. The tool is commonly used for competitive research because it doesn't require access to Facebook Insights to do its magic, and the features are uniform across pages. Though it doesn't present a side-by-side comparison like Fanpage Karma, the data is presented in a friendly enough way that you can easily take screenshots and import multiple analyses into a document for a competitive comparison. LikeAlyzer uses its own scoring system to assign each page an overall rank between 1 and 100, as well as averages within industry and similar brands. It will also give you metrics including likes, growth, engagement rate and PTAT (People Talking About This). Each of these metrics is accompanied by a green check mark or a red X, indicating whether the metric is strong or subpar. Additionally, the tool will check on different elements of your page by measuring responsiveness, timing, post type and page information (using the same check mark and X system). It also provides suggestions to improve the health of your page, such as what types of content you should focus on and when to post to get the strongest engagement. LikeAlyzer is excellent when you want to perform a quick check on your page, but you'll get the most benefit from it if you use it to analyze multiple competitors. Pay close attention to suggestions the tool spits out for other pages to determine where your brand can step up and take the lead. #3: Identify Influencers Klear, formerly Twtrland, serves as both an influencer-identification platform and an analytics dashboard. Search for influencers by skill and/or location and Klear will generate 10 influencers in multiple categories (celebrities, power users, casual, etc.). Upgrade to a pro account to see more results, starting at $249/month. You can view anyone's analytics profile by searching for his or her name or visiting http://klear.com/profile/USERNAME. This powerful dashboard will generate the account's top content on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram (if you manually add it). You can also see activity and responsiveness levels as well as a list of people the account most frequently interacts with.

৫ টি সার্চ ইঞ্জিন অপটিমাইজেশন (SEO) করার কৌশল।

by jobayercp @ bestearnidea.com

প্রতি মাসে 9,000,000 অনলাইন ব্যবহারকারীরা বাংলাদেশে গুগল অনুসন্ধান করছেন। এটি পণ্য বা সেবা হতে পারে। যদি আপনি আপনার পণ্য বা পরিষেবাগুলি 9,000,000 ব্যবহারকারীদের মধ্যে প্রদর্শন করতে চান, তবে আপনাকে SEO এর সাহায্য নিতে হবে, যা আমরা আপনাকে সল্প মূল্যে দিচ্ছি।…

The post ৫ টি সার্চ ইঞ্জিন অপটিমাইজেশন (SEO) করার কৌশল। appeared first on bestearnidea.com.

How to Research and Locate Your Audience Using Social Media

How to Research and Locate Your Audience Using Social Media

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you struggling to connect with your customers on social networks? Do you know where they hang out online? To optimize your social media marketing efforts, it's important to know who your customers are and which social networks they spend their time on. In this article you'll discover how to connect with your target audience on social media. Listen to this article: #1: Identify Your Ideal Customer One of the first questions I ask is, "Who is your ideal customer?" Some of the answers I've received include women, people who have to eat to survive, bosses, employees and people looking for work. While these answers may be true for you, too, they won't help you find your audience because they don't help you prioritize where to spend your time. John Lee Dumas has famously talked about identifying your business avatar. This means you'll want to create a fictional persona of your ideal customer, to the point of naming it, knowing how many kids it has or what it does on the weekends. The clearer your avatar is, the easier it is to find people on social media who resemble the persona. #2: Determine Your Audience Size Once you have a good sense of what your audience looks like, you can use Facebook Ads Manager to estimate the size of your audience. For example, if you want to reach women in Maine who are interested in nutrition, you can find out that 62,000 people on Facebook match that audience. This is also good business information, because if your audience is too small, you may need to change your offering to expand your audience. On the flipside, if your audience is too large, you might want to target a narrower niche to start. Of course, not everyone is on Facebook. According to recent research, almost 60% of Americans are on Facebook. That number may be more (or less) depending on where your audience lives, their age, gender and household income, but it's a good starting point. #3: Survey Your Customers If you've been in business for any length of time, you have customers you can survey. For the purposes of optimizing your social media campaigns, wisely spending your ad dollars and targeting guest blogging opportunities, you need to know where your audience hangs out online. As part of your survey, ask your current customers the following questions: What social media sites do you regularly use? What websites do you visit for information on _______ (for example, remodeling ideas, pricing strategies or whatever is appropriate for your business)? Do you listen to podcasts? If so, which ones? Do you regularly read blogs? If so, which ones? What people do you follow or pay attention to online? You can also use free tools like SurveyMonkey or Google Forms to collect your answers. In this video, Steve Dotto walks you through how to create your own forms with Google Forms. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwf72lwPLVY Google Forms is a great way to collect feedback on live events, for example, because it graphically displays your audience's feedback. Go to your form results and select Form > Show Summary of Responses from the drop-down menu. #4: Research Online Behavior What do you do if you're just starting out, your customer base is too small for meaningful results or you're expanding into a new category? In cases like these, or simply to supplement your surveys, you can research online behavior. The Pew Research Center has an excellent breakdown of where your audience spends their time online. It's not difficult to find studies and infographics that provide information on specific platforms or other countries. For example, check out this chart from MarketingCharts to see a makeup of the top social media channels based on gender, age, education and more. #5: Find and Connect With Your Customer Once you get the results from your survey and have reviewed the demographics of the available research, it's time to put that knowledge to work across different so...

How to know if your SEO company is the one

by Pure Visibility @ Pure Visibility

If you’ve been in the market for SEO services, you’ve probably read the articles detailing the warning signs of a bad provider: pitches or prices that seem too good to be true, buying links, and guarantees of #1 rankings top...

The post How to know if your SEO company is the one appeared first on Pure Visibility.

How to Use Native Ads to Support Your Social Media Marketing

How to Use Native Ads to Support Your Social Media Marketing

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you looking for ways to supercharge your social media efforts? Have you considered native ads? Native ads not only help build your social followers and boost social engagement, they also drive high-quality consumers to your branded content. In this article you'll discover what native ads are and how to integrate them into your social media marketing. Listen to this article: What Are Native Ads? The Content Marketing Institute defines native advertising as paid marketing that delivers useful, interesting and targeted information to your audience in a form that looks like the site's native, or non-ad, content. The different forms that native ads can take vary greatly. They can be Google paid search results, promoted listings on Twitter, sponsored updates on LinkedIn, Facebook promoted or sponsored posts or even articles on sites like Forbes, BuzzFeed, The Huffington Post and The New York Times. Native ads can also appear as content-recommendation engines at the end of articles. Here's how to start integrating native ads into your social media marketing. #1: Define Your Goal Whatever the form, native ads offer many potential benefits to your business. Joe Pulizzi of the Content Marketing Institute says native ads can help you build brand awareness and trust, plus help bring subscribers to your content. And keep in mind that your content doesn't always have to be new. Native ads can be a great way to attract new audiences to previously published posts. Additional benefits of native ads include SEO and social proof. Promoted posts on a strong social media site get your message in front of a larger audience and can drive traffic back to your website or blog. Native ads can be especially helpful if you have a new site and haven't had time to build up strong SEO. Unlike other forms of digital marketing such as banner ads, native ads on social media can collect social proof such as likes, comments and shares. This increases the credibility of your message and viral opportunities for your brand. More awareness can equal more authority in the form of links and social signals, which can produce better rankings. Native ads can also help you build social media audiences. A sponsored post on Facebook or Twitter can attract new users to follow you, and sponsored stories can grow likes and followers, but only when the content resonates with users. A sponsored post with little organic traction will do poorly. Promote social media content that is already popular for further exposure to a wider audience. #2: Develop Quality Ad Content To get the most from your native ad investment, focus on creating content that is helpful and interesting, attracts attention and provides value. And fight the urge to sell. Additionally, Zoe Robinson of Add3 suggests these best practices for native ads: Publish the content that the ad is promoting on your own site. If your article features an infographic, chart or graph, be sure it appears on your site first with its own URL. Include a call to action that links to your blog or other social channels. Quality content is key. Go beyond marketing and break down departmental silos to leverage the expertise of others in your company. Create content your audience will find less disruptive and more engaging through segmentation with tools like geo-targeting, demographics and interests. Zoe also recommends measuring metrics beyond traditional click-through rates. Consider metrics such as brand affinity or purchase intent to determine native ad success. #3: Use Native Ad Targeting PR software and services company Cision suggests targeting sponsored content to Facebook users who are already customers or lookalike audiences that share characteristics with existing fans. You can also retarget native ads to people who have come to your website to view a product or service or deliver native ads based on search interest.

How to Build a Blogging Team

How to Build a Blogging Team

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you struggling to publish regularly to your blog? Have you thought about bringing in other writers? With a team of bloggers, you can share the workload and keep your blog updated with fresh content. In this article you'll discover how to set up and support a blogging team for your business. Listen to this article: Why a Team? Posting regularly to your blog is not only a way to carry out your content strategy, but it's also the key to driving relevant traffic and awareness for your business. So if you're struggling to update your blog consistently, consider bringing in some help. Creating a team of bloggers can facilitate regular blog contributions. By sharing responsibility, you can provide fresh content on a regular basis and ensure that no single person bears the burden for the blog's success. But setting up a successful team is about more than just selecting a few people and assigning topics. And, no matter how many people you put on your team, keeping them inspired to create engaging content will require time and attention. Here's how to set up a team that's passionate and engaged, and most importantly, that follows through. #1: Assemble the Team The most important element of creating a blogging team is to choose people who really want to write and have a passion for blogging or the industry. You're asking people for an extra commitment, so you need team members who are excited to participate. Consider asking potential members to fill out a short application for entry to the team. And then launch the team with a formal announcement and an in-person kickoff meeting. Nothing creates a sense of enthusiasm and purpose quite like some team bonding time. This meeting can serve a few different purposes (some discussed below), but the main point is to get everyone on the same page with their roles and responsibilities, and to feel confident in their ability to contribute regularly. It's also a great way to foster team camaraderie, which again is essential when you're requesting work above and beyond a colleague's regular job duties. Every team member should also agree on what his or her specific role is, and then document it, sign it and make copies. There's something about signing an official document that reinforces the importance of a commitment. #2: Manage Workflow and Facilitate Communication The team is a team because each member is important. This mentality helps create a sense of accountability and responsibility among team members. It also allows people to volunteer for specific blog posts, pick up the slack when necessary and ensure that there's a reason (other than just the company's prerogative) to show up regularly to team meetings and write new blog posts. A great way to manage workflow is to use a tool like the Edit Flow WordPress plugin. It provides a monthly calendar, allows the team to collaborate on blog posts and sends out notifications so everyone stays on track with their assignments. Other apps like Slack and Facebook groups also allow teams to communicate and share documents without needing to be in the same physical location. #3: Create a Brand Identity and Team Mission During the formal launch, schedule time to discuss the blog's identity and the team's mission. And this isn't about an obvious mission like "Increase our brand's SEO, site traffic and overall position as a thought leader." It's about a mission for the team itself, something like: "Encourage our peers to actively participate in writing, reading and sharing our blogs and dare to create content that's informative and cutting-edge." Make this something the team creates together and that everyone can buy into. What are the adjectives you want to use to describe your team? Hardworking, passionate, upbeat, focused? Choose a few and make this your team's mantra, something you go back to often to encourage participation. Creating a team mission as a group creates a sen...

How to Manage a Podcast: Tools and a Checklist for Marketers

How to Manage a Podcast: Tools and a Checklist for Marketers

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you interested in starting a podcast? Want tips to manage and promote your podcast effectively? Creating a successful podcast doesn't have to be a time-consuming process. Today, tools can help streamline activities such as finding guests, publishing audio, and promoting episodes. In this article you'll discover how to manage your podcast from start to finish. Listen to this article: Why a Podcast? The key to generating a goldmine of compelling and engaging content is to leverage the expertise of others and interview them on your own podcast. A podcast is a win-win platform for your content strategy, because it provides an opportunity for both you and your guest to share your knowledge, feature your respective companies, and build a quality relationship with listeners. Inviting people with knowledge and experience in your industry to share their insights frees you from relying solely on your own knowledge. It also allows you to build a collection of quality content from a network of experts. Here's how to get started with your own podcast. #1: Find Potential Guests The first step is finding potential guests for your podcast. Are you groaning at the thought? Never fear, use a tool like LeadFuze to do the work for you. It's traditionally used by sales teams for B2B lead generation, but it also works well for identifying podcast guests. LeadFuze finds prospective guests by searching LinkedIn for categories such as industry, title, role, and location. It then aggregates all of the prospects' contact information, social media accounts, and domains into a list for you. By automating the prospecting process, LeadFuze saves you the hours of research typically needed to find good guests. #2: Send Out Email Invites Once you have the names and email addresses for guests you want to feature on your show, it's time to send out cold emails. In these emails you make your initial request asking the recipient to be a guest on your podcast. Send the Initial Email There are a number of mass emailing tools out there (such as MailChimp, Infusionsoft, and AWeber), but that's not what you need at this stage in the game. You'll want to send a more personal request with a tool like QuickMail.io. QuickMail.io is unique because it lets you automatically send one-to-one emails at scale through your Gmail account. It sends emails so that they arrive in the recipient's inbox as a personal email. This increases the chances of your emails being opened and not being filtered into a spam folder. QuickMail.io also lets you set up unlimited follow-up emails, which will automatically shut off once the recipient responds. Follow Up With Interested Guests Use FollowUpThen to stay in touch with prospective guests who responded to your initial emails, but haven't yet booked a day/time for your podcast interview. With this tool, you can add a simple email address to the BCC field on any email to remind you to follow up at a later date. You include your desired time frame within the FollowUpThen email address, and the email will then boomerang back into your inbox at that date and time. Once it's back to your inbox, it's up to you to decide if you need to follow up again. #3: Plan the Podcast Once you've lined up guests for your podcast, the next step is to choose a topic and set up a time for the interview. The secret to never running out of creative and compelling content ideas is to allow your guests to choose the topic for their episode. When guests ask you about the topic, say something like this: "We encourage guests to choose the topic for their episode based on their background and experience. Is there a certain topic you'd like to discuss on the show?" Next you need to work out a time for your interview. Unfortunately, we've all experienced the email scheduling dance: "Hi, are you free on Wednesday at 1pm?" "I can't do Wednesday. How does Thursday between 2 and 5pm?"

6 Browser Extensions for Busy Social Media Marketers

6 Browser Extensions for Busy Social Media Marketers

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you need to increase your productivity? Looking for browser extensions that simplify your marketing? In this article, you'll discover six browser extensions to help busy marketers. #1: Group Multiple Tabs Into a Single Tab With OneTab Some of the best tools are the simplest ones, and you can't get much simpler than OneTab. When you click the toolbar icon, the tool will pull all of your browser tabs into a simple list under a single tab. You can then organize, sort, and save that tab for later. Listen to this article: This free tool can be especially helpful when you're doing article research online. It's easy to get lost when you're reading article after article and following link after link. With OneTab, just click the toolbar icon when you're done and you can comb back through your tabs days or weeks later. The tool also gives you the option to save your newly formed list as a web page that others can view. #2: Save Web Pages With Evernote Web Clipper The Evernote Web Clipper is a fantastic free tool from the Evernote team. It lets you clip a web page and save it as an article, simplified article, full page, bookmark, or screenshot. After you clip it, you can add tags or comments and drop it into a folder in your Evernote account. You can then share that article with whomever you like right from the Web Clipper dialog box. #3: Edit Your Content With Grammarly Grammarly is a free, simple, powerful editing app that hides on your browser toolbar and edits your work as you write. As with many of these apps, there are both free and paid versions available. The free version offers a more advanced spelling, punctuation, and grammar check than Microsoft Word. You can paste your copy into the editor on the Grammarly website, upload a document, or just let the extension edit as you create social media posts in whatever program you're using. The app runs in the background, and if your copy is clean, you'll see a green icon. If your copy needs work, you'll see a red icon along with suggestions. If you opt for the paid version, you get more robust features like style and sentence structure suggestions, vocabulary enhancement tips, and a plagiarism detector. You also have the option to submit your work to one of their professional proofreaders. #4: Schedule Social Posts With Hootlet Hootsuite is a powerful social media management tool, and their Hootlet extension offers an easy way to create and schedule social media posts from within your browser. Cruise to a website article that you want to share and click the Hootlet icon to make the magic happen. You can then choose which social media account you want to post it to, edit the post, and post it now or schedule it for later. #5: Research Hashtags With RiteTag RiteTag is a great tool for researching relevant and trending hashtags. To access the free version, you need to use RiteTag's website. Just enter your keyword or topic in the search box. You can get access to the browser extension at the paid level (starting at $11 per month). This allows you to enhance your social media posts with hashtags related to the topic you're writing about. RiteTag's extension lets you upload images to your post, add emojis, edit calls to action in your links, and see your saved tag sets. You can even search for free images or GIFs to add to your posts. #6: Track Email Opens With RocketBolt RocketBolt works a little differently from other extensions. The extension itself doesn't do anything when you click it; but you need to have it installed to unlock its functionality. When used in conjunction with Gmail, RocketBolt lets you track individual email open and click-through rates. Marketers are used to this in programs like MailChimp and Emma, but those programs don't give you that information on the individual level. Why does this matter? Because you can see if a specific person is reading your email.

3 Tips to Improve the Search Ranking for Your Blog Posts

3 Tips to Improve the Search Ranking for Your Blog Posts

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are your blog posts ranking lower in search than you'd like? Do you want to rank higher for specific keywords? In this article, you'll discover tools and tips to help you improve the search ranking of your blog posts. Listen to this article: How Ranking for Keywords Has Changed Optimizing your blog post to rank high in search engines used to be straightforward: pick your keyword and make sure you use it in the title and a few more times in the article. If you picked the right keyword (and if your blog was well-established and referenced), you were most likely to rank somewhere in top 10. Keyword research has quietly changed over the past few years. First, search engines like Google have become much more sophisticated when it comes to understanding what "high-quality content" is. It's not only about how well your article is optimized: it's also how in-depth, useful, and comprehensive it is. Moreover, as Neil Patel explains, keyword stuffing will get you penalized, not rewarded. Second, the competition is growing: most bloggers know the basics of search engine optimization these days. It's harder to stand out and get ranked. Here's how you can get ahead of your competitors. #1: Include More Keywords The days when you wrote one blog post per keyword are gone. Google (as well as your audience) now looks for more in-depth long-form content that features a varied vocabulary including synonyms, related phrases, and concepts. The following tools will help you expand your keyword lists: Seed Keywords helps you crowdsource your friends and followers into suggesting related keywords for you. The tool creates shareable mini-surveys for your followers to help you brainstorm more ways to search for your topic. Soovle will generate keyword suggestions from multiple sources (Wikipedia, Amazon, YouTube, Yahoo, Answers.com, and Bing), giving you a good overview of how people search for your keyword on different platforms. Another tool that does the same (but supports fewer sources) is the Google Keyword Suggest Tool. It generates suggestions from Google, Bing, YouTube, and Amazon and it digs very deep, so you'll get hundreds of phrases to work with. Reference.com and Synonym.com will help you expand your keyword list with synonyms. If you're looking to optimize your existing blog posts, use Serpstat to go through your site, pick the most powerful pages, and suggest a list of "missing keywords." Essentially, these are words your competitors are ranking high for, but you're not. Now all you need to do is go back to your articles and optimize them for those missing keywords to increase your ranking. An easy way to optimize existing content for new keywords is to add new sections (with subheadings) targeting those new words. This helps content get more comprehensive over time, which naturally results in more social media shares and backlinks. #2: Refer to Notable People, Places, and Brands One of the biggest changes in search engine optimization is Google's focus on understanding entities. "Entities" are related notable people, places, organizations, brands, etc., which associate in some way with your keyword. For the easiest way to demonstrate how entities help in ranking your content, read this awesome case study by Bill Slawski. Bill took a well-optimized piece and rewrote it the following way: first by making it much longer, and second by including notable events and people. The result was astounding. The article started to drive referral traffic from people linking to it, and return visits. And yes, better search rankings too! Google pays special attention to entities when trying to understand how concise and useful your content is. Google has had years to learn to understand entities, concepts, and their relationships. Google's Knowledge Graph is an entity graph. Search for any notable name you're aware of to see how Google structures and relates entities.

SEO Yoast Tutorial: Effectively Using the Focus Keyword

SEO Yoast Tutorial: Effectively Using the Focus Keyword


B² Interactive

Not sure how to use focus keyword in the WordPress SEO by Yoast plugin? B² Interactive outlines which rules to follow and which to break. Learn more.

Internet Marketing for Beginners: 5 Helpful Tips to Make a Presence

by Long Tail Pro Team @ LongtailPro

Being new to internet marketing doesn’t mean you’re behind the pack. Virtually anyone with the desire to learn the ropes can pick up internet marketing with some dedication and practice. In the ever-changing digital world, it’s more important than ever to understand your place on the internet. Even non-digital businesses can benefit from learning internet […]

The post Internet Marketing for Beginners: 5 Helpful Tips to Make a Presence appeared first on LongtailPro.

How to Discover Social Media Insights About Your Competitors

How to Discover Social Media Insights About Your Competitors

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Want to raise the bar on your social media? Are you monitoring your competitors? Knowing what works for the competition helps improve your own social media marketing. In this article you'll discover six ways to reveal insights about your competitors' social media marketing. Listen to this article: #1: Analyze Your Competitor's Content Share Rates Ahrefs is a handy tool for SEO, but it has some excellent social metrics as well. If you want to look at more than just social sharing numbers, it has some stats that will give you a peek at how your competitors' content is performing socially. Open Ahrefs Content Explorer. Then type in your competitor's domain, and click Search. You'll see a spread of your competitor's content, along with a snapshot of share stats in table form. To drill down into the shares for specific pieces of content, click the down arrow located in the far-right cell. You can instantly see how the article is distributed on social media. This chart provides you with information about the sharing velocity of the content and the most popular platforms. You can access this information for every article ever published. This helps you understand how, why and when your competitor's content is getting distributed. Note: Ahrefs requires a trial sign-up or paid membership. #2: Find Out Who Shares Your Competitor's Content on Twitter It's crucial to know who loves your competition. If an audience loves your competitors, there's a good chance that they'll love you, too. Go to https://twitter.com/search-home and type in a competitor's Twitter handle and when you see the results, click Live to see Twitter users who are promoting your competitor's content. These people, for whatever reason, may follow your competitor on Twitter. They at least liked your competitor's content so much that they shared it. What should you do about it? You may want to reach out and follow these users yourself, share their content or favorite their tweets. Doing this will get you on their radar. #3: Identify Top Influencers Who Share Your Competitor's Content Every industry has those people who are actively sharing great content. Chances are, your competitors are benefitting from the social sharing of these individuals. How would you like to have these people sharing on your behalf? You can use BuzzSumo here, but if you don't have a paid account, you can carry this technique only so far. BuzzSumo imposes a daily limit on non-users, so you may have to wait a day to try this one out. (Or just buy an account; it's worth it.) Go ahead and enter a competitor's website so you can identify their top-shared content again. Now, click View Sharers. The list you'll see shows you who is sharing this content and why it's so popular. The information is roughly organized according to the top-ranked influencers. The people who are at the top are big on social media. They usually have lots of followers. If they have a website, you can also see that web address. One of the best features of this tool is the ability to filter results. Say you want to find only the social sharers who have a blog. No problem. Filter the results to show only bloggers. Now you can target the people who might be open to sharing your content on their blog, or who could be open to guest-posting opportunities. What should you do with this information on social influencers? Connect with them on their preferred social media network. Get to know them. Reach out to them and request retweets. Inquire about guest posting on their blog. #4: Discover Your Competitor's Most Popular Content What are the most popular articles your competitors are producing? What content has the most shares? Use a tool like BuzzSumo to find out. You don't need to sign up for an account to use the limited version. Enter the domain URL of the site your competitor uses to post content.

Twitter Ads: How to Advertise With Twitter

Twitter Ads: How to Advertise With Twitter

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Are you curious about Twitter ads? Want to discover the benefits of Twitter advertising? To explore what you need to know to get started with Twitter ads, I interview Neal Schaffer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Neal Schaffer, author of Maximize Your Social and co-founder of the Social Tools Summit. Neal also runs PDCA Social, a social media agency. Neal explores Twitter ads and what marketers need to know. You'll discover some of the differences between Twitter and Facebook ads. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Twitter Ads Why You Should Consider Twitter Ads Neal says that like many social media marketers, he's advertised on a number of different social networks, including Facebook and Twitter. When creating a social media strategy, Neal explains that marketers generally look to a consumer-facing platform. Most often this means Facebook, but could also include Instagram, Pinterest, or Snapchat. However, Twitter can go either way. It has a community of a few hundred million passionate people and is the place to connect with the media. Neal explains how he did A/B testing for a client with Facebook and Twitter ads that revealed it's more difficult to grow organically on Facebook than on Twitter. A majority of the budget was spent growing their Facebook community, while a smaller portion was dedicated to building a smaller Twitter community. After a few months, the Twitter audience had grown 30% to 40% (with no additional budget), but the Facebook audience wasn't growing because of the way EdgeRank works. Neal discusses the two different types of social networks for businesses: networks such as Facebook and LinkedIn where you can't engage with others as your business, and networks like Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat that let you engage as your business. On the latter type, your company can do a lot more organically than it can from your Facebook or LinkedIn company page. If you've been putting all of your advertising eggs into one social media platform basket, Neal suggests doing A/B testing to explore other possibilities. Twitter has a lot of benefits, one of which is connecting with mass media and journalists since it's where people go to find news. Neal says that after three and a half months of primarily advertising and marketing on Twitter, The Dr. Oz Show reached out to feature his client. Listen to the show to hear more about the power of Twitter for live events. The Difference Between Twitter and Facebook Ads With both Twitter and Facebook, you advertise on the networks' real estate. On Facebook, ads appear in the news feed, and on desktop in the right-hand frame. Based on his and other Facebook marketers' experience, Neal thinks placing ads in the timeline is best. Comparatively, ads on the right-hand side don't seem as effective. On Twitter, ads only appear in the timeline, just like on Facebook mobile, and "Promoted" appears in the tweet box. Neal shares two things he finds interesting about Twitter advertising. First, since advertising space on Facebook and the newer networks is in high demand, there's less supply. That means it's more expensive to advertise on these networks. Because Twitter has a lot more ad inventory available to promote products and services, Neal believes it's a little more cost-effective. Second, Neal finds Facebook ads are always changing, and the interface can be very complex. In comparison, the Twitter dashboard and ad interface make it easy to create ads. There's one screen and you know where you are at a...

How to Create More Exposure Using LinkedIn

How to Create More Exposure Using LinkedIn

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Wondering how your business can get more out of LinkedIn? Want to make sure you’re maximizing your LinkedIn presence? LinkedIn has a number of features that will work together to promote your business and its products. In this article you'll discover how to create an integrated LinkedIn marketing presence for your business. Listen to this article: #1: Get on the Map With Company and Showcase Pages If you want to spread awareness for a new product line, create a content hub for company news, publish employee success stories or distribute hiring resources to attract new talent, LinkedIn company and showcase pages can help you align your efforts. Create a Company Page The first step to establishing a LinkedIn presence for your business is to create a company page. Talk to key stakeholders within your company and gather the following materials and information: A high-resolution company logo and cover banner (no larger than 2 MB and 646 x 220 pixels) An approved written company description (up to 2,000 characters) A list of relevant keywords for the company specialty section General company information (industry type, organization size, URL, etc.) You're now ready to set up your company page. On LinkedIn, hover over the Interests tab and select Companies from the drop-down menu. On the right side of the page, look for the Create a Company Page section and click the yellow Create button. You're prompted to enter your name and company email address. LinkedIn will send you a verification email to ensure you're an official representative of your company. After you verify your email address, upload your company logo, cover banner image, company description and other details about your business. When you're finished, click the Publish button. Request Access to an Existing Page If your company already has a company page, you'll want to contact your page administrators to ask for LinkedIn account privileges. If you aren't sure who is responsible for your LinkedIn assets, make sure you've added your work email address to your personal profile. Then go to your company page and look for the Want to Help Manage This Page? section on the right. From here, you can contact page administrators and request moderator privileges. Set Up a Showcase Page Once you've set up your company page, you'll want to create other sections within it to market different company assets. LinkedIn allows you to do this with a feature called Showcase Pages. A showcase page is an extension of your company page and allows you to highlight other business lines, products or services, brands or even upcoming events that your company is hosting. Although showcase pages are directly connected to your company page, think of them as unique entities. They contain their own content, attract their own followers and have exclusive functionality, similar to how you'd share distinct assets on your website. To create a showcase page, go to your company profile, mouse over the Edit drop-down menu and select Create a Showcase Page. You'll then see options to get started. Creating a showcase page is similar to building a company page. However, you can provide more detailed information about a specific area of your business and bolster the visual aspects of your brand with the larger cover photo area. Rather than use your business name as the title, select a page name that both summarizes and sets the expectations for the content you'll publish on your showcase page. Keep in mind that the words you choose for your page name can influence how well your page is discovered through LinkedIn search. Distribute Content on Your Pages After creating a company page and affiliated showcase pages, you're ready to begin promoting and distributing content through these channels. Generally speaking, this is an opportunity to: Share your company branded content. Use white papers,

5 Ways to Find More Time to Blog

5 Ways to Find More Time to Blog

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Is there a blogger inside you, waiting to emerge? Need tips for producing more content? Writing quality content will help you attract more customers and increase your visibility. In this article, you'll discover five ways to find more time to blog. #1: Commit to a Niche When you're committed to a particular niche, it's easier to write for the audience you want to attract because you've already conducted extensive research on most of the topics they're interested in. An added bonus is to use their evolving interests to point you toward topics you haven't considered. If you notice that your target buyers are looking for advice you know nothing about, you know where to start expanding your knowledge. Listen to this article: For example, say you're selling artistic pieces for home decoration. You don't necessarily know everything about interior design, but your audience would appreciate advice in that area. In that case, you can research it. And if you can base the tips and arguments you share on your actual experience, the articles will be much more believable and your readers will trust you more. #2: Limit Your Time on Distracting Sites If you blog for business, you spend a lot of time online. You need to be aware of all of the emerging trends in your niche, and monitor the behavior and interests of your target audience. You also likely frequent Reddit, Facebook, and other sites to get inspiration for new blog articles. How often do you plan to spend only five minutes on these sites, only to lose track of the time? That's why you need the Chrome plugin StayFocusd. You can use StayFocusd to prevent you from spending too much time on distracting websites. It's easy to install and you can customize the settings for your own preferences. First, set the days you want StayFocusd to monitor. Then, decide how much time to give yourself for browsing. Finally, set a list of the sites you want the tool to block for you. When you reach your time limit, you'll get an eye-opening message that prompts you to get back to work. #3: Plan Your Articles With Mind Maps When you find inspiration for an article, your first instinct is to sit down and write that piece as soon as possible. Wait! Once you get the initial idea for the post, you should plan the structure of your article. If you take the time to develop an outline, you'll significantly speed up the writing stage. You can use an online mind mapping tool such as MindMup to create your outlines. Start with a unique and captivating headline, and then make notes for your intro. Finally, consider the main points you'll cover and create subheads for each of the different paragraphs you're going to write. Use the outline as a guide, and remember that it's flexible. You can make adjustments to the outline as you work as long as you maintain a focused thread in your article. #4: Use Tools to Curate Inspiring Content Inspiration is everywhere online, and it can be difficult to keep track of and remember it all. That's where a tool such as Evernote or Pinterest comes in. For example, you can pin all of the interesting online sources you encounter to themed inspiration boards. As your boards are populated with pins, look for a way to connect those pieces of inspiration into a complete article. #5: Source Quotes From Industry Research and Influencers When you support your tips and arguments with quotes from respected research resources and industry experts, you not only increase the value of your content, but also add depth and reliability. Begin your article with a great quote to drive attention to the problems and solutions you're writing about. Then, in each paragraph, use a few short quotes to corroborate your points. Remember, you'll need to credit each author and source you quote. Make sure you include proper attribution within the article. In Conclusion Many social media marketers and business owners get focused...

Publishing eBooks: How Marketers Can Get Started

Publishing eBooks: How Marketers Can Get Started

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Have you ever considered publishing your own eBook? Are you wondering what the advantages are for marketers? To learn more about publishing your own eBook, I interview Jim Kukral for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Jim Kukral, founder of Digital Book Launch and Author Marketing Club, and author of the book Attention! This Book Will Make You Money and many eBooks including Book Marketing for Kindle Authors. Jim shares his experiences with publishing in print and digital form. You'll learn about the various book publishing options and what it could mean for your business. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: The World of Publishing Jim explains why marketers should care about what's happening in book publishing. You'll learn how books can increase your credibility and help you close business deals. You have to give people enough information to incite them to give you their business and publishing a book can help you do this. A book is the best business card you will ever have. It's a game-changer. Listen to the show to discover why now it's easier than ever to publish a book in print or digital form. The benefits of an eBook Before Content Management Systems (CMS) existed, the only people who could put content online were those who could write HTML. Today anyone can put their thoughts and expertise out there. Jim explains that to publish a book today, you don't need to have a publisher and you don't need to print books that sit in a warehouse. Publishers are in the business of paper and the world is changing to digital. Of course you can still do print and print-on-demand. But why print 10,000 to 20,000 copies of a book to sit in a warehouse, when publishing an eBook is so much easier? According to Jeff Bezos, there are currently more digital books than print books. Listen to the show to find out why nonfiction is still outselling fiction. Where consumers find eBooks Jim talks about how consumers find eBooks on Amazon and other websites like Smashwords, Barnes and Noble and Apple. There is also a growing number of websites that recommend their favorite Kindle books. And if you already like an eBook, you can recommend it or loan it to someone through your Kindle device. Amazon has the Kindle Direct Publishing Select Program. On this program, authors give Amazon a 90-day exclusive right to sell the eBook. In return, Amazon allows you to give your eBook away for free for up to 5 days during this 90-day period. Jim shares how to discover the top 100 free eBooks on Amazon. Listen to the show to find out the benefits of giving away your eBook. How your book can be a lead-generator You'll learn how to use your book to bring in business. Giving your book away for free is a great lead-generation tool. As a marketer, Jim has calls to action in his books. You'll learn how he uses this tactic to leverage lead generation with his free books. When someone reads your book and reaches out to you, they are usually "warm leads."  They are more likely to do business with you. Another benefit is that people feel they know you after reading your book. This makes it easier for you to connect with them. Listen to the show to find out how books are lead-generators. How the financials work from the author's perspective You'll learn about the money you can earn with your book, depending on how you publish it. For printed books,

YouTube Strategy: How to Plan Your YouTube Marketing Success

YouTube Strategy: How to Plan Your YouTube Marketing Success

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you create videos for your audience? Are you curious about what works on YouTube? To discover more about YouTube video strategy, I interview Owen Hemsath. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Owen Hemsath, a YouTube consultant and president of Videospot, a YouTube consultancy that helps authors and brands succeed on YouTube. Owen also writes on YouTube strategy for ReelSEO. Owen will explore how to put together a smart YouTube plan and how to monetize your YouTube videos. You'll discover the importance of video today, as well as the biggest mistakes marketers make with YouTube. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: YouTube Strategy Owen's story Owen explains how he decided to pursue his dream of doing video. When Owen began making videos for his ecommerce website and started making money, he realized he could be more successful helping other business owners leverage YouTube than he could doing his own product demos. Owen is now a YouTube specialist and has a YouTube course that teaches the process of building a YouTube channel for business. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KgbwS4kfwyY He currently spends 60% of his time working with clients in a group setting and 40% of his time acting as manager for bigger channels that are looking to connect with brands and monetize. Listen to the show to learn about Owen's early experience making videos. The importance of video today Owen believes that because relationships can be formed through digital communication and social media these days, the value we place on face-to-face interaction has been minimized. Video brings that face-to-face interaction to everyone, since people can use video to develop a one-way relationship with their viewers. He shares that this type of interaction can take place on YouTube, Snapchat, Facebook video, the live-streaming apps (Meerkat, Periscope and Blab), Twitter and Instagram video. Owen explains the relationship between Google and YouTube, and why you're more likely to be found on search if you're leveraging a video content strategy in your overall marketing plan. Listen to the show to hear Owen's thoughts on why people are turning to video, movie comparisons to YouTube and predictions for the future. Mistakes marketers make with YouTube The first thing Owen cautions against is using YouTube as a compilation channel, a holding ground for every video you've ever made. For instance, you may have a couple of Q&A videos with your staff, an old commercial and some home video of the company picnic. All of these videos have low views, and there's no real cohesive strategy. The second thing Owen calls out is violations of what he refers to as the 3 Ps: Platform, Purpose and People. Marketers often violate the Platform when they repurpose their non-YouTube video content (Google hangouts, Meerkat videos or portrait videos) for YouTube. Repurposing leads to a violation against People. YouTubers want to engage with your content, comment and be a part of your community. He says that when marketers repurpose, such as putting their Meerkat videos on YouTube, they're telling their audience they don't care enough to create content for them. The third violation involves Purpose. Marketers need to have a purpose for their videos. They must figure out what they're trying to communicate with their video and the business objective of that video, whether it's to build subscribers, get more shares, grow a list or sell a product. Marketers who don't consider purpose when developing their content strateg...

Mobile Marketing: Are You Ready for the Revolution?

Mobile Marketing: Are You Ready for the Revolution?

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you have a mobile strategy for your business? Are you interested in discovering what the future of mobile marketing has in store? To learn how to market your business with mobile, I interview Tom Webster. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Tom Webster, the Vice President of Strategy and Marketing at Edison Research. He's authored studies such as The Social Habit and Twitter Users in America. He's co-authored a new book with Tim Hayden called The Mobile Commerce Revolution: Business Success in a Wireless World. Tom explores how mobile marketing impacts your business. You'll discover why successfully mobile marketing goes beyond technology, how consumer behavior is already being shaped by mobile, and how to respond to the mobile commerce revolution. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Mobile Marketing Why Tom wrote his new book  Working in consumer behavior and market research, Tom has tracked human behavior for decades. He helps brands figure out why humans do what they do. His particular area of interest is to capture the opinions and study the behavior of people out of their homes and on the go. For Tom, understanding mobile marketing goes beyond the technology. It's about being able to understand people's needs, wants, and desires while they are in transition, out and about, and away from home. This idea was the impetus behind his new book, The Mobile Commerce Revolution: Business Success in a Wireless World Listen to the show to learn how it's been possible for Tom's company, Edison Research, to study mobile behavior for decades.  What is the mobile commerce revolution Every year, experts in various trades are asked if this is going to be the year of mobile when, in fact, the year of mobile has already happened. According to Tom, the mobile commerce revolution is already upon us. You'll hear Tom describe the Starbucks mobile app as an example of how much consumer behavior has already been shaped by mobile. There's no special technology to the Starbucks mobile app. It's nothing more than a bar code on your phone that's tied to a method of payment. Yet it's eliminated the need for a wallet and made it simpler to purchase items using something Starbucks customers already have in hand: their smartphones. The use of this smartphone app has become such default behavior that it’s prompted customers to make a purchase at Starbucks when they otherwise might not have. If you base your mobile strategy on the technology, then you will not make it. Mobile isn't about technology. It's about being able to understand and enable human behavior. Listen to the show to hear what companies with successful mobile strategies are doing that others aren't. How marketers should respond to the mobile explosion  It's easy to be lulled into thinking that big data and clickstream analytics will give you everything you need to know to develop your mobile strategy. However, the first step when you develop a successful mobile strategy is to examine human behavior. Tom describes the mobile web as having three distinct eras. We've moved past the first two eras of optimizing for mobile and responsive design. We are now moving towards a new era of contextually relevant experiences based on a customer's unique needs and wants in the context of their specific location. Mobility enables this capability to happen. There is a serious measurement gap between the online and the offline interactions because our focus has either been on search or on purely technology solutions.

How to Create a Promoted Pin Campaign on a Budget

How to Create a Promoted Pin Campaign on a Budget

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want to add Promoted Pins to your marketing mix? Are you wondering how to budget for a Promoted Pin campaign? You don't have to spend a lot of money on Promoted Pins for them to be effective. Because they have long-term visibility, they're a sound addition to your Pinterest marketing. In this article, I'll share how to build an effective, affordable promoted-pin campaign on Pinterest. #1: Start With Effective Pins While promoted pins are an excellent way to get the most visibility for your advertising dollar, it all starts with crafting a great social media image. Based on your business specialty or niche, create images that speak to your audience. Listen to this article: Also, use tall images to make sure your pins get noticed. They stand out better and command the attention of Pinterest users. Give yourself a selection of images and pin them ahead of time, so you have choices if you decide to test out various types of visual content using different small budgets. Once you decide what image you want to use, here's how to craft an ad for your promoted pin. Note: Promoted pins are still rolling out in the United States. If you don't have access yet, join the waitlist. #2: Choose Your Objective Go to your Pinterest profile and click the settings button next to Edit Profile to get to promoted pins in the drop-down menu. Once you click the Promote button, you'll see that Pinterest offers you two choices: Boost Engagement or Get Traffic. To get maximum benefit from your promoted pin ad campaign, choose Get Traffic to Your Website. Keep in mind this is a future strategy that does the promotion backwards. While you tell Pinterest that you want traffic to come to your website, what you really mean is that you want engagement for your pins. #3: Create the Campaign Give your campaign a name and then decide on what date or dates you want your promoted pin to be seen. Since the budget is low, you don't want to stretch it out too long. If it's your first time promoting a pin, use Saturday as your day. The more you use promoted pins, the more likely you'll find the best day for your brand. Keep fine-tuning this aspect of your campaigns. Now, decide how much money you would like to spend each day. I recommend spending $10 for one day or spread $10 over two days ($5 per day). #4: Select Keywords for Visibility The next step is to pick which pin you would like to promote. Then use keywords to tell Pinterest where you would like it to be seen. This is one of the most important things you can do to get your pin noticed. Keywords should include everything that anyone searching for what you have to offer would think of. So make sure you hit all of the right niche-specific terms for your pin. Depending on your niche, you can see an estimate of how many weekly impressions your pin may get. #5: Determine the Cost Per Click After you set your keywords, decide how much money you're willing to spend for each person who clicks on your pin to be directed to your website. This is where you may think you need a large budget to get good traffic. However, we're not after traffic right now. We want the engagement in the form of repins. Come up with a low cost-per-click (CPC) number. I usually offer 15 to 25 cents per click. A low CPC ensures you won't run out of money if people get click-happy. #6: Review Campaign Results Once your campaign is complete, review the results and wait for the resulting traffic. For example, I only spent $5 on the campaign below. It received a lot of engagement and impressions at the time, and I'm still getting traffic from it today. The point of this whole strategy is to turn small amounts of money into traffic generators for your website in the future. The 42 people who repinned this pin will show it to their followers. When their followers repin it, it opens up new reach for you on Pinterest.

23 Tools and Tips for Social Media Marketers

23 Tools and Tips for Social Media Marketers

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you need to streamline your daily social media tasks? Looking for tools to increase visibility? The right apps can make a world of difference in the life of a busy social media marketer. In this article you’ll discover 23 of the top tools and tips shared on the Social Media Marketing podcast. Listen to this article: #1: BuzzSumo Chrome Extension The BuzzSumo Chrome extension shows you the share counts on any site you are on for all of the different social networks, including Twitter, which recently shut off the API that allowed third-party tools to collect Twitter counts on articles. If you want to track the number of shares a piece of content gets on Twitter, this plugin will reveal that data for you. There are a couple of other cool features that let you view which Twitter users shared a page you're tracking, the backlinks pointing to that page and other content from the page's author. You can also see some of the most shared content on that site and even analyze the website. The BuzzSumo Chrome extension is free but requires a free or paid BuzzSumo account. #2: Scannable by Evernote Scannable by Evernote lets you use your mobile device to take a picture of a document when you don't have a scanner. Pull up the app, hover the camera over anything (such as a piece of paper or a business card) and it automatically scans and crops it. Hold it over a business card, and like magic it scans the card without pushing any buttons. Afterward, it asks if you want to add the person as a contact. If your Evernote is connected with LinkedIn, it will create a contact and pull in their data from LinkedIn. Scannable is a free iOS app. #3: SumoRank SumoRank.com analyzes the rank and content of your Facebook page. For example, we tried it with the Social Media Examiner Facebook page. It told us our most popular post type, as well as our most popular day of the week and the most popular time to post. SumoRank shows monthly interactions and the average engagement per post type to give you a feel for whether video, link or image posts get more engagement. It even analyzes the engagement based on the number of characters inside the post, so you can determine whether short posts have higher engagement than longer posts. Plus, review your top posts over a period of time. SumoRank is a free tool. #4: Reverse Image Search on Google Have you ever seen an image on social media or on a blog and wonder where you've seen it before? Ever come across a saved image on your computer and want to know where you found it? Use Google's reverse image search to find out. Go to Images.Google.com, drag an image into the search box or paste in a URL for an image, and Google will show you other images that are exactly like or similar to that image. Easily find the origin of any image. Google reverse image search is a free resource. #5: Trello Trello is a project management system that integrates with Dropbox and Google Drive. The tool lets you create boards, cards with tasks on them to assign a deadline, lists and more. Plus, you can @tag people involved with the project. Each person assigned a particular task can leave comments, attach notes and drag in images. When Trello is open in your web browser or if you have the app on your mobile device, you immediately get an alert whenever you're tagged on something. Act on it immediately and you won't even receive an email. Trello is a free tool. #6: Reader View and Reader There are a few different ways to make it easier to read your favorite website on your desktop. Open Firefox's Reader View and click on what looks like an open book in the URL bar to remove graphics from a page's sidebar, and change the font size and the background color. Safari's Reader offers similar options. Either feature lets you quickly consume a long article without being distracted by things like animated ads and other chaos that you often see on ...

March’s Biggest SEO News, SEM Updates, and Social Media Buzz

by Pure Visibility @ Pure Visibility

Digital marketing changes every day. From the newest Google update to the freshest pay-per-click ad option or Instagram feature, it can be hard to keep up! Thankfully, we’ve done the hard work of finding last month’s top search engine optimization, search engine...

The post March’s Biggest SEO News, SEM Updates, and Social Media Buzz appeared first on Pure Visibility.

13 Instagram Marketing Tips From the Experts

13 Instagram Marketing Tips From the Experts

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Want to improve your Instagram marketing? Are you interested in the latest tips and tools for Instagram? Instagram is a fast-growing platform and businesses are eager to establish a presence and encourage engagement on the network. We asked social media experts to share their hottest Instagram tips. Here’s what they had to say. Listen to this article: #1: Shoot Square Your Instagram feed is only as good as your photographs, so starting with high-quality photos makes your Instagram marketing more effective. One of the best ways to save time and compose better photos for Instagram is to shoot square photos. Many digital cameras and smartphones have this in their settings so it’s really easy to do. This lets you save time on cropping and ensures that the essential elements in the photo won't be cropped out later. Because shooting photos inside the Instagram app can be limiting, I like to use Camera Awesome by the SmugMug team on my iPhone (also available for Android users). Using this app, you can take fantastic photos using the grid to follow the rule of thirds. Peg Fitzpatrick is a speaker, social media strategist and co-author of The Art of Social Media. #2: Use a Customized Link Shortener to Track Traffic One of the most important things marketers need to know is how well their Instagram account is driving traffic and leads back to their website. Unfortunately, Google Analytics can’t accurately track this traffic when users visit your website from your mobile Instagram account. To monitor accurate click rates, I recommend businesses use a customized bit.ly link (or a link from another shortener) exclusively for the URL in their Instagram bio. Then you can check your bit.ly data to document how many clicks your Instagram account is actually sending to your website. Create a different bit.ly link each time you change the link for a new landing page, campaign or default page to continuously track successful traffic leads. Jenn Herman is a social media trainer, blogger and Instagram advocate. #3: Be Strategic With Your Bio Link For personal use, Instagram is fun and spontaneous. But if you want to use it as a marketing tool, you have to be a little more calculating with it. I suspect the businesses that are really killing it on Instagram (like Nordstrom, Starbucks, Nike and others) plan their posts well in advance. If you’re a smaller brand or a one-man show, you can still develop a great presence on Instagram. Use the link in your bio to connect to a landing page that holds the same posts you put on Instagram, and allows you to collect leads, promote your ecommerce site, gain subscribers to your blog, collect entries for a giveaway, etc. Jim Belosic is the CEO of ShortStack. #4: Cross-Promote Your Partners Cross-promote whenever you can! The trend on Instagram now is to share the love, so to speak, by tagging others or even by outright promoting other companies, products and services. Locally we have restaurants that serve beer from the many craft brewers in the area. Both the brewers and the restaurants take full advantage of Instagram by tagging each other. The brewers also support one another with tap takeovers, which are rich grounds for Instagram photos and tags. The results are threefold: higher recognition for everyone involved, increased followers (who in turn tag the businesses during visits) and increased traffic and sales for the local businesses. Lisa Karl is a partner and founder at Savvy Digital Business. #5: Take Advantage of Trending Hashtags Users can now use Instagram's Explore feature to find posts related to trending hashtags such as #LoveWins, #CanadaDay and #FullMoon. If these trending tags are relevant to your brand, include them in timely posts to aid discovery. On the topic of search, Instagram also introduced the ability to search by emoji.

Facebook Live: Fuel All of Your Content With Live Video

Facebook Live: Fuel All of Your Content With Live Video

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you broadcast on Facebook Live? Want to discover how to use your videos to create more content? To explore why Facebook Live is a path to success for creators, I interview Chalene Johnson. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Chalene Johnson, a lifestyle expert, author of Push, and host of two top podcasts: Build Your Tribe and The Chalene Show. She's also active on Facebook with 1 million fans and regularly uses Facebook Live. Chalene shares how she uses Facebook Live. You'll discover what she does to leverage the content she captures. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Live Chalene's Background With Video While Chalene has developed a number of businesses, most people associate her with fitness and a program called Turbo Kick that she created for fitness instructors to teach in health clubs. Instructional videos were part of the program and when a cast member fell ill, Chalene was forced to be on camera. Since that time, she's done many videos and discovered the more she relaxed, the better she could connect with her audience, whether it was for fitness or business. Chalene first broadcast live on Periscope in the summer of 2015. She remembers it well because it was also the day she was hacked. Chalene stresses there's no correlation between the two events. You can listen to Episode 158 of this podcast for the backstory. When she got early access to Facebook Live, Chalene went live and applied what she'd learned on Periscope. Her first Live reached a half-million people within 20 minutes and she knew it was a game-changer. Listen to the show to discover Chalene's philosophy on the importance of doing things that are scary. What Facebook Live Is All About Chalene believes Facebook Live is like TV, meaning you can use it to spread your message, become famous, or have a reality TV show. Mike and Chalene discuss the connection between bloggers becoming paid authors, musicians on YouTube becoming paid recording artists, and the likelihood that a future show host will be discovered through Live video. Listen to the show to hear why podcasters should consider live-streaming video. How Chalene Goes Live Chalene and her team have an organic plan in place for her Live videos. The calendar is set around the promotion of the Virtual Business Academy, the Marketing Impact Academy, and Smart Success. Eighty percent of the content for each Live broadcast relates to the upcoming promotion, so it attracts the people interested in the related product. Currently, she's promoting Smart Success. Chalene aims to go live a couple of times each week. She's noticed that the longer she broadcasts, the better the video does in terms of reach and live viewers. Often, she plans to go live for 15 minutes but ends up broadcasting for an hour. Chalene's Live prep starts when she wakes up at 5:45 AM. She spends the first hour of her day in learning mode focusing on a certain topic. She then finds a way to relate what she's studying to the product she's promoting. For example, since she's studying the neuroscience behind behavior, discipline, and habits, she'll do a Live broadcast about developing good habits, which ties into her promotion of Smart Success. To prepare, Chalene writes down a proposed title, five bulleted discussion points, and any research or stats she wants to reference. She describes how to start a broadcast and in which order to share information. In the first 10 seconds, tell people what you're talking about and why they need to stay tuned.

We Analyzed the HTTPS Settings of 10,000 Domains and How It Affects Their SEO - Here's What We Learned

We Analyzed the HTTPS Settings of 10,000 Domains and How It Affects Their SEO - Here's What We Learned


SEO Blog by Ahrefs

An analysis of the HTTPS/SSL implementation of the web's top 10,000 domains and its effect on their SEO.

How Content Can Help You Build a Loyal Following

How Content Can Help You Build a Loyal Following

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Are you trying to build an engaged loyal following that loves you and your business? Have you tried to use video, podcasting or social media to build engagement? I explore these questions with Pat Flynn for our new Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This New Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a brand-new show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Pat Flynn, founder of Smart Passive Income. Pat shares insights into his tactics and strategies and how social media content contributes to the success of his business. You'll learn how to create content to publish on different social media platforms to connect to a large audience. And you'll discover the techniques to use to build a loyal fan base. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Social Media Content for Business The business strategy behind Smart Passive Income  Pat explains how content plays a key role in his business. You'll learn why his focus is to provide valuable content for those looking for information. You'll hear how you can do this when you share content based on your own experiences. Pat shares the results his business has had from his different content platforms: blog, video and podcast. Listen to the show to discover Pat's personal stories behind his successful business. How to make a personal connection with your audience Pat talks about the different ways he shares personal information about himself to connect with his audience and how he incorporates this into his business content. Pat shares the reason why he gives his audience strategic insights into his personal story. Pat shares how he connects with his audience on Facebook. You'll find out the strategy behind the different components of Pat's Facebook page photo and how this strategy helps him connect with his audience. People like to connect with people. You'll pick up some useful tips on how to build affinity online. Listen to the show to discover why Pat leverages his "trifecta" content creation strategy (blogging, video and podcasting) to connect with a wide audience. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bJIJ_6G9Z84 Pat's video strategy YouTube is the #2 search engine in the world. Pat explains how he uses videos to respond to questions from his audience. Pat explains how this strategy works well for his business and drives traffic back to his website. Listen to the show to find out how Pat intentionally uses keywords in his videos for great results. Pat's blogging strategy Pat blogs three times a week. He publishes content based on his own experiences and explains what he does wrong, what he does right and the results he gets. He's very transparent with all of the different processes. Pat talks about the Niche Site Duel, where he was challenged to build a website from scratch. Pat publicly displayed the process and how it reached #1 in Google. Pat explains the role email marketing plays in his business model and why it's crucial for business. You'll discover why email is still the best tool to use to connect with people in a direct and personal way. Listen to the show to discover insights into the business strategies behind Pat's successful blog. Pat's podcasting strategy You'll discover how Pat was surprised by the extent that podcasting helps his brand. Learn how Pat discovered that 20% of his readers find his website through his podcasts. Find out how to train your podcast audience to get to your blog with calls to action in your podcast. Pat uses the Pretty Link Pro plugin and domain names for easy redirect URLs to get podcast listeners to come to his site.

Influencer Marketing: What You Need to Know to Get Started

Influencer Marketing: What You Need to Know to Get Started

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Does your company work with influencers? Want to incorporate influencers into your marketing? To discover what you need to know about influencer marketing, I interview Lee Odden. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Lee Odden, an influencer marketing expert. He's the author of Optimize, the CEO of TopRank Marketing, and his company produces TopRankBlog.com. Lee explores influencer marketing and what you need to know to do it well. You'll discover how to work with influencers. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Influencer Marketing What is influencer marketing? Lee says the roots of influencer marketing are in advocacy and public relations organizations. You're essentially working with people who are really famous in an industry. The idea is to create an affinity for the brand for however that celebrity is known, and to reach the audience that celebrity has been able to attract. Lee adds that people still have the idea that if they convince famous people to talk about their company, then they'll be famous too. The reality is that, today, especially in the world of social media, people are empowered to follow their passions to create, curate, connect with others, and attract a following. This allows people to create their own influence. Everyone is influential about something, Lee says. Not just famous people can be part of your influencer marketing program. An influencer can be an employee like "Ted in engineering," who has a blog with 5,000 subscribers. Or, it could be that person with a million followers. It could even be customers who are advocating for you every chance they get. When you work with people who have subject matter expertise and an active network, you can advance your brand goals in some really powerful ways. On platforms like YouTube, Instagram, and Snapchat, there's a whole category of people called creators. They have various levels of celebrity, influence, or network size, and have anointed themselves as experts. There are marketplaces where brands can go and literally shop for a tweet, an Instagram image, product placement in a YouTube video, etc. For companies in the business of paying to play, it's a good fit. There are also brands that want to develop relationships with people who are truly thought leaders in their industry, or up-and-comers. They want to develop relationships, because they have an affinity for each other and have things their common audiences care about. There's no right or wrong, but it's important when setting expectations to know what you're going to get out of it. What is the distinction between a celebrity and a thought leader? Lee brought up an expression he borrowed from Scott Monty, "brandividual." This is someone truly invested in developing his or her own brand, except they're an individual. These professional influencers write books, give keynotes, and do all sorts of amazing things. Lee adds it's an important distinction to make between someone who is exclusively focused on being well-known and someone who is a true thought leader. He's not saying a brandividual can't be a thought leader. A thought leader is someone expressing original thought. They're creating content based on intelligence, experimentation, and observations. Brian Solis is a great example of a thought leader, Lee says. In addition to being really good at promoting himself, Brian is constantly experimenting. He does research. He interviews. And then collects, analyzes, and interprets the data. His experiments and experiences help form the thought leader con...

6 Ways to Increase Twitter Engagement

6 Ways to Increase Twitter Engagement

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want to encourage more interaction with your Twitter followers? Looking for ways to engage your Twitter community? In this article you'll discover six ways to increase engagement on Twitter. #1: Offer Personalized Encouragement The best engagement is sometimes a simple response. Customers are thrilled when you devote time to interact with them. It's a sign of respect and appreciation. Listen to this article: Nike encourages customers to #JustDoIt. To align with the brand's value of inspiration, Nike tweets words of encouragement to their followers. So if you're anxious about your next run, the company could be your #1 fan. To do something similar with your brand, thoroughly read the timelines of 20 to 40 of your followers. Identify tweets that announce major milestones (such as a new baby, running a marathon, getting married or a first car purchase). Then craft a short message (aim for three to six words) of encouragement. You can make the message more personal if you don't use any hashtags or add it to your timeline feed. Make sure you stay away from disingenuous comments. If your business isn't known for encouragement, your customers may be confused by the message. People desire human connections, and a great way to do that is to motivate people to reach their potential. #2: Share Their Tweets It's human nature to want to be validated, so retweet your followers to show you recognize the value of their content. Let them know that what they're saying or posting online matters. ProFlowers retweets their fans often. The retweets usually reflect the beauty of flowers, so popular shares include floral arrangements, mantel ideas and centerpieces. If your business is an extension of your personal brand, you may want to retweet content on your personal account. When retweeting your followers, choose tweets that align with your brand's values. Check the user's profile to be sure it's a real person. Also consider adding a comment to the retweet to contribute something to the conversation. Some experts recommend that you retweet only 20% of your tweets, while others prefer a 50/50 split. Find out what works best for your industry and your audience and go from there. #3: Include a Relevant Hashtag Create and promote a hashtag campaign to reinvigorate your community and spark conversation around your brand. Subway is redefining their image with the #SaveLunchBreak hashtag. The fast-food chain encourages people not to give up their lunch breaks and to eat healthy. The campaign also asks customers to show how they're enjoying their lunch breaks. To start a hashtag campaign, decide on the goal of your campaign and how it will relate to your customers. Then research what your audience is talking about to come up with a hashtag that they'll identify with. #4: Link to Problem-Solving Content One way to grab your followers' attention is to provide content that will help improve their lives. This is a great way to integrate your brand into their lifestyles and strengthen the bond between you and your customers. Whole Foods gives their followers tips on how to prepare and cook food. The supermarket chain regularly tweets seasonal recipes, healthy eating advice and cookbook recommendations. To identify what content might be valuable to your audience, read through your followers' profiles to discover their likes, dislikes and current influences. Select a common issue that they're dealing with (for example, finding concert tickets or locating a logo designer for their business). Then create content that presents a solution to their problem and promote it on Twitter. Avoid creating content that is merely disguised selling tactics, though. Customers will quickly notice your deception and may decide to take their business elsewhere. Rather than sell to them, educate your followers by posting information that they'll find valuable.

How to Increase Your Facebook Live Video Reach

How to Increase Your Facebook Live Video Reach

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you broadcast Facebook Live videos? Wondering how to improve their performance? Monitoring the reach and engagement of your Facebook Live broadcasts lets you see what's working and what you need to do to improve your results. In this article, you'll discover tips to improve the reach of your Facebook Live video broadcasts. Listen to this article: Why Broadcast Live? Facebook Live lets you create a stronger, more personal relationship with your audience. While Facebook gives priority to video in the news feed, Live video ranks even higher. According to Facebook, people spend triple the amount of time watching a video when it's live, because of the nature of live content: it's exciting, in-the-moment, and the next best thing to being there. Furthermore, two-thirds of Facebook Live video views happen after the fact. This, combined with the new engagement graph where viewers can skip to the parts of the video that get the most engagement, means marketers have more reason than ever to step up their game and offer good, consistent, engaging Facebook Live videos. Measuring Impact To get the most out of your Facebook Live videos, you need to know what works. Here's how to find your video data, understand it, and improve on your video metrics. View Live Video Summary Data To view your video stats, go to your Facebook business page and click on Insights at the top. Then in the left navigation, select Videos. On the right, you'll see charts with your video views. If you want to change the date range, enter the dates in the Start and End boxes. You can also choose from three options to filter your stats: Organic vs. Paid, Auto-Played vs. Clicked-to-Play, or Unique vs. Repeat. For both total views and 10-second views, you can benchmark to compare your average performance over time in each of these three areas. Below total video views, you'll see a chart with your 10-second video views. A video view in the news feed is just 3 seconds (whether the video is auto-played or clicked-to-play). However, Facebook shows page admins stats for views of 10 seconds or more. Hover and then click anywhere on the charts to see additional details. Overview metrics are helpful to see which days are good for your video posts, as well as to compare which types of actions led to video views. Look at Insights for Individual Videos To get specific stats for a video, page down on the same Insights page. They'll be listed by most popular video. Click Video Library to see stats in reverse chronological order. (You can also get to your Video Library section by clicking on Publishing Tools at the top of your page.) Note that you can use filters that are Basic (Title, Description, Views, Date Created, or Video Tags) or Advanced (Distribution, Embedding, Social Actions, or Live). To see all of your Facebook Live videos, go to Advanced > Live > Recorded Live. Select the video you want to review, and go through the stats for Video Views and Post Views. A quick and easy way to review stats for each video is simply to go to the video on your wall and click on the reach number. A Post Details report card pops up with two tabs: Video and Post. Video Views Tab The Video Views tab tells you Peak Live Viewers, Minutes Viewed, Unique Viewers, Video Views, 10-Second Views, and Average % Completion. Remember, a video must be watched for at least three seconds to be recorded as a view. Select any of this data for more information. For instance, Peak Live Viewers will tell you at what point in the broadcast you got the largest audience. Ten-second views shows how many people have watched 10 seconds or more of your video on any given day. The stat is divided by people who watch with the sound on versus the sound off. While you obviously want a high completion rate, a low completion rate is actually normal, even on short videos. If you get a high completion rate (even 25% is hi...

5 Ways to Use LinkedIn Publisher for Business

5 Ways to Use LinkedIn Publisher for Business

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Looking for a way to promote your business to a professional audience? Have you considered LinkedIn Publisher? Using a few simple tactics, LinkedIn Publisher can support business owners in their efforts to get more referrals, leads, and sales. In this article you'll discover five ways LinkedIn Publisher can help you grow your business. Listen to this article: #1: Create Conversions With Calls to Action Make sure you include a call to action in each LinkedIn Publisher post, whether it's to get more information from another link, contact you, or sign up for a free ebook or white paper. A call to action that speaks directly to your potential, ideal, or current clients will engage your audience and direct them to your funnel. Fabrizio Poli, who brokers private jets, offers downloadable white papers to his audience. People who are successful at generating leads with LinkedIn Publisher do a combination of their own content and sharing links to external resources that both inform and build their credibility. They also include a phone number, email address, or calendar link at the end of the post, so prospects can easily contact them. Fabrizio makes himself available in his posts by sharing his contact information and including a shortcut to booking a 15-minute call. Sharing a calendar link can be more effective for conversions than just your contact info alone. People may not be ready to talk to you now, but might be open to scheduling a time to speak with you in the future. #2: Establish Top of Mind Recognition Visuals can make or break whether people click on your LinkedIn Publisher articles. Cohesive, colorful, well-branded images will draw people to your article and drive them to open it. Human-resources professional Liz Ryan creates original images for every LinkedIn Publisher post for her company Human Workplace. The images are reflective of the brand, and users know by the visual that it's a Liz Ryan post. She uses humor and color to tell the story of her posts, which generates positive sentiment. Plus, readers get a sense of what the article is about just by looking at the image. Liz's approach to HR is unique in and of itself, and she uses consistently branded visuals (in her background image, within the post, on her website, in her media, and more) to get noticed. For your LinkedIn Publisher articles, you can use your own photos or stock photos, or create custom graphics with Canva or PicMonkey. If you're able to, consider hiring a graphic artist to create something special just for your brand. To add an image to the top of your LinkedIn Publisher post, click the camera icon in the header and upload your image. LinkedIn recommends a 700 x 400 image for the header. Be sure to add images throughout your post, as well. #3: Support Expert Positioning If you're already creating valuable content in the form of blog posts, newsletters, and other articles, you can repurpose content for LinkedIn Publisher. But you'll also want to create original content for your LinkedIn readers. One reason to publish original, unique content on LinkedIn audience is to use it as a testing platform. After you publish original content to LinkedIn Publisher, use the feedback to refine the article before you share it on your blog, as an ebook, or on a different platform. John White, Chief Marketing Officer of Social Marketing Solutions, offers a nice blend of existing content that he has repurposed for LinkedIn Publisher, as well as original content specifically for his LinkedIn audience. John's most-viewed post, with more than 600,000 views, 600 likes, and 1,900 comments, was repurposed from his master's thesis. Unlike what you hear about blogging, on LinkedIn Publisher the more words the better. The magic number seems to be 900-1,400 words. If you're repurposing a blog post that only has 300 or 400 words, consider expanding your content with more examples and case studie...

How to Optimize Landing Pages to Boost Social Media Conversions

How to Optimize Landing Pages to Boost Social Media Conversions

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want more conversions from your social traffic? Are you using landing pages? Directing targeted social media traffic to relevant landing pages helps you convert visitors into leads. In this article you'll discover how to optimize landing pages to boost social media conversions. Why Landing Pages Rather than direct social media traffic to your home page, landing pages let you send visitors to a page that facilitates the conversions you're after. Landing pages are web pages that are built for a specific purpose, such as obtaining leads or getting signups for an event, and are accessible through a specific link. You use this link in social media posts and ads, thus making it easy to attribute the traffic that comes to the page from your social media channels. Listen to this article: You should create separate landing pages to target segments of your audience with different offers. You can also split test the copy, layout and more so you can see which version is most effective in earning and converting leads. Here's how you can get more social media conversions by using landing pages. #1: Tailor Landing Pages to Offers and Audiences Think about who your ideal target market is. Consider their demographics, geographic locations, likes and needs. Then target these people through social media. Facebook, Twitter and now Instagram offer amazing targeting capabilities. For example, say that you sell organic, easy-to-prepare dinners. You decide your target market consists of 35- to 45-year-old women with careers who live in metro areas, and are conscious about their diet choices. When targeting, talk to your audience in their language and show that you understand what they want and need. Mention that you know they're always short on time but want to make the right choices for their families. Include a call to action to learn more about how "fast" and "healthy" don't have to be mutually exclusive. Solidify your success with a landing page that further explains the benefits of your product, why they need it and how to get it. Include relevant images of happy, healthy families and a short video testimonial from a stylish happy mom who has two preteens. Include a special offer where people can receive a free dinner just for signing up for your newsletter. After you've crafted your targeting, messaging and offer, watch your conversion rates go up. #2: Split Test Landing Page Variations While you might know a lot about your target audience, there is always more you can learn. Suppose people aren't 100% sold on your business and don't want to receive your newsletter. Split test by creating another offer with a 20%-off coupon that they can use in any grocery store that carries your product. Or maybe you want to experiment with the length of the text. You might be wondering if you should go into detail about your product and its benefits or write brief copy that simply encourages people to try the product. Or instead of pictures of a happy family, you think your audience would be more inspired by images of stylish, successful businesswomen. You can gradually split test as many variables as you want and gain more insight into your buyers' psychology. It's best to test only one or two variables at a time to zero in on a cause-effect relationship and track the differences in data. Discover What Makes a Good Landing Page Effective landing pages consist of a brief punchy description, clear benefits, a few striking visual elements (such as images or a short video), a testimonial and a strong call to action. Most importantly, they tend to focus on one offer or one goal. Here are some tips for building a successful landing page: Keep your page crisp, clear and to the point. Focus on the benefits of a single offer. You can also tailor the page for visitors from a specific social network. For example, Pinterest is known for its inspirational, highly visual content,

Quality Signals that May have Affected the March 2017 Google Fred Update

by Michael Martinez @ SEO Theory

Googler Gary Illyes declared that unless otherwise given a name by Google ALL of their search “updates” will be referred to as “Fred”.  He was joking but, honestly, I like that.  Some years ago I wrote a brief article titled…

Thought Leadership: How to Remain Top of Mind in Your Industry

Thought Leadership: How to Remain Top of Mind in Your Industry

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you consider yourself a thought leader? Want to know what it takes to become a guest on a major podcast or a speaker at large events? In this episode I go behind the scenes at Social Media Examiner with Phil Mershon. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Phil Mershon, director of events at Social Media Examiner. This show is the official third anniversary of the Social Media Marketing podcast. Phil and I will explore how we pick the thought leaders in our industry for our conferences and podcast. You'll discover how to become a thought leader in any industry. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. How to subscribe on iPhone. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Thought Leadership What thought leadership means Phil talks about the two parts that go into being a thought leader. First, there's the "thought" element. It starts with people who have excellent forward thinking, stay on the cutting edge and push boundaries, understand deeply how things work and are able to articulate it. And second, they must be a "leader," someone whom others listen to and follow. A thought leader does those things over time, consistently producing material that people will listen to month in and month out. Before I started Social Media Examiner, I was called one of the leading authorities in the white paper world. To earn that, I constantly wrote articles, started a blog, did training, wrote a book, summarized industry research and had a monthly newsletter. Establishing yourself as a thought leader is a lot of work. Even harder is maintaining it. Mari Smith is an excellent example of someone who chose to own her title of "Facebook Expert," and is having great results. Listen to the show to discover how long Phil and I have been working together and what we did before Social Media Examiner. How we decide who should be on the podcast and on our stages When deciding on our content, we ask two questions: "What should people speak about?" and "Who should speak about those subjects?" To determine what people will speak about, we look very carefully at the data, Phil explains. We study our annual Social Media Marketing Industry Report, which is based on the subjects our readers tell us they do and do not care about. It influences decisions about the kinds of speakers we need to find, which sometimes means we need to seek out experts we don't know yet. If you want to pitch yourself to a conference or podcast, it's important to first study it. Look at the organization's typical lineup to see what kinds of things people are speaking about, and determine if you're a fit. Not every thought leader is appropriate for every situation. We get inquires all the time from people who pitch us things that aren't appropriate. Listen to the show to hear how booking speakers is like programming for television. What we look for in our speakers Phil and I share the four criteria we look for in a speaker. 1. Are they a great communicator? We're not just looking for inspirational communicators, we are looking for people who can explain or teach at a very deep level how to use the different social media platforms. A lot of people think they're great communicators, but a lot of people also think they're good drivers. I share how when Sally Hogshead was keynoting at Social Media Marketing World, she said "Raise your hand if you think you are a good driver." About 95% of the hands went up in the room. Then she says, "Interestingly enough, research shows that only 55% of people are good drivers, so that means that about 40% of you are kidding your...

Social Media Science: How Behavior Impacts Social Media Marketing

Social Media Science: How Behavior Impacts Social Media Marketing

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Want to understand the psychology behind why people interact via social networks? During this fascinating interview I explore these very concepts. To learn about the science and psychology of social media marketing, I interview Ric Dragon for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Ric Dragon, author of Social Marketology and CEO of DragonSearch. Ric shares tips on how businesses can build relationships on social media. You'll learn how relationships develop and why the concepts of gamification and gifting are important. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Social Media Science How to develop relationships via social networks People look for other people like themselves, which is called group affinity. People want to find like-minded souls. It is much easier in this age of social media than ever before. Ric shares insights into the importance of small-talk in building relationships. You'll learn how small-talk is an extension of social grooming and how sharing a little about yourself humanizes you and makes it easier to grow your social networks. Ric talks about how people bring common salad to social media. Listen to the show to learn more about building relationships on social media. What gamification and gifting bring to social media Ric explains what gamification and gifting are and the different types of elements within social media. Learn why the most powerful rewards are the unexpected ones. You'll hear about different ways you can gift someone. Ric explains why it's important to measure the depth of engagement and also how to measure the effectiveness of your company's social media activities. Listen to the show to learn why the need to reciprocate is very powerful and relevant to your social activities. How communities develop via social media  Strong communities can form very quickly on social media and sometimes there are micro-communities.  Ric talks about how strong communities can form spontaneously on social media. He also talks about how these communities form around hashtags. You'll learn why listening is important for both pre-existing communities and when communities are forming. Ric talks about online ethnography—the studying of people in an in-depth way online. Listen to the show to learn about how communities develop. How to craft the right brand voice on social media People project personality onto brands and Ric explains why this is important to remember when you shape your brand voice. Ric shares how brands can create the right voice. For example, you need to make sure that even though you want individuals to have their own voice when they speak for your company, you also want this voice to be consistent. Listen to the show to find out why it's important to be consistent. The different subcategories of social media marketing  As social media evolves, the word community is thought of in different ways by different people. The expression social media also has different definitions for different people. Ric explains how there are at least five different types of social media projects. You'll learn why Ric believes brand management will experience the biggest area of growth. He says people are thinking most about brand management and when the brand has a really strong sense of purpose, it becomes a valued member of the community. Listen to the show to discover more about brands using social media well.

How to Easily Create Your Own Video Show

How to Easily Create Your Own Video Show

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Looking for ways to position yourself as an industry expert? Have you considered using video to increase your visibility? Using video to give your own take on news and stories that are relevant to your industry can help you build influence with peers, prospects, and customers. In this article, you'll discover how to use video to deliver value to your followers on social media. Listen to this article: #1: Gather Relevant News and Stories With the proliferation of news aggregation tools, you can easily select, filter, and digest stories, videos, and content from around the world. To collect curated content, use a news reader like Feedly (available in desktop and app versions) and add the relevant industries, brands, and blogs you want to follow. For example, if you're in the tech industry, you can add Wired, Engadget, and TechCrunch to your feed list. Once you set up your feed and find a great article on your topic, simply save it, share it, or bookmark it for later use. Additionally, you can create knowledge boards in Feedly that allow you to compile (and later share) the information in a single location. Now it's time to sort the stories you've curated. Think about your target audience when you pick out interesting articles, blogs, videos, and stories, and choose five stories that will be most meaningful to your audience. For example, if you're a small business, curate a list of the best entrepreneurial stories of the month. #2: Record Your Thoughts on Each Story in a Single Video Now it's time to record your thoughts on video. At this point, you're curating the news-gathering phase for others and telling your audience why certain content is more important than other content. For this reason, it's important to have the rationale ready for why you made each decision. Be ready to explain to your audience why each story is relevant and different. Much has been written about staging and how to create great video content. But in this case, the type of video you're creating is highly personal, so staging isn't essential. The simple webcam position is enough, and helps make your audience feel they're in a chat with you. Keep in mind that poor lighting or sound will raise red flags for viewers, so leave some time for testing and retesting your look. The actual sound bites can be as short as 30 to 45 seconds, and should explain, retell, or give an opinion on the specific piece of content you're discussing. Be ready to share a quick overview of what happened or why the story is relevant. Then, give your take on the matter. Record five short snippets (one for each story) on your webcam or phone and then send them to your favorite editing software like YouTube. If you're a novice to video editing, check out these simple video editing techniques. In building the actual video, how well you incorporate music, graphics, and images in your video will affect the quality. Regardless, even five quick audio clips of you talking can get your audience's attention. #3: Share Your Video Multiple Times Once you've completed the video, the next step is to create a post to share each relevant headline on your social channels, and include your video. By following best practices on social sharing, you should be able to use a trending hashtag to find like-minded consumers. You can also head over to Google Trends. From there you can map, chart, and study search patterns both globally and regionally. Make notes of the stories that generate a lot of activity, as well as any hashtags associated with those stories. When you share content from a written article, give the journalist or blogger who wrote the piece a shout-out. For example, tag them in a Facebook post, mention them in a tweet, and tag them in a LinkedIn update. This can encourage that person to share your take on the piece. From there, you should tweet influential people who have voiced their opinion on one of the stor...

The Myth of the Google Update

by Michael Martinez @ SEO Theory

People have been chasing search engine algorithms since the 1990s.  They won’t stop even though the algorithms are more elusive now than ever before.  Nonetheless, Web marketers should approach all unofficial announcements and analyses of search algorithm updates and effects…

More Marketing Time: How to Procrastinate Your Way to Success

More Marketing Time: How to Procrastinate Your Way to Success

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you spend too much time on insignificant tasks? Want to have more time to do what you do best? To learn how to multiply your time as a marketer by procrastinating, I interview Rory Vaden. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Rory Vaden, the co-founder of Southwestern Consulting, an organization designed to empower sales pros. He's the author of Take the Stairs. His newest book is Procrastinate on Purpose: 5 Permissions to Multiply Your Time. In this episode Rory will explore how busy marketers and business owners can get ahead by procrastinating. You'll discover how the principles of time management have changed over the years, as well as why and how to embrace the focus funnel. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. How to subscribe/review on iPhone. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: More Marketing Time Rory's backstory Raised by a single mother who sold Mary Kay cosmetics, Rory grew up around women who taught him the principles of success. Rory says it also means he knows more about makeup than cars. During college at the University of Denver, Rory was recruited to work in a program called Southwestern Advantage, where he sold educational children's reference books door-to-door and eventually managed salespeople. He says that's where he developed a passion for sales. In 2006, Rory and three others started Southwestern Consulting, with the mission to help salespeople achieve their goals in life. They now have 115 team members and are working with more than 1,000 people. Rory's first book, Take the Stairs, is all about the psychology of overcoming procrastination, improving self-discipline and getting yourself to do things you know you should do that you don't feel like doing. It answers the question, "How do the most disciplined people in the world get themselves to be disciplined?" Rory's second book, Procrastinating on Purpose, addresses the question, "How do the most successful people today think about time and do they believe the same clichés we often hear about time management?" Rory says a lot of them don't. Listen to the show to discover what launched Rory's speaking career. Why people struggle with time management Rory says there is no such thing as time management, only self management. In the world we live in today, time management isn't just logical, it's emotional. Our feelings of guilt, fear, worry and anxiety, as well as our desire for success and our need to feel valued dictate how we spend our time—as much as our inbox, our to-do list and our calendar do. There's also a new type of thinker that has emerged: the multiplier. Rory shares the history of time management. Era one time-management thinking is one-dimensional. It was developed in the 1950s and 1960s, and was all about efficiency. All things being equal, doing things faster is better. However, there is a point of diminishing returns with efficiency. Era two time-management thinking is two-dimensional. This was ushered in by Dr. Stephen Covey, author of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, in the late 80s. Dr. Covey gave us the time-management matrix. The Y axis was importance (how much something matters) and the X axis was urgency (how soon it matters), so it was a way to score tasks and prioritize based on their score. While prioritizing is a relevant skill today, there is a massive limitation—nothing about prioritizing creates more time. Rory believes you cannot solve today's time-management problems with yesterday's time-management solutions. People who are multipliers, Rory says,

5 Tips for Selling Products on Instagram

5 Tips for Selling Products on Instagram

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you wondering how to sell your products on Instagram? Want some tips to get started? To make the most of interactions with customers on Instagram, your images and descriptions need to stand out and purchasing needs to be as easy as possible. In this article you'll discover five tips for selling your products on Instagram. Listen to this article: #1: Develop a Signature Look Before you start posting, think about how you want to position your products on your page. The right product placement is key to driving Instagram sales and engagement. Identify the aesthetic you want for your page and stick to it. Once you have your product shots, use Instagram's internal filters or an app like VSCO Cam to make your photos visually sharper and clearer. Remember that you want to showcase the true product to your customers, so sometimes no filter works best in social selling. If you want to show one product in a variety of ways, try the Instagram Layout app. The app makes it easy to combine multiple images into a single image. Use it to show your product at different angles, which is particularly useful for fashion and jewelry businesses. Rocksbox showcases their products in an effective and consistent manner on their Instagram page. They feature close-ups of their products or have a model wear them. People can really see the products and find out how to incorporate them in their everyday fashion. #2: Give Product Descriptions Something Extra While it's important to be clear about what you're selling, you also need to attract the attention and interest of likely customers with your descriptions. One way to do that is to add a few relevant emojis. They help break up the copy and work well with an emoji-obsessed demographic. Birchbox uses emojis to detail their products and how to purchase them. Here, the emojis help viewers understand what scents are in each perfume. #3: Promote Product Visibility in Search With Hashtags Hashtags have a lot to do with how your products get discovered on Instagram. You can use Instagram's Search and Explore feature to view the top hashtags for your demographic and vertical, and then use three to five of them in your social selling campaigns. Don't forget to create and use your own branded hashtag, too. Do a daily search for that hashtag to see who's using it, and consider regramming the best photos or videos from fans on your own marketing platforms. Use the Regram app to easily feature your customers' photos on your Instagram feed. #4: Make Purchasing Easy Now it's time to convert your followers into customers. Use an Instagram selling tool like Have2Have.It to add a shoppable link to your Instagram bio. This will eliminate the clunky user experience created when you include a website or Bitly link in your product posts. By clicking on the link in your bio, followers are taken to a page (with the same look and feel as your Instagram page) where they can purchase your products. You can import your products from ecommerce databases like Shopify and WooCommerce into Instagram, and analyze the results so you know what products are converting. Then you can focus on promoting those products to increase sales. The Have2Have.It dashboard also includes conversion tracking, so you can attribute revenue to the platform itself. For social media managers trying to prove ROI for Instagram, this is key in social selling. #5: Partner With Influencers You can expand brand awareness and increase sales by partnering with Instagram influencers to reach an audience that's specifically targeted to your products and services. Simplify the process of connecting your brand and influencers with a tool like Captiv8. From search, discovery and workflow management, you can solidify the relationship right in the marketplace. Figure out the best product placement that's in line with the influencer's authentic voice and the trending hashtags and cop...

4 Tools to Improve Your Social Media Marketing

4 Tools to Improve Your Social Media Marketing

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Does social media marketing contribute to your bottom line? Are you looking for tools to boost your ROI? As social media changes from an engagement-driven environment to a conversion-driven one, new tools are emerging to help you market more effectively. In this article you'll discover four tools to improve your social media marketing. Listen to this article: #1: Connect Locally With Pointro When we think of local marketing, a narrow set of marketing choices comes to mind, such as offline marketing in local communities through events, sampling at stores, posters and fliers handed out by high-schoolers and the like. Alternately, local marketing also refers to local SEO and how to get visitors who are searching for what you offer online to walk into your store. Pointro is a relatively new social media tool that allows local business owners to connect with patrons in real time and offer them excellent service at the point where it matters most. You get a notification each time a customer checks into your restaurant or store. You can then listen to the conversation and chime in where you're needed. You also get instant access to photos taken by customers at your location and shared with their networks on social channels. Use this user-generated content to showcase customer loyalty to your brand and to enhance your credibility with future customers. Keep in mind that according to a HubSpot survey, 73% of users are likely to buy from a brand that responds to them on social media. Using Pointro to tap into that preference will build a relationship that leads to a conversion. #2: Focus on Loyal Advocates With ManageFlitter Managing relationships with social media brand advocates is a huge part of a successful social media program. Brand advocates are satisfied customers who directly impact the perceptions of other followers towards your business on social media. They also help spread a good word about your business far beyond your immediate network. In other words, cultivating brand advocates can be a huge win for converting undecided users. To be able to focus your energies on brand advocates, you need to know who matters and who doesn't. ManageFlitter is a tool that allows you to pare down your Twitter follower lists to only those users who truly like and engage with your brand on social media. By weeding out accounts that are dormant or have unfollowed you, you're freeing up your time and not wasting your marketing budget on fans that exist in name only. ManageFlitter also gives you the best times of day to publish posts for the best response, which is particularly helpful if you have a business or brand that operates across multiple time zones. #3: Reward Purchase Sharing With AddShoppers As previously discussed, brand advocates hold immense power in convincing other users to convert to your brand. A few years ago, Nielsen’s Global Trust in Advertising study revealed that 92% of customers trust recommendations from friends and family when making a purchase decision. This means the friends and families of your existing customers have the potential to turn into easy conversion targets. All you need to do is reach them at the right time with the right message. AddShoppers is a suite of tools that allows you to do that. One of AddShoppers' key features is the purchase-sharing auto-prompt that appears as soon as users complete their purchase. This feature allows users to share the details of their purchase (product descriptions, website URL, pricing and more) on social media. The tool also allows you to offer rewards (future purchase discounts, free shipping, etc.) to customers for sharing their purchases on social media. AddShoppers works well with ecommerce sites built on nearly every platform, including (but not limited to) WordPress, Shopify, Magento and PrestaShop. #4: Deliver Relevant Content With Tweet Jukebox Social media automation is a lot more than just sc...

How to Target Your Facebook Ads to Business Locations

How to Target Your Facebook Ads to Business Locations

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want to get your Facebook posts in front of an audience at a specific physical location? Have you considered targeting people based on where they work? Using workplace targeting makes it easy to get your content in front of the right people at the right company. In this article, you'll discover how to use workplace targeting to serve Facebook ads to people who work at specific companies. Listen to this article: Why Use Workplace Targeting? Simply put, it works. It's one of the most effective ways to target users on Facebook, especially when it comes to informing the media and other influencers. There are other uses, too: If you own or manage a restaurant, publish posts about your daily specials and promote your posts to people who work at the businesses within walking distance. If you're promoting an article about the top events in your town, you could target people who work at the local university and other companies to help spread the word. If you run a PR agency, you can post links to successful client stories you were involved with and promote them to decision-makers who work at companies you'd like to represent. If you're pitching to investors or journalists, you can amplify your best content to impress people before your meeting. The possibilities are endless, and here's how you can get started. #1: Create Your Targeted Campaign First, you'll need to decide what you want to achieve out of this Facebook ad campaign. Based on that goal, choose the content you want your target audience to see. If you want to highlight external content, create a post that links to an article, video, or image. You can also use this technique to drive engagement on native posts, like this one. After you've posted to your page, you're ready to get your page post in front of the right people at the right company. Open up your Ads Manager, either directly or through Business Manager, and click Create Campaign. You'll then be taken to a screen with many objectives to choose from. For this example, the best option is the first, Boost Your Posts. Click on the Boost Your Posts objective and you'll see a sidebar come out on the right. Use the sidebar to select the post you'd like to promote. You can also give your campaign a name. Then click the Set Audience & Budget button to continue. #2: Define Your Campaign Audience Here's the fun part. This is where you get to target the people you want to see your ad. You want to target by workplace. To find that option, click the More Demographics drop-down menu, click on Work, and select one of the workplace targeting options. This example targets Employers. Enter the name of the company you'd like to target in the box that appears. You'll also want to change the location targeting to match the geographic location of the company you're targeting. If your target has multiple offices, this helps ensure you're targeting the right audience. #3: Set Your Campaign Budget Start with spending $1/day for around two weeks. As you learn more about how your ads perform, you can adjust your budget and scheduling as needed. This campaign example is set to run for 10 days at $1/day. You'll notice the option to give your ad set a name down at the bottom of the page. This is helpful when you're dealing with multiple ad sets under a single campaign. #4: Create Your Ad Double-check that everything looks the way you want it to. Don't worry about optimization, bid amount, when you get charged, ad scheduling, or delivery type; just make sure that your budget, duration, and campaign name are set. When you're satisfied, click Choose New Ad Creative. #5: Choose Your Ad Creative After creating your campaign, it's time to make an ad for the page post you made in Step 1. You can select that post from the Select an Existing Page Post drop-down list to the left of the preview.

Twitter Traffic: How to Double Your Traffic to Your Content

Twitter Traffic: How to Double Your Traffic to Your Content

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use Twitter for business? Are you wondering how to use Twitter to increase traffic to your blog? To learn how to use Twitter to grow your business, I interview Kim Garst for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Kim Garst, CEO of Boom Social, a company and blog that specializes in social media marketing. One of Kim's areas of topical expertise is Twitter marketing. Kim shares how she uses Twitter to promote her content and offers. You'll learn about what type of content works best and how frequently you should share it. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Twitter for Business How do you use Twitter to help your business? Kim describes many ways to leverage Twitter to help grow your business. One way is to use news updates. Kim refers to Twitter as the "info superhighway." A lot of people don't use Twitter search in the same context as they would with Google. In many cases, the news hits Twitter before it hits the major news channels. There are real people out there who share real information in real time. With Twitter, you can leverage the search function as a way to keep track of your competition. You can search for keywords and find conversations in real time. It's a great way to pay attention to trending topics. You'll hear an example of a news story where 85% of the people polled said they found out about an incident on Twitter before the traditional news got the information. One of the biggest values that Kim has found for Twitter is to drive traffic. It's the most responsive targeted traffic source that you can have at your fingertips. Listen to the show to find out how Kim uses Twitter to drive traffic to her Facebook Page. How Twitter can drive more traffic to a website Kim describes the free offers on built-in tabs on her Facebook Page and why she tests them first on Facebook. Twitter is unique in that you can share your free offer 2-3 times a day; whereas on your Facebook Page it would be considered overkill. A tweet has a lifespan of about 30 seconds, so you can share your free offers multiple times a day and it's seen as acceptable. Different viewers see them as they come through their news feeds. Kim explains the strategy behind sharing the same link multiple times a day and why you shouldn't use the same tweet throughout the day. You'll want to switch them up and test different wording to see what people respond to the most. Kim uses HootSuite to schedule her tweets. You'll find out why it's the number-one opt-in source for leveraging her Twitter traffic to her Facebook Page. Kim shares how she monitors and keeps track of each tweet's performance and why you should only run 2 or 3 at a time, otherwise it's overwhelming. You'll hear what type of content Kim shares from her own articles and how frequently she schedules them. Twitter is Kim's number-one traffic source. She has leveraged the same concept for her clients and increased their traffic by 100-400%. Kim highly recommends that you share content that is still relevant and holds value. You'll hear an example of how to use a hashtag when promoting a blog article and why hashtag content has more relevance. Listen to the show to find out what is one of Kim's top converters. Common mistakes businesses make on Twitter Kim says the mistake people make with their Twitter account is to remain inactive. You need to be consistent regardless of which platform you use,

Google Analytics: How to Make Smart Marketing Decisions

Google Analytics: How to Make Smart Marketing Decisions

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you want to know if your content and social activities are supporting your business? Are you wondering how you can use Google Analytics to track your progress? To learn how to use Google Analytics to help make smart marketing decisions, I interview Andy Crestodina for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Andy Crestodina, author of Content Chemistry and co-founder of Orbit Media (a Chicago-based web design agency). Andy has also written for Social Media Examiner and he's a Google Analytics expert. Andy shares how to use Google Analytics to help you make informed marketing choices. You'll discover why analytics are so important to your business success and step-by-step instructions on how to get started. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Google Analytics Why go beyond the basic metrics of blog comments, social share numbers and page views? Andy explains that these basic metrics will not give you return on investment (ROI) information. The formula he uses is traffic × your conversion rate = success, which can be leads, subscribers or ecommerce customers. The more you're aware of how things are connected and the deeper you look down the funnel, the more equipped you'll be to make better decisions. It's just like the dashboard of a car. You'll hear what happened when I looked a lot deeper into the analytics of a Social Media Examiner article that ranks number one in Google search, and why it made me realize that it wasn't doing as well as I thought. As a marketer, you need to reprogram your mind to what really matters, and it's not what immediately meets the eye. Listen to the show to find out why it's so important to pay attention to the conversion rate. Do you need to be a data nerd to benefit from all of this? Andy says that you don't have to be a data nerd. The only math you need to know is that anything times zero equals zero. Andy relates it to a Magic 8 Ball. You can ask a question, shake up the analytics and find the answer. As a marketer, you need to know how to look at these numbers. It gets easier over time. For every action you take, you can measure it and see if it works, and then make improvements. Listen to the show to find out why Google Analytics is similar to using Photoshop. Common mistakes marketers make with Google Analytics According to Andy, it always comes down to the setup of Google Analytics. There are two or three basic steps you need to take in the Admin section of Google Analytics that make your data much more meaningful. One of the first things you need to do is filter out the traffic from your own IP address. Until you do this, your analytics will be polluted by your own activity. Within the Admin section, you can create an IP address filter. To find out what your IP address is, just type "What is my IP?" into Google search, and it will give you the number. You'll discover what to do with this number in the dashboard to ensure your results are more meaningful. The next step (which is important) is goals. Until you set up your goals, you'll only have half of the picture. Listen to the show to find out what's important if you are a relatively low-traffic site or you're into content or social media marketing. The definitions of goals and conversions A conversion is when a visitor takes an action on a website. There are different types of conversions and analytics that you can set up,

3 Ways to Advertise on Twitter

3 Ways to Advertise on Twitter

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you thinking about running Twitter ads? Wondering what your options are? Twitter advertising isn't difficult to set up, and for a very small amount of money it can provide an additional stream of traffic, customers and revenue. In this article, you'll discover three cost-effective ways to advertise on Twitter. Determine Your Campaign Budget To control the cost of your campaign and minimize your risk, it's important to set a total and daily budget. This means you'll have to decide the value of a new follower, lead or click-through to your website. Listen to this article: When choosing the amount, you should pay less than the result is worth to you. Otherwise you'll lose money. Remember, though, to take into account the lifetime value of a new customer or lead, not just the initial value of that first action. When you're satisfied with the numbers, set aside the total amount of money you're prepared to spend; this is your total budget. Divide your total budget by the number of days you're going to run your campaign (say three or four days); this is your daily maximum budget. Adjust these figures as necessary, depending on your comfort level and the metrics that apply to your business. Remember, your first attempts at Twitter advertising should be viewed as an experiment. It's an investment in figuring out the winning formula for your business. When you have your budget figures ready, it's time to set up advertising for the three most effective objectives: increasing followers, traffic and leads. #1: Attract New Followers Follower campaign ads are designed to increase visibility and grow your followers. They appear as Promoted Tweets in the person's timeline, and as Promoted Accounts in the Who to Follow boxes on the Home, Profile, and Search results pages. To create a Promoted Account campaign, go to Twitter Ads. If this is your first time in Twitter Ads, you'll be prompted to enter your country, time zone and payment details. Next, choose Followers from the Select a Campaign Objective menu, and give your new campaign a name. Set the campaign dates and select the audience you want to target with your campaign. Next, enter the location, gender and language of the people you want to reach and the devices you want your ads to appear on. You can further target your audience by the people they follow, their interests, behaviors and demographics, the events they're interested in and even the pets they have. There's a wealth of options for targeting the audience for your ads, but you don't want to choose too many in one go. When you add more than one audience feature, your ads will be shown to people who fit any of the criteria, rather than all of them, thus broadening your audience instead of narrowing it. The more tightly targeted your audience is, the easier it is to see which ads are performing and which are not. If there's a number of things you want to target, it's better to split them into separate campaigns so you can measure the results more effectively. A sensible starting point for your first campaign might be simply to target people who follow a competitor, or people who have a particular interest that you can select from the list. You can also upload your own lists of people to target by their email address or Twitter ID, or retarget people who visited your website. Once you've defined your audience, choose an amount you're comfortable with to set your daily maximum budget and a total budget for the campaign. Click on Show Advanced Options to see your pricing options. I recommend you set either a target bid, or a maximum bid, depending on how much a new follower is worth to you. Next, create some tweets that will show in mobile and web timelines. In your tweets, include the words "Follow us" and tell people why they should follow you. I recommend that you don't include an image or any links,

Purpose: How Facebook Built an Empire

Purpose: How Facebook Built an Empire

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Does your business have a purpose? Are you wondering how having a purpose can help drive the success of your business? To learn how Mark Zuckerburg has grown his empire, I interview Ekaterina Walter for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Ekaterina Walter, a global social innovation strategist at Intel and member of the board of directors for Word of Mouth Marketing Association. She is also the author of the new book, Think Like Zuck: The Five Business Secrets of Facebook's Improbably Brilliant CEO Mark Zuckerburg. Ekaterina shares her knowledge about Facebook's purpose and how it helped them build an empire. You'll learn why Facebook has been so successful and what it means to have a purpose. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: The Facebook Empire Ekaterina's Facebook story. Ekaterina shares her story of when she started using Facebook for personal reasons and found what it could do for her. She discovered connections she was able to make with people who have shared interests, whether she knew them or not. She talks about how she uncovered interesting stories that she may not have found through other channels. Facebook helped her understand her connections better and by following them, she could see what was important to them. From a business perspective, about 4 years ago, Intel looked at engaging with its customers on Facebook. They first started with a Facebook Page and shared messages there like other brands, without thinking about creating a two-way dialogue. They quickly realized this wasn't the right way to approach relationships with customers. But they also understood that this was a goldmine: the ability to build relationships right there on the digital platform. Twenty to thirty years ago, Intel used to go into computer clubs to find tech-savvy people and trendsetters in user technology, because these people would then go on to tell the mainstream audience and their friends or relatives. Back then, if you talked to 50 people at a time, either face-to-face or over the phone, you were lucky. Today the Facebook platform allows Intel to connect with almost 15 million fans on their global Page and over 2o million across multinational Pages on a daily basis. It's a place where they can truly engage with their fans and understand them. Before Facebook, this would never have happened. This is the biggest community Intel was ever able to build globally. Over the past 4 years, Intel has been building their communities and engaging in the conversations. Listen to the show to find out why Facebook is exciting for a brand person or marketer. Ekaterina's role within Intel. Ekaterina's role within Intel is to figure out what social means to Intel. She felt lucky that she was able to paint a blank canvas for a number of years and help lead Intel in the right direction. Back then, they tried to figure out the basics: Should they do it internally or outsource, what should they do, how should they build the strategies and what networks should they use? Back in 2009, her role was about looking at the community Intel had built. Since then, it's been about trying to dig deeper and engage in conversations. Ekaterina was managing Intel's community and engaging with fans. She spent a lot of time having conversations with fans, finding out who they were and what kind of content they wanted from Intel as a company. Over a number of years,

Basic SEO Tips

by Jonathan Hochman @ Hochman Consultants

Search engine optimization (SEO) is often sold as an expensive and time-consuming service, but many websites can easily improve their search engine results by following a few basic tips. The first thing to do is figure out your unique value…

The post Basic SEO Tips appeared first on Hochman Consultants.

Being Useful: New Marketing Techniques That Work

Being Useful: New Marketing Techniques That Work

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Are you wondering how your business can be more useful? Do you provide youtility? To learn about youtility and a new way of thinking when it comes to marketing, I interview Jay Baer for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Jay Baer, the founder of the award-winning blog Convince & Convert and co-author of The Now Revolution. His brand-new book is called Youtility: Why Smart Marketing Is About Help Not Hype. Jay shares the many different ways companies are already providing youtility to their customers. You'll learn the three categories of being useful and how to implement them into your business. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: New Marketing Techniques What's changing marketing that everybody needs to understand? Jay believes that marketing is harder than ever. With the incredible growth in the number of media outlets, it makes it very difficult to achieve top of mind awareness in the ways that we used to be able to do. Blogs and podcasts didn't exist before, but today they have huge audiences. Companies now have to compete for attention—not just against other companies, but against everybody and everything. Jay explains that if you take a look at your Facebook news feed, Twitter account or email inbox, you'll find a combination of both personal and professional relationships. Companies are competing for attention with consumers' friends and family members and are forced to use the same technologies to get on their radar. Since 1994, Jay has worked online and remembers how people freaked out when they bought advertising on the web for the first time. He says at the end of the day, all these things are almost free, but somebody has got to pay the free. The guys who pay the free are businesses. Listen to the show to find out what you need to do to succeed against everyone and everything. The story about @HiltonSuggests and what the take-home message is for marketers Jay talks about certain people who are an exception to the rule when it comes to being amazing. But he feels that most of us aren't amazing. So the best approach for us all is to be useful. You need to create youtility. Jay defines youtility in his book as marketing that is so useful, people would want to pay for it. Jay shares the story of Hilton Hotels' program called Hilton Suggests on Twitter and how the program came about. You'll hear a great example of how they helped a guy on Twitter who was looking for a vet in the area. They helped him when he needed it most, and this will probably lead to him booking a Hilton hotel in the future. Jay says the difference between helping and selling is just two letters, but in modern business those two letters make all the difference. At a recent conference, Jay heard Gary Vaynerchuk say, "Everybody wants to be a hunter, but nobody wants to be a farmer." Youtility is about long-term play. If you sell something, you make a customer today. But if you help someone, you can create a customer for life. You need to start to think about marketing, customer acquisition, loyalty and retention over a longer time horizon. You'll hear why Jay wishes that more businesses were less self-serving and more useful. Listen to the show to hear how Columbia Sportswear uses indirect marketing and provides youtility to their customers. What youtility is and what marketers need to understand Jay says you wouldn't necessarily charge for youtility because it's marketing...

What is the Purpose of SEO?

What is the Purpose of SEO?


Brick Marketing - SEO Marketing Solutions Company

The purpose of SEO, in a nutshell, is to make your website more appealing to the search engines and drive targeted visitors to your site.

Twitter Analytics: How to Know if Your Twitter Marketing Works

Twitter Analytics: How to Know if Your Twitter Marketing Works

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you review your Twitter Analytics? Want to use them to improve your Twitter marketing? Ian Cleary is with us to explore what you can learn from the data provided in Twitter Analytics. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Ian Cleary, a social tech expert. His blog, RazorSocial.com, placed in our Top 10 Social Media Blogs four years in a row. He also founded the RazorBlazers Club, a community for marketers who want to monetize with social media. Ian explores how you can use Twitter Analytics to take your Twitter marketing to the next level. You'll discover great third-party analytics tools. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Twitter Analytics Core Twitter Analytics on the Home Tab Ian explains that once your account is 14 days old, you can access the free analytics provided by Twitter by going to Analytics.Twitter.com on your desktop. You'll start off with an overview on the Home tab, from which you can drill down to view data on tweets, audiences, video analytics, and more. On the Overview screen, you'll see the total number of impressions for all of your tweets. Impressions are the actual number of people who saw your tweets on their Twitter timeline, by visiting your profile, or in a search. For instance, they may have clicked on a hashtag and your tweet was listed. Ian wonders whether Twitter is able to access all of the information for tweets displayed in third-party tools (Hootsuite, Sprout Social, etc.). He goes on to say that even though the data is never going to be 100% accurate, it will give you a gauge to see if your impressions are going up or down each month. Profile Visits is the total number of people who visited your profile on mobile and desktop combined. This number is important, Ian explains, because when you pin a really good tweet to the top of your Twitter profile, you have an idea of how many people have seen it. For example, if Ian's profile shows 17,000 visits, that means 17,000 people have seen his pinned tweet, which is an opt-in to download a lead generation guide. He uses this tweet to build email subscribers from people visiting his Twitter profile. It's a simple thing, but it's the equivalent of having a big opt-in at the top of your website. Mentions show how often your Twitter username is mentioned on other people's profiles. For example, the number of people who shared your content and mentioned your Twitter name will show up there. While they're not clickable, the mountain graphs you see under each data label give you an idea of whether that data set is increasing or decreasing at a glance. For example, you can see if your impressions are going up or down over the course of the month. Or you can check the Followers graph to see if your audience is growing or diminishing. The Top Tweet section of the Overview screen shows you your best tweet over the last 28 days and the number of impressions and retweets on it. Ian explains that you want to see what your most popular tweets are, so you can turn them into evergreen tweets to share regularly. There's no point in retweeting content that's not resonating with your audience. The Top Mention section shows you when someone else shared a piece of your content and mentioned your name, and it did really well. The Top Follower is your follower who is followed by the most people. If someone with a large following has followed you, and he or she is relevant to your audience, pay attention to and start interacting with that person, Ian suggests.

Word of Mouth: Getting Others to Talk About Your Business

Word of Mouth: Getting Others to Talk About Your Business

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you want more people to talk about your brand or business? Want to discover how to get the ball rolling? To learn about word-of-mouth marketing, I interview Ted Wright. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview word-of-mouth marketer Ted Wright, author of the book, Fizz: Harness the Power of Word of Mouth Marketing to Drive Brand Growth. He's also the founder of Fizz, an agency that specializes in word-of-mouth marketing. His clients include Intuit, Pabst Blue Ribbon, Verizon, Intel and many others. In this episode Ted will explore word-of-mouth marketing. You'll discover why word-of-mouth marketing is important in the age of social media, as well as things you can do to get people talking. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. How to subscribe/review on iPhone. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Word of Mouth How Ted became interested in word-of-mouth marketing Ted talks about when he attended the University of Chicago School of Business in 1999. At that time the computer lab was basically a windowless cave with 20 rows of 20 computers each, Ted recalls. Early one morning working in the lab, he noticed the ambient light was blue. It was because the Netscape screen was mostly blue, and that's the site everyone used. After 20 minutes or so of searching fruitlessly and getting frustrated with Netscape, somebody leaned over and suggested Ted try Google, which he did. Ted's test search term was his mother's name, Dr. Lynette Wright, a fairly famous medical geneticist. However, since they share the same last name as the guys who invented airplanes, most search engines easily got confused. "Google returned my mother as the second search term, instead of eight pages deep, which was the norm for other sites," Ted shares. He kept working and 20 minutes later, Ted noticed the guy next to him getting frustrated. So Ted leaned over and explained Google to him. About four or five hours later, Ted finished working, stood up, looked around and noticed the light in the room changed from the ambient blue of Netscape to the ambient white of the Google screen. Ted, who's always trying to figure out how things work, found that very interesting. So during his second year at the University of Chicago, he blew apart the history, math, psychology and epidemiology of word-of-mouth marketing. After graduation, Ted decided to start his own business. That company, which he started 15 years ago, is now called Fizz. Listen to the show to discover the unique way in which Ted watched TiVo and Google get adopted. The importance of word-of-mouth marketing Ted defines word-of-mouth marketing as "identifying your influencers and coming up with a story that is interesting, relevant and authentic that ladders back to qualities of your brand and then sharing that story as much as possible." That's the first part. The second part, Ted says, is "creating for your influencers as many opportunities as you can as a brand or a company for them if they feel like it to share your brand's story with as many people as they would like to do so." Ted shares the word-of-mouth marketing campaign he ran for Pabst Blue Ribbon (P.B.R.) with the brand manager at the time, Neal Stewart. The goal was to get more people in America to drink P.B.R. Ted identifies the three critical components of a story being shared: Is the story interesting to influencers so they will pick it up, study it and really understand it? Is it relevant to influencers' audiences? Is it authentic the way they currently understand the brand and the category in general?

Instagram Stories

by Sydney Banks @ Customer Magnetism

Your move Snapchat, Instagram just checked your King. You’ve probably been enjoying Instagram’s newest feature these past few weeks: Instagram Stories. Seem familiar? That’s because it bears a strong resemblance to the well-known Snapchat Stories. And by strong resemblance, I mean... Read more »

How to Host and Promote a Twitter Chat

How to Host and Promote a Twitter Chat

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you use Twitter to market your business? Have you thought about hosting chats? Twitter chats are a great way to connect with customers and prospects, build authority and gain exposure for your business. In this article you'll discover how to prepare, promote and host a Twitter chat. Listen to this article: #1: Define the Objective Always start by defining the objective of your Twitter chat. Find a topic that will appeal to your target audience. The chat needs to provide value to your audience to be successful. Don't make it just about your company; tailor it to how you can help your community. For example, if you're in the photography industry, invite guests to discuss photo editing tips, black-and-white photography, photography inspiration, etc. An added benefit is that you can repurpose all of the chat contributions into a future blog post. Those who participated in the chat will appreciate having a summary of it, and readers who missed it will enjoy the insight. #2: Identify Similar Chats Once you've established an objective for your chat, find at least five Twitter chats similar to yours to gather ideas. You can find Twitter chats with tools like TweetReports and Gnosisarts. Learn how these chats work. Observe how the host controls the flow of conversation and directs topics. Also find out which guests are invited, how many questions are posed, what times the chats are held and how they're promoted. Be sure to participate as well. Answer questions and engage with others. This allows you to build your expertise and gives you insight into what it's like to participate in a Twitter chat. #3: Set the Date and Time Choosing the date and time for your chat is important. Typically the best times to hold Twitter chats are between the hours of 6 pm ET and 10 pm ET. However, avoid scheduling your chat at a time that would clash with other popular chats. Write down the times that you won't be able to hold a chat. Next, list the scheduled times for the five Twitter chats that you followed earlier. Then search for a time slot that won't clash with them. #4: Choose a Hashtag Now comes the fun part: naming your Twitter chat. Typically every chat hashtag ends with "chat" (for example, #mediachat, #influencerchat and #blogchat). Adding the word "chat" signals to people that it's a Twitter chat instead of a regular hashtag or an event. When choosing a hashtag, make sure it fits your brand. Also, check that it's not a Twitter username and hasn't been used as a hashtag previously. Brainstorm at least 15 chat names and then pick the best one. You might want to seek input from your co-workers. After you select a hashtag, make sure that you register the Twitter username. You can use this account to hold your chats. #5: Invite Guests Next, make a list of at least 20 guests you want to invite. Start securing guests at least two weeks prior to your chat. If it's your first Twitter chat, make sure you have a commitment from at least four guests a month in advance. Guests are often busy, so you need to secure them in advance. Ideally, you want someone who has experience being a guest and is interested in holding Twitter chats. If you have an influential user who loves your company, consider inviting that person to be a guest, too. #6: Prepare Questions Once you have everything in place and have secured at least four guests in advance, start preparing questions. You'll need about 7 to 10 questions for your guests. Send these questions to them at least 72 hours prior to the chat so they can prepare their responses. During the chat, spread out the questions about 6 to 8 minutes apart. Ask your last question about 10 minutes before the end of the chat to allow time for the community to discuss it. #7: Promote the Chat The key to making your Twitter chat stand out is to promote it. Here are some ways to do that: Partner With Other Chats

Measuring Social Media: How to Determine Your ROI

Measuring Social Media: How to Determine Your ROI

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Are you trying to measure your social media return on investment (ROI)? Do you need to measure the social performance of your business? To learn how to determine the ROI for social media marketing, I interview Nichole Kelly for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Nichole Kelly, author of How to Measure Social Media and the CEO of Social Media Explorer and SME Digital. Nichole shares why so many businesses struggle to determine the ROI of their social media activities and what's really important in your social media measurement. You'll learn the most important steps that all marketers should take when thinking about social ROI. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Social Media Return on Investment (ROI) Why so many marketers struggle with measuring social ROI Nichole believes one of the reasons social ROI is a challenge is because marketers have redefined the metrics used to measure social media. Words such as mentions and retweets are similar to what was measured before. But now people have decided that social media is special, and therefore needs to be measured in a special way. Nichole believes this has set us up for failure. When you try to 1) justify what you are doing and 2) measure the return, you can't compare these two things. It then becomes difficult to compare and optimize whatever the return is. People have played with the return on investment phrase in the social realm. For example, you've likely heard of return on influence, return on engagement and return on conversation. The problem with this approach is that at the end of the day, ROI is a financial return. And whether it is the best measure for success of social media doesn't really matter, because it's the measure of success for business. Listen to the show to find out why you need to translate social media into a positive ROI. The backstory that led Nichole to social media ROI Nichole explains how she spent most of her career in corporate marketing and grew up in the boardroom. In June 2011, there was a study that came out from the Fournaise Report that said 73% of CEOs think marketers lack business credibility. The #1 stated reason was because we talk about trends like social media. Whether you agree with this or not, Nichole noticed that marketers were caught in a trap of trying to measure social media differently. And measuring social media ROI isn't as hard as everyone was making it out to be. So she set out to provide how-to information with step-by-step instructions on translating social media into something that can be compared across channels. Nichole wrote ROI-related articles for Social Media Examiner and discovered there was a never-ending appetite for help figuring out social media ROI. Nichole thinks people are still trying to understand it completely, but they are actually ready to measure now. When Nichole first started, a lot of people were talking about measurement in philosophical terms. We are starting to see companies, and marketers in particular, understand that with social media, it doesn't matter how many fans or followers they have. At the end of the day, if you can compare social media to what you spend on pay-per-click advertising and start measuring it with something simple like cost per click on all of the web traffic you are sending to your site, you have something that justifies a budget. Listen to the show to find out why Nichole feels measuring social media...

Starting an Online Show: How to Quickly Grow Your Platform

Starting an Online Show: How to Quickly Grow Your Platform

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Have you ever dreamed of having your own show? Do you want to know how to get started? There is no easier way to build a platform quickly. To learn more about what goes into starting your own show, this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast goes deep on the subject. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, you'll learn the different formats involved in both audio and video shows and the key ingredients you must have to make it a success. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Create Your Own Online Show There are some amazing talk show hosts who do incredible things by simply talking to other people. Think about Jay Leno, Howard Stern, Dr. Phil, Ellen DeGeneres and Oprah Winfrey. Oprah Winfrey started out with a half-hour, low-rated talk show in Chicago, and look at her now. The secret to her success is interviewing people. In the social media world, the big name that comes to mind is Gary Vaynerchuk. He became famous for Wine Library TV. He sat behind a camera in his wine library store and he talked about wine. He also had interesting guests who talked to him about wine. Gary has a really cool personality, which led to incredible opportunities for him. As a result of him simply talking about wine, he got a $1 million book contract. If you think of the podcasters you listen to regularly, many of them have shows where there is more than one person and there is dialogue going back and forth. The secret source of everything I've ever done is interviews. Interviews have been the key to Social Media Examiner's growth. When I launched Social Media Examiner in October 2009, I took my friend Jeff, who's a video guy, to BlogWorld. And when I went to a MarketingProfs conference in Chicago, I took my flip camera and interviewed people. I got behind the camera and talked to the likes of Chris Brogan, Steve Rubel, Jessie Stay and a lot of other people for about 10 minutes each. These interviews catapulted Social Media Examiner to incredible success. Interviews weren't the reason for all the success, but they were extremely instrumental. Listen to the show to find out why interviews are one of the reasons for Social Media Examiner's success. My backstory  I never liked reading books in college, so to be able to pass tests, I had to arrange study groups with some of the smartest kids in class. By hosting the study group, I would learn enough to be able to ask questions to get the dialogue going. From this experience, I discovered that I could learn something by interviewing people in my group. These techniques led to my future success. One of my first companies was Stelzner Consulting. I was a writer for high-tech companies, where I interviewed engineers on the factory floors. It was my job to write materials to help the organization sell. Before Social Media Examiner, I was known for writing white papers and I did a lot of teaching. In the early 2000s, I ran teleclasses, where 100-200 people would pay $39 to $59 to listen to me on the phone interviewing experts every month. Listen to the show to learn how you could become the next Gary Vaynerchuk or Oprah Winfrey. The benefits of having a show When you start interviewing successful people, other people look at you and think "WOW! That person who is doing the interviewing must be really smart." A great example is Derek Halpern of Social Triggers, who goes out of his way to reach out to scientists who do really interesting psychological research.

Social Sharing: How to Get More People to Share Your Content

Social Sharing: How to Get More People to Share Your Content

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you publish content online? Want more people to share your content? To learn how to get more people to share your content, I interview Mark Schaefer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Mark Schaefer, author of The Tao of Twitter and Social Media Explained. His blog Grow was awarded #2 on our top 10 blogs of 2015. Mark also co-hosts the Marketing Companion podcast. His latest book is called The Content Code: Six Essential Strategies for Igniting Your Content, Your Marketing, and Your Business. In this episode Mark will explore why people share via social media. You'll discover what you can do to improve your chances that people will share your content. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. How to subscribe/review on iPhone. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Social Sharing How Mark got into content and blogging Around 2008, Mark started his own business doing consulting and teaching. He realized if he was going to talk about Twitter, blogging and Facebook, he had to use them. So he started a blog as an experiment. It took him about 9 months to find his voice, Mark recalls. It dawned on him that all of his contacts and business were coming through his blog, so he needed to pay attention to it. The blog really started kicking in around 2010, and has been building ever since. The turning point happened when Mark started to write posts that were more authentic and had personality. Instead of finding his audience, Mark's audience found him. Mark tells new bloggers "To stand out, you need to be original. And to be original, you need to have the courage to tell your own story and have your own voice." In 2009 Mark wrote a post that was a little bit controversial, called The Social Media Country Club. As a new blogger, Mark felt like an outsider. He says it seemed like all of the influential bloggers were in this club, where they never said anything negative about each other. Mark was thinking, "How are we going to grow if we don't challenge each other?" Coming from 27 years of marketing experience, Mark expected any channel used for business to be measurable, while others felt it was all about the conversation. Though nervous, Mark started speaking his mind. The reaction was supportive and positive. His audience was grateful somebody finally said it. Listen to the show to discover what Mark blogged about at first and how he felt about it. Why marketing with content is so difficult today Whether you're an individual blogger, working in a business or working for a brand, many niches are getting crowded with content and social media activity. This makes it very difficult to compete. Mark feels this was predictable. He says when the Internet first started, everyone needed a website. If you were the first one with a website, you had an advantage. Then you needed to be found. If you were the first one to figure out search engine optimization, you had an advantage, because you're going to be at the top of the search rankings. However, after your competitors figured it out, it got harder and more expensive to be in marketing. He says it's the same thing with blogging. It's hard to be seen, because people are figuring it out. People are trying to stand out, but creating more or better content isn't necessarily the answer. For the last year, Mark has been obsessed with figuring out how to maneuver in this very crowded world. And that's why he wrote The Content Code. Listen to the show to hear my Times Square analogy. Mark's code for success Mark explains how all conversations are about content: creating more,

How to Curate a Roundup Blog Post of Industry Influencers

How to Curate a Roundup Blog Post of Industry Influencers

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want more exposure for your blog? Have you tried curating articles written by influencers? Roundup posts help you gain the attention of influencers who can increase the reach of your content. In this article I'll share five steps to creating a curated blog post. Listen to this article: #1: Choose a Topic To select a subject for your post, start by researching popular topics covered by your competitors. Make a list of three to five individuals or companies that share your area of expertise. Then, go to Buzzsumo.com, type in the name or URL for each competitor and click search. The results let you see their most successful articles. For example, a search of Social Media Examiner shows two of their most successful posts are about tools. After you search a few more companies, identify a common topic you want to feature in a curated post. #2: Identify Influencers to Feature After you choose your subject, strategically target experts to feature in the blog post. First, go over to Followerwonk, click on Search Bios and enter your topic keyword. This free tool lets you see the most influential Twitter users relative to your topic or keyword. Next, click the Social Authority tab to sort your list by who has the most influence. Ideally you want to target individuals with high authority and a large number of followers. I suggest individuals rather than companies, since people tend to be more responsive. For instance, on the topic of social media tools Ian Cleary has a high social authority and a large Twitter following. Finally, go back to Buzzsumo. This time, run a search for your topic. This is how you find the most popular blogs and authors on the subject. Compile a list of 5 to 15 of these influencers, including their blog URL, and move on to the next step. #3: Select Articles to Include Once you know which influencers to target, you need to find the most popular content they've published on your topic. Paste each influencer's blog URL into Buzzsumo search and look for a popular article that relates to the subject of your article. If you cannot find any relevant content from the author, don't panic. Type the topic keywords after the URL and search again. Make sure you read all of the articles (you may even want to make notes for later) and gather a nice cross-section of articles without any overlap. You're curating content from these influencers to share with your audience, so you want to create as valuable an article as possible. When you're done researching, choose one article written by each influencer on your list to feature in your roundup post. #4: Write a Roundup Blog Post Now it's time to construct your roundup blog post. Use the following blog post structure to increase the likelihood of getting shares from the influencers you mention. Headline & Introduction Start with a strong headline to drive clicks to your blog. Here are some headline formulas you can adapt for your roundup: X Most Popular [TOPIC] Posts From the Pros in [MONTH/YEAR] X Most Popular [TOPIC] Posts From [JOB TITLE] in [MONTH/YEAR] X Most Popular [TOPIC] Posts That Will [DESIRED RESULT] X Most Popular [TOPIC] Posts That Will [DESIRED RESULT] in [DESIRED TIME] Next, tell your readers what they will learn from your article. Keep the introduction short, punchy and to the point. Featured Blog Mention Title and Rank: Start with the numbered position of the article (#1, #2, #3, etc.). Then add the original post title and the amount of shares it received. Images: Gather and insert the logo, an eye-catching image of the header from the featured blog and a screen grab of the Buzzsumo share count for the original blog post. Attribution: It's essential to fully credit the website that posted the original article and cite the author. For example: Original Article: 7 Strategies for Growing Your Community Blog (ProBlogger).

Pinterest Success: Creative Ways to Use Pinterest for Your Business

Pinterest Success: Creative Ways to Use Pinterest for Your Business

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use Pinterest for business? Are you wondering how your business can benefit from Pinterest? To learn some creative ways to use Pinterest to help your business, I interview Cynthia Sanchez for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Cynthia Sanchez, host of the Oh So Pinteresting Podcast. She freely admits that she's addicted to Pinterest. It's changed her life in a major way and now she helps other businesses figure out how to tap into this growing network. Cynthia shares how you can use Pinterest for market research and how to get your content seen by more people. You'll learn about some of the most popular trends on Pinterest and how to create attention-grabbing images. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Pinterest for Business How did Pinterest grab you? When Cynthia was practicing as an oncology nurse, part of her work was to develop a program called Navigation. The role involved a lot of teaching and reaching out. At the end of 2011, she joined Pinterest to find information not only for herself, but also her patients. It started to take over her life unlike any other social media platform. She had the entrepreneurial spirit, but in the medical world, the opportunities are very limited. In February 2012, Cynthia launched her blog Oh So Pinteresting. It evolved from personal use to more business use. A local company noticed she knew a lot about Pinterest and approached her for help. The business grew from there and she said goodbye to the nursing world. The reason Cynthia started with a blog first was because it seemed less technologically daunting. She used WordPress for her self-hosted site. The podcast started a year later when the time seemed right. You'll discover what type of people Cynthia interviews for her podcast and the areas discussed, with Pinterest being such a visual platform. Listen to the show to find out the reaction to Cynthia's blog at the New Media Expo. How people use Pinterest for market research Cynthia says there are a lot of ways you can use Pinterest for market research. If you already have a presence on Pinterest, take a look at the people who follow your account. You can click on the number of followers you have to see a list pop up with all of the people who follow you. From this, you'll see if you have a predominant age group or gender following you. You have to remember that Pinterest is an international type of service. When you click through your followers, you can see the other boards they're following. You'll find out what you can learn when you click through and how this can help you with some ideas for your business. There are a few other things to look out for within a Pinterest account, which include people's location and if they link up to their other social networks. You'll learn what benefits there are to people having their Twitter account linked to their Pinterest account. Cynthia shares the benefits of a free analytic service called PinLeague. The difference with PinLeague and Pinterest's own analytics service is that you can see who your most influential followers are. You'll learn what you can gain when you dig deep into their accounts. Listen to the show to find out other ways you can check out your competitors and how it can help guide your Pinterest activity. Some of the more popular trends on Pinterest Cynthia believes that the most important thing overall,

Twitter Marketing: How to Succeed on Twitter

Twitter Marketing: How to Succeed on Twitter

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use Twitter for your business? Are you wondering how to get more out of your Twitter marketing? To learn how to successfully market your business using Twitter, I interview Mark Schaefer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Mark Schaefer, the author of The Tao of Twitter, Return on Influence and co-author of Born to Blog. He's a college educator, blogger, consultant and speaker. This is his third appearance on this show! Mark explores what you need to know about using Twitter for your business. You'll discover the path to Twitter success, how to utilize everything Twitter has to offer to market your business, and manage your followers and lists. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Twitter Marketing How Mark got started with Twitter  Mark believes that you really need to immerse yourself in the social web in order to truly understand it, or be successful as a consultant or teacher. Mark immersed himself in Twitter 7 years ago, when he started his own consulting business and started to teach. Mark admits that he was not an early fan of Twitter. It took him months to figure out that this platform was more than just the advertising, technology, mentions or hashtags. Once he understood the powerful human aspect behind Twitter, it changed his life and he wanted others to understand it too. Mark calls Twitter the greatest networking tool ever created. Many of the connections he's made around the world would not have been possible without Twitter and his blog. Listen to the show to discover more about Twitter's powerful ability to connect you with potential clients and opportunities.  The three elements of the Tao of Twitter Mark identifies tao as the Chinese word meaning path. He explains that there is a certain path to success. Behind every Twitter success story, perhaps behind every social media success story, there are 3 essential elements to this path: meaningful content, a targeted audience, and authentic helpfulness. You'll hear Mark discuss each of these three elements in detail and how they work to create meaningful connections for your business when you use Twitter. According to Mark, there is no better way across any social media platform to create an audience than Twitter. It offers so many ways to find the right people for your business. Listen to the show to discover how these three elements work together to lead to success on Twitter.  How businesses can use Twitter  In The Tao of Twitter, there is a chapter called "25 Ideas to Toast Your Competition". Mark offers a few examples of this in the show. He thinks that Twitter is under utilized by businesses today, yet it has the power to transform your business. For instance, Twitter search can be the most powerful source of marketing research available to you. It offers users the ability to target an audience down to a specific zip code, sentiment, or keyword. Twitter's Advanced Search allows you to find potential clients, conduct competitive research, track trends, or provide customer service, all in real-time. Mark explores the benefits of paid promotions and ads on Twitter. According to Mark, this is a great time to try Twitter advertising. The inventory is high and the cost is relatively inexpensive at the moment, but Mark projects that this may not be case for long, as more people learn to leverage this opportunity. Listen to the show to discover a little known trick that makes Twitter advertising especially attractive to marketers.  Broadcast content versus being helpful

Promoted Pins: How to Advertise on Pinterest

Promoted Pins: How to Advertise on Pinterest

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use Pinterest promoted pins? Want to discover how they work? To explore everything you need to know about promoted pins on Pinterest, I interview Vincent Ng. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Vincent Ng, president of MCNG Marketing and author of Pinterest to Profits with Pintalysis. Vincent helps businesses succeed with Pinterest marketing and visual social media. Vincent explores Pinterest promoted pins. You'll discover what's new with promoted pins. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Promoted Pins At a basic level, Vincent says, promoted pins are Pinterest advertising. As you scroll through your Pinterest feed and see "Promoted by" on a pin, that means it's advertising. He notes that any pin you want to promote must be a public pin, and says you can even promote something you've repinned! What's New With Promoted Pins? Pinterest recently announced promoted video pins, which, at the moment, are specifically for users on mobile. These pins show an animated GIF and lead you to a full video when you click on them. What's really cool, Vincent shares, is that you can put up to six additional pins below the video on your promoted pin for no extra cost. The six additional pins display like a carousel under the video, and you can use them to promote the product in the video or share additional information about it. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufVJ3oqpQQ8 While video pins currently send users to third-party players like YouTube to view the video promoted in the pin, Pinterest is working on its own native video player, which will be rolled out to everybody soon. Once available, people will be able to upload videos directly to Pinterest. Listen to the show to hear what video lengths Vincent has seen on Pinterest. What Can You Do With Promoted Pins? Vincent says you can reach a large audience with promoted pins, and that Pinterest allows you to create ad campaigns based on three main business goals: awareness, engagement, and traffic. Brand awareness campaigns let you promote your pin to an audience and you pay based on a thousand impressions. With engagement campaigns, you're charged every time someone taps and enlarges your pin, repins your pin, saves your pin, or clicks your pin. During traffic campaigns, you pay for every click-through on your pin. Vincent says the great thing about promoted pins is that you pay only for the direct promotion, meaning that if a user clicks on someone's share of your promoted pin, that click is free for you. In fact, Pinterest says users get an average of 30% free engagement when they conduct promoted pin campaigns. Which type of campaign is the most cost-effective? Vincent says that he agrees with Pinterest peers Alisa Meredith and Jeff Sieh, who both find the cost-per-click campaigns offer the best bang for your buck versus engagement campaigns. Why? About 80% of Pinterest users access the app on mobile, so they'll enlarge your pin to get a better look at your product. If it's not what they want, they don't necessarily click through. Vincent says it's also possible to run split tests with promoted pins because each campaign type provides the same level of metrics. After you run your test, go to your advertising dashboard and export the data to see which campaign type is a more cost-effective option for your business Pinterest also offers promoted pin users robust targeting capabilities, Vincent says, including by keywords and interests. Pinterest users are asked to follow five interests when they sign up,

Google Panda Update & Penguin MK2

by Gary @ Hacked By 0x1999 - Indonesian Code Party - Jatim4u

Internet content is becoming a trickier force to deal with. The number of websites, blogs, and links all over the web make it difficult to sift through and gain accurate information on the subjects you are after. Content generating companies …

Google Panda Update & Penguin MK2 was originally posted on the Phoenixrealm SEO Blog by Gary Cottam.

You can connect with Gary on Google+, on Twitter @garycottam, or follow these links to find out more about Doublespark SEO or Doublespark Web Design.

Facebook Branded Content: What Marketers Need to Know

Facebook Branded Content: What Marketers Need to Know

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Looking for ways to partner with influencers on Facebook? Have you heard of branded content on Facebook? Facebook's Branded Content feature allows media outlets, celebrities, and influencers to tag content that includes a third party, brand, or sponsor. In this post you'll discover how Facebook's Branded Content feature works for publishers and marketers. Listen to this article: Who Can Create Branded Content? Branded content is currently limited to media outlets, celebrities, and influencers with verified pages, indicated by the blue checkmark icon next to their name. For example, the interest result for "Cats" above is not a verified page, but the other three results are. Hence, to create branded content, be on the lookout for pages with the blue verified icon when you search for media, celebrities, and influencers. What Does Branded Content Look Like? Branded content can be a photo, video, link, text, instant article, or 360 video at launch. In a couple of weeks, live video will also be available to use as branded content. When a verified page shares branded content, it looks like this. The post itself looks normal. What makes it branded content is the "with" tag next to the name of the media outlet, celebrity, or influencer that posted about you. When people share an update you're tagged in, your name goes wherever the verified page owner's name goes. This gives you increased exposure, which could turn into new fans for your page. What's the Real Difference With Branded Content? The main benefit of branded content over page mentions is that your page and the verified page that published the post will get performance insights. In the following example, Social Media Examiner is the verified page and Kristi Hines is the page that has been tagged in a Branded Content post. First, if your page is tagged, you'll get a notification that a verified page has tagged your page in branded content. Look for these as you would for typical notifications. Also look for a notification within your page's Notifications section. Clicking on either of these will lead you to your page's insights, specifically for Branded Content posts. Here, you can monitor a post's organic or paid engagement. You'll get most of the same insights with branded content as you would your own posts, even though it wasn't made on your page. You can sort the post's analytics by organic versus paid and fans versus non-fans. You can also break down the types of engagement the post received. You can click on the link to see the full breakdown of analytics data for the post. You can also use the Share and Boost button to share the branded content to your page and boost it to your page's audience or an audience of your choosing. Now, you can know instantly how well a particular media outlet, celebrity, or influencer delivers exposure for you. If you have multiple media outlets, celebrities, and influencers promoting your campaign, you can see which ones are giving you the greatest visibility with a variety of Facebook metrics. How Do Verified Pages Brand Content? Media outlets, celebrities, and influencers can easily brand their content using the new Handshake icon. It's located in the status box when they begin a post for their page, and is accessible from their desktop browser, the main Facebook iOS app (excluding Business Manager), Power Editor, Ads Manager, the Marketing API, and the Mentions app on iOS. Android support is coming soon. On the desktop, when they click on the status box, it will look like this. When you click on the handshake icon, the verified page receives a notification about what you, the marketer, will see about the post. Note that verified pages can tag more than one third party, brand, or sponsor for each post. (In addition, note that none of the brands shown or mentioned have in any way asked for or paid for sponsorshi...

How to Use Long Tail Pro Word Count to Discover Audience Needs and Wants

by Long Tail Pro Team @ LongtailPro

As you know by now, crafting great content is the core of any strategy aiming to get more relevant traffic. The ultimate goal of content optimization is to rank on page one. Keyword research is the first step in this process. However, creating great content on a topic nobody is interested in does not help. […]

The post How to Use Long Tail Pro Word Count to Discover Audience Needs and Wants appeared first on LongtailPro.

3 Reasons Your AdWords Traffic Is Not Qualified

by Today's Industry Insider @ The Kissmetrics Marketing Blog

AdWords is one of the most predictable paid media channels. By using it, you’re focusing on people who show their intent in advertising platforms. Search traffic is growing by a lot. In 2014, marketers spent $23.44 billion in the search channel. That same figure for this year is already $32.32 billion, and it’s expected to […]

Google+ Marketing: Why Marketers Should Not Overlook Google+

Google+ Marketing: Why Marketers Should Not Overlook Google+

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Have you given up on Google+? Are you wondering whether it is worth managing yet another social network? To address some of the benefits and misconceptions of Google+ marketing, I interview Jesse Stay for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Jesse Stay, author of several books including Google+ for Dummies and Google+ Marketing for Dummies. Jesse shares insights into Google's strategy and what this means for your business. You'll learn what's critical for a successful approach to your Google+ marketing and why Google+ may be essential to your business even if you don't think so now. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Google+ for Marketers Here are some interesting Google+ stats: 250 million Google+ accounts, 150+ million active users, 50% sign on daily (Google I/O 2012 conference) 69.4% male (Google+ Social Statistics) Most Google+ users are mobile, not desktop users (The Google+ Developers Blog) Jesse explains why you cannot compare Google+ to Facebook and why he thinks Google+ is more comparable to Twitter. You'll learn why Google+ is more than a destination site. Find out how the Google+ platform is intended to be a layer on top of all other Google products and how Google+ is becoming integrated into the entire Google experience. Listen to the show to find out why Google+ is the glue that connects all Google products together socially. How Google+ can help you Jesse explains why you first need to look at your Googlestrategy to figure out how your business can use Google+ best.  For example, your Google+ marketing can help you to: Improve your search results in Google Bring social connections into your YouTube videos Add a CRM experience into Gmail and Google Calendar Build connections through Google Hangouts When you establish a presence on Google+, build relationships there and get endorsements on the content that you share through Google+, you increase your Google search ranking. Listen to the show to learn how your Google+ marketing improves your Google strategy. The future of Google+  Jesse talks about how Google has proven rumors wrong. Google+ recently released new capabilities for notifications on the Google+ platform. Plus Google+ also has a much stronger integration into Google Apps and you're now able to restrict conversations from sharing outside of the domain. This gives Google+ more privacy and makes it more friendly for business use. Google+ is continuing to grow and add more features. Jesse shares how Google+ can help you gain an edge in Google search engine results. He explains why there is no easier way to get better ranking in search at the moment than by building a Google+ presence. Learn how to give authority to the content that Google is indexing within Google  search results. Listen to the show to find out more about the future of Google+ and what this means to you and your business. Google+ marketing tools  At this time, most third-party social media tools do not integrate with the Google+ API. This can make it challenging for busy marketers to add yet another social media network to their marketing mix. Jesse says to have patience and anticipates they will be releasing APIs at some time. You'll hear about Webmaster Tools where you can find, for example, statistics to help you track how your content is affected within search results as a result of people liking it on Google+.

How to Curate Your Social Content With Reddit

How to Curate Your Social Content With Reddit

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you looking for new content to share to your fans and followers? Have you considered Reddit as a source for valuable content? Using Reddit will reveal unique and interesting content that helps you stand out from the crowd. In this post you'll discover how to use Reddit for content curation and inspiration. Listen to this article: #1: Find Subreddits in Your Niche Many marketers already know Reddit is useful for discovering content, but browsing its individual communities, called subreddits, can be time-consuming. Fortunately, you can make that task easier if you create a multireddit, which is a custom dashboard of content around a particular topic. First, you need to find subreddits you want to include in your multireddit, and compile a master list of subreddit names, organized by topic. Discover Relevant Subreddits There are thousands of active subreddits, so it's important to find those that share the best content in your niche. Here are some easy ways to search for relevant subreddits: The subreddit search box lets you search for all subreddits related to a keyword (for example, fitness). Use the Reddit site search to find site-wide mentions of your keyword, plus a list of subreddits where the term appears most frequently. You can use advanced search operators to focus your search. You can also combine advanced operators. For example, I did a search for posts with "paleo" in the title on the r/xxfitness subreddit. I then sorted the results by New to see the most recent posts. To perform granular searches, use the Boolean operators AND, OR and NOT (or the minus symbol). You can also group keywords with parentheses. Along with search features on Reddit, you can use metareddit to find subreddits. This third-party directory allows you to filter results by number of subscribers and last post, as in the example here. The results are displayed in a word cloud, where the size of the words correlates to the number of subscribers. Make a List of Subreddits To keep track of the subreddits you find, create a spreadsheet of subreddit names organized by topic. As you find subreddits you want to add to your multireddit, note the subreddit's name after the r/ in its URL (for example, http://www.reddit.com/r/HealthyFood). Here's a list you might create for health and fitness subreddits. #2: Create a Multireddit Once you've found a group of relevant subreddits, organize them as a multireddit. You can include all of the subreddits you found in one big multireddit or create a handful of more specific multireddits. After you log into the site, go to the Reddit front page, and click on the dotted line on the left side. Click the Create button, and type in a name for your multireddit. (Note that you can't use spaces or symbols in the multireddit name.) When you're finished, click Create again. Now that you've created your multireddit, you can begin adding subreddits to it in the upper-right corner of the screen. Type a subreddit name into the Add Subreddit box and click the plus sign (or press Enter) to add it to your multireddit. You can also add a description for the multireddit and choose whether it's public (other redditors can find it) or private (only you can view it). Open the sidebar from the front page to access any multireddits you've created. You can filter the content in your multireddit using the tabs at the top of the page: Hot: Posts that receive the highest engagement (upvotes/comments) New: The most recent posts Rising: Posts that are gaining popularity Controversial: Posts that receive an equal mix of upvotes and downvotes Top: The most popular posts of all time Gilded: Posts that received reddit gold Promoted: Sponsored content You can also search for keywords within your multireddit. For example, if you're looking for healthy recipes to share on your social channels,

How Do You Search Online?

by Vicky Simpson @ Customer Magnetism

It’s something that we almost take for granted – when we search for something online, we expect to find the results immediately. However, the way that I search can drastically differ than how my co-worker, Sydney searches or even how... Read more »

How to Write SEO Friendly Content

How to Write SEO Friendly Content


ThoughtCo

Tips and best practices for writing website content that appeals to search engines but is also enjoyable to read for human visitors and customers.

How to Grow a Business Using YouTube

How to Grow a Business Using YouTube

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you want to use YouTube for business? Want to learn how to script and produce YouTube videos for your business? To find out how marketers can develop a business channel on YouTube, I interview Sunny Lenarduzzi. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Sunny Lenarduzzi, a video marketing expert. Previously she was a TV news reporter and the host of the Social Update from Hootsuite. Now she produces regular videos focused on social media, creates online courses, and helps her clients find success with YouTube. Sunny Lenarduzzi shares insights from creating her own business on YouTube. You'll discover how to use social media to drive traffic to your YouTube channel. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Grow a Business With YouTube Sunny's Story Sunny has a background in traditional media (broadcasting, television, and radio), but fell in love with social media in the early days of Facebook and Twitter. She started an online magazine and after building the brand organically using YouTube and other social media platforms, she ended up with a social media consulting business. When Sunny noticed she was routinely getting the same questions from her clients (such as how to build a Twitter following or how to use Instagram video), she started using YouTube FAQ to record and send the answers to clients. Her first video tutorial now has almost 80,000 views. Today, her channel (started in March 2015) has amassed over 60,000 subscribers and 3.8 million video views. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9D7qmseGz6o Listen to the show to learn more about how Sunny came to partner with Hootsuite on the Social Update. The Path Between YouTube Videos and Business It's all the about email addresses. The biggest thing to remember, Sunny says, is that YouTube is a social media platform. She reminds listeners that social media algorithms change and you can't always rely on social media reach to get your message out. That's where an email list comes in, and she notes that YouTube is vital to growing your email list. For example, Sunny created a tutorial on How to Get More Views on YouTube, in which she offers a free YouTube SEO checklist. Every week, she gains about 200 email subscribers from that one video. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LokwDpM1wnc Sunny explains the importance of helping your videos rank on page one of Google and YouTube search, and shares that the first 24 hours of a video's life are vital in determining where the video will rank. For this reason, when she has a new video, she spends that first day driving people directly to the video on YouTube. Sunny credits getting ranked on the first page of Google or YouTube search results with the growth of her business over the past year. People found her videos when they were searching for help on certain topics such as how to use Snapchat, Twitter, YouTube, etc. Answering questions related to these topics introduces her to potentially thousands of new people a day, and capturing the email addresses of those people grows her potential customer database. Sunny shares that she uses a customized Leadpages link, designed in the same branding as her website, to collect her leads. Sunny says to create your freebie based on what you eventually want to sell. Make it a guide, a checklist, or an ebook. If writing isn't your strong suit, there are other options to use for the freebie, such as audio training or short video courses. For example, Kimra Luna offers a two-day video mini-series for her Rock-It With Webinars.

3 Steps for Adding Video to Your Social Media Marketing

3 Steps for Adding Video to Your Social Media Marketing

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Is video part of your social media marketing mix? Looking for tips to get started with video? Making the right decisions in three key areas will help you create videos that engage people. In this article you'll discover three steps to add video to your social media marketing. Listen to this article: #1: Choose a Video Type The great thing about social media is that you can create many different types of videos to keep your publishing schedule interesting and your followers engaged. Eighty-eight percent of businesses say that video is an important part of their marketing strategy. However, the biggest struggles are to stop recycling old content and choose the right type of video content. Here are five ways that you can include video in your social media marketing. Grab Attention With Pre-roll Video Pre-roll video ads are short 15- to 30-second videos that grab the viewer's interest in a product or service. You can use them on social media sites such as YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. The secret to a successful pre-roll video is to gain the viewer's attention quickly, as most people naturally gravitate towards the Skip button or scroll past videos on their news feed. This pre-roll video from Geico pulls the viewer in by showing a runaway vacuum. Use humorous tactics like this to make your video stand out in the news feed and compel viewers to watch the whole thing. (Editorial Note: This video was removed from public view after this article published.) httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xmzm1JCOqtU Show Viewers How to Do Something One way to produce highly targeted content is to teach your audience how to do something. This helps you improve shares and attract new followers. Fitness trainer Kayla Itsines regularly produces videos that teach her target audience how to do various fitness moves. Content like this has helped her become an influencer in the fitness industry, gaining her 4.4 million followers on Instagram. Her videos are easy to follow and they feature content that people would normally expect to pay money to see. http://www.instagram.com/p/_XYsJfACNp/ "How to" video searches on YouTube are up to 70%, with over 100 million hours watched on the platform. Problem-solving content is valuable and video is one of the best ways to offer it. Capitalize on Trending Topics Marketers are always hoping to create the next viral video, but with so much competition, it's not as easy as it sounds. That's why it's important to take advantage of the trending topics across social platforms. The Trending Topics sections on both Twitter and Facebook are popular sources of news content for social users. If you create a video related to a trending topic, you can potentially tap into a huge market. Jimmy Fallon created an a cappella video to celebrate the new Star Wars movie. Creating content around a popular event helped this video to secure millions of shares across social media. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTLAx3VDX7g Take a look at the events likely to create a buzz during the calendar year and incorporate these into your video marketing strategy. Go Behind the Scenes Showing people what goes on behind the scenes at your company is a great way to connect with your audience on a personal level. It helps close the gap between brand and customer, which is important in the world of marketing. In this video, Ben and Jerry's introduces one of their Flavor Gurus and gives viewers a brief look at what goes into creating their products and what it's like to work for the company. http://www.instagram.com/p/39m2aMRkLn/ Showcase Products When it comes to video content, 76% of consumers say that they would share a video if it's entertaining. When you incorporate a product video into your social strategy, it's important to strike a balance between promoting your product and keeping the tone light, fun and informal.

How to Use Facebook Audience Overlap to Improve Your Facebook Marketing

How to Use Facebook Audience Overlap to Improve Your Facebook Marketing

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Want to learn more about the people who make up your Facebook custom audiences? Have you tried Facebook's Audience Overlap? Using Audience Overlap will let you compare your custom audiences against each other, revealing information that will help you make better decisions on where to focus ad targeting and conversion efforts. In this article you'll discover how to use Facebook Audience Overlap to improve your Facebook marketing. Listen to this article: What Is Audience Overlap? Audience Overlap is a Facebook Ads tool that allows you to compare up to five different audiences at once and see the percentage of people who overlap among those audiences. You can access Audience Overlap in the Audiences section of either the Ads Manager or Power Editor. Within the Audiences section, you can see all of the audiences you've created from custom audiences, lookalike audiences, or saved audiences. There are a few differences among these audiences. Custom audiences can be made up of website visitors, certain subsets of your website visitors, a list of email subscribers, or people who have done something specific with your app. Lookalike audiences are similar groups of people you create from another audience, which you use in targeting. Saved audiences are any sets of targeting you save. One limitation to Audience Overlap is that the audiences you compare need to have at least 1,000 people in them to protect people's privacy. How to Use Audience Overlap Audience Overlap is easy to use. Select the check boxes of the audiences you want to compare and then choose Show Audiences Overlap from the Actions drop-down menu. Whichever audience you select first will be the "main" audience for comparison. To change the main audience, click the arrow button in the upper-right corner of the pop-up box and select one of the other audiences. Here are five ways to use Audience Overlap to analyze your community. #1: Compare Website Visitors With Your Email List It's useful to know how many of your website visitors are already email subscribers. Compare your email subscribers audience to your total web traffic audience, as well as other audiences you've created (such as last week's traffic). This will help you know if you need to work on getting more of your email subscribers to visit your site and if you want to focus on getting more of your website traffic onto your email list. Keep in mind that these results aren't exact. When you upload a custom audience of your email subscribers, they won't all match up because your subscribers' email addresses have to be the same login they use for Facebook. I find that somewhere between 50% and 75% of the list typically matches. #2: See How Many Facebook Fans Visit Your Website Do an Audience Overlap comparison to find out whether your Facebook fans are going to your website. If the overlap is low, it could mean you're not promoting your own content enough. If the posts directing people to your website are not doing the trick, you may need to increase your ad budget so they get in front of your fans more often. #3: Find Out Whether Lookalike Audiences Match Your Current Audience Sometimes lookalike audiences don't perform well when you use them in ads. You can check to see how much these audiences have in common with your current audience or other saved audiences that perform well. Remember, you don't want these audiences to have a lot of overlap or you won't be reaching anyone new. However, if they have little or nothing in common, it could be an indication of a mismatch. #4: Analyze the Overlap of Two Audiences Another good way to use Audience Overlap is to compare two sets of targeting to make sure there isn't too much overlap. If you run ads for similar groups at the same time, you're essentially bidding against yourself. You may not need to use both audiences in your targeting. At the very least,

Understanding Code Deployments, for Ecommerce

by Eric Davis @ Practical Ecommerce

“Code complete” is a common saying among software developers when they have finished a development project. But code complete doesn’t mean everything is done. Once developers have written code for a ...

April’s Biggest SEO News, SEM Updates, and Social Media Buzz

by Pure Visibility @ Pure Visibility

Ever feel like you can’t keep up with Facebook’s newest analytics tools and features? Worried about discovering a new Google algorithm after it’s too late? We’re here to help. Every month, the ever-dynamic field of digital marketing experiences shake-ups. We track and...

The post April’s Biggest SEO News, SEM Updates, and Social Media Buzz appeared first on Pure Visibility.

Getting Attention: The Science of Being Captivating Online

Getting Attention: The Science of Being Captivating Online

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you want to bring more attention to your business or product? Want to find out what inspires people to take notice? To discover how to get people's attention online, I interview Ben Parr. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode I interview Ben Parr, the former co-editor for Mashable. He's also the co-founder of DominateFund—invest in great companies. His new book is called Captivology: The Science of Capturing People's Attention. Ben will explore the science of getting attention. You'll discover the different types of attention, as well as some of the triggers. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. How to subscribe on iPhone. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Getting Attention Ben's backstory Ben talks about how his personal blog led to writing for Mashable in 2008. Some of the stories on Ben's blog hit Digg, which was big at the time. Mashable noticed and asked Ben to write for them. He then came on board as a junior editor, and was promoted to co-editor in 2009, which was when he moved to San Francisco. Ben was with Mashable for 3 1/2 years. As co-editor, Ben was in charge of the West Coast. Since he was the only one in Silicon Valley for a long time, if anything came up in Silicon Valley (like they needed someone to talk to Mark Zuckerberg), they called on Ben. He wrote about 2,400 articles and also helped manage and mentor a lot of reporters and junior editors. Ben's book, Captivology, came about a couple of years ago. When Ben was just starting out investing in companies, he realized they were all asking for help with press and marketing, customer and user acquisition, and virality. He explains that all of these areas are about getting attention for products and getting users. Ben says he did a lot of research, and realized there was a lot of interesting information about attention over the last 50 years, but no one had put it together into something mainstream. Listen to the show to discover why Captivology was the book he had to write. The science behind the book For Captivology, Ben went through more than 1,000 different research studies and interviewed dozens of PhDs, as well as business leaders and thought leaders, like Sheryl Sandberg, Steven Soderbergh and David Copperfield. They helped him frame the book in a way that there's a lot of science and research, but also practical information. There's knowledge people can use in daily life. Going into the book, Ben had theories about things like reward systems, and confirmed some of his beliefs on how they work. For example, there's a type of reward-giving, called post-action rewards. This is when someone gets a reward as a surprise after completing an action. When you surprise people with a reward, it reinforces behavior. Listen to the show to discover why incentives are the worst ways to get attention. The three types of attention In Ben's research, he discovered three stages of attention: immediate, short and long attention. Immediate attention. This is the immediate and automatic reaction people have to certain sights, sounds and stimuli. When people hear a gunshot they duck, which is an automatic reaction to protect themselves. There's a lot of fascinating science on how that works and why it matters, Ben says. Short attention. Short attention is the second stage. That's when people start consciously focusing on something. When someone starts watching a show or reading a story about something, that's short attention. Long attention. A lot of people don't think about the third stage, which is long attention (long-term interest in a subject).

Blogger Outreach: How to Build Relationships With Bloggers

Blogger Outreach: How to Build Relationships With Bloggers

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you want to attract more attention to your business? Are you wondering how you can build relationships with the influencers in your market? To learn why it's important to reach out to bloggers, I interview Scott Monty for this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is a show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. The show format is on-demand talk radio (also known as podcasting). In this episode, I interview Scott Monty, the former head of social media for Ford Motor Company. He blogs at ScottMonty.com and his podcast is I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere. Scott shares how to build relationships with bloggers to raise your visibility. You'll discover the types of influencers you need to reach out to and how to engage them in a positive and productive way. Share your feedback, read the show notes and get the links mentioned in this episode below! Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Blogger Outreach Scott's definition of rented In a recent AdWeek interview where Scott discussed paid, earned and owned media, he referred to rented. He said, "Sites like Twitter, Facebook and YouTube, we don't own those. We are using other people's property." Scott explains the reason for that comment was to address the concern marketers have in the drop in organic reach with their posts on Facebook. The challenge now is you can't ignore Facebook because there are over 1.2 billion people who use it, and you have to find a way to live with it. Scott says the reason why he calls these sites rented is because they are ultimately in control. If you look at Facebook, they can change the algorithm any time they like, and marketers have to suffer the consequences, unless they are willing to pay. You need to look at your owned sites, where you do have control. Scott thinks it's best to centralize your content in a hub, then have digital outposts of rented spaces and good relationships with influencers. Then use paid media around all of that to strategically amplify your earned, owned and rented spots. Listen to the show to find out why it's not just about using paid for promoting your ads. Blogger outreach and why it's important  Scott says that blogger outreach isn't that different from media relations. You need to look at who the influencers with an audience are, and figure out if you can either invite them to special events, give them an experience with your products or let them meet with the executives of your company. Then they can go and tell a story to their audience. Any brand has a story to tell and you have to think of ways you can inspire others to tell your story. Once you have figured out who the main industry influencers and bloggers are in your industry, then you can start to reach out to them. It's important to take note of how they interact with other brands too. You'll discover the parallels and distinctions between public relations and blogger relations, and how to treat each type of influencer differently. When Scott was at Ford, they mixed the bloggers in with journalists. Some of the true journalists weren't happy about that, and didn't give bloggers full credit for what they were able to do. Listen to the show to find out how Scott and his team handled the bloggers and journalists together. The power of bloggers compared to traditional media Scott explains that most bloggers don't have the same reach or potential reach as a traditional journalist. Although there are many bloggers who have been brought under a network approach. For example, if you look at the Gawker family of sites, they each started out as a hobby. Jalopnik for automotive, Gizmodo for tech,

How to Use Facebook Ads to Boost Your Best Content

How to Use Facebook Ads to Boost Your Best Content

by @ Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Do you use Facebook ads? Have you considered creating Facebook ads from your top-performing organic posts? To explore how to identify and boost your best Facebook content, I interview Larry Kim. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Larry Kim, the founder and chief technology officer for WordStream. He's a frequent blogger, pay-per-click expert, and social advertising ninja. Larry explains how to improve the performance of your best content with Facebook advertising. You'll discover how to budget for Facebook ads. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Use Facebook Ads to Boost Your Best Content Larry's Backstory Larry's company, WordStream, does search engine and social media advertising, and Larry believes that it's important for businesses to do both types. For instance, B2B software companies build new features, functions, and solutions that nobody is searching for yet. However, with social ads, these businesses can target people who are likely to buy their software based on demographics, interests, or behaviors. Unlike an individual advertiser who has data about only one business, Larry is able to spot trends and patterns in online advertising because WordStream manages approximately $1 billion of ad spending across Facebook, Bing, and Google and runs thousands of campaigns for different clients. WordStream analyzes all of these campaigns to figure out data such as the typical cost per click and typical engagement rates. Listen to the show to discover the percentage of WordStream's clients using Facebook advertising. How Algorithms Work To understand the algorithms, Larry says it's important to think about the context in which your ad appears. (Our conversation focuses on Facebook, but Larry says the same is true for ads on Twitter and other social media platforms.) When you sponsor or promote a post, you're one of thousands or even millions of companies going after the same audience. Larry explains that the Facebook algorithm is designed to handle that volume in a way that keeps Facebook engaging for users so they come back. To determine which posts to show users and how much to charge the advertiser, Larry believes that the algorithm looks at many different factors, but the main one is engagement (clicks, likes, comments, or shares). A post with low engagement has an engagement rate of 1% to 2%. (Only 1 or 2 people out of 100 engage with the post.) A high-engagement post has a rate of 10% to 15%, and the average is around 2.5% to 3%. Larry emphasizes that Facebook doesn't want users' news feeds filled with ridiculous updates that no one cares about. A company trying to promote garbage content with low engagement rates will be dinged with very few ad impressions. The ad might not even be shown. If the ad does show, the click-through rate will be expensive (a few dollars per click versus a few cents). The reverse is also true. Facebook rewards companies that promote interesting content by showing their ads and charging only pennies per click. Listen to the show to hear Larry's thoughts about how engaging ad content needs to be compared to organic content. Unicorns Because algorithms reward engaging content, Larry believes that the winning advertising strategy is simple: promote your unicorns. These outlier posts do spectacularly well. They get three to five times more traffic than the average post and are among the top 1% to 3% of your most engaging content. For instance, a unicorn post might have a 20% engagement rate,

Small Businesses Struggle to Prove Facebook ROI: New Research

Small Businesses Struggle to Prove Facebook ROI: New Research

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Are you using Facebook to acquire customers for your small business? Do you struggle to measure the return on your social media marketing investment? Despite a lack of concrete proof of sales, small businesses are devoting time and dollars to Facebook marketing. In this article you'll discover findings from recent studies focused on Facebook marketing. Listen to this article: #1: Most Small Businesses Don't See a Return From Their Social Media Efforts In April 2015, small business directory Manta surveyed 540 small business owners for their insights on social media return on investment (ROI). Fifty-nine percent report that they did not see ROI from their social media activities. Because the vast majority of small businesses puts most, if not the entire, social media budget into Facebook, this article focuses on that channel. Of the remaining 41% reporting that they did see returns, 17% received less than $100, and 57% received less than $1,000 for their energy and budget. One-third of that 41% (63 individuals) report outearning their social media marketing spend by more than $2,000. Social Media Examiner's 2015 Social Media Marketing Industry Report findings echo those in the Manta study. When the team asked 3,720 marketers whether their Facebook marketing is effective (which we can interpret as driving return to some extent), only 45% reported that it is. (Read here about how 60% of the respondents for the report were small business owners or executives. They either worked in companies with 2 to 10 employees or self-identified as solopreneurs.) The report also reveals that just 33% of the self-employed described Facebook marketing efforts as effective. Larger businesses have a slightly higher regard for their Facebook marketing efforts, with 50% pleased with their Facebook returns. B2C marketers also have a more positive take than B2B, with 51% of B2C marketers finding Facebook effective, compared to just 36% of B2B respondents. Key Takeaways: The significant 35% of respondents who are uncertain about whether their Facebook presence helps their business is telling. With barely enough time to keep up their Facebook page, small businesses typically lack the time and resources to gather the data needed to determine whether their Facebook efforts work. Gathering data requires that either the business owner or staff member learns or understands Google Analytics and Facebook Insights. Both of these tools require time and effort. Further, as Facebook's former Global Head of SMB Marketing Chris Luo explains in his March 2015 Fast Company article, effective Facebook advertising is moving away from the simple updates and boosting that small businesses could master easily: "Facebook has also introduced new, more sophisticated, advertising tools to directly target any user on Facebook in their newsfeed, but for the most part, these tools are used by savvy direct marketers at mid-sized or larger companies and not small businesses." #2: Small Businesses Are Reluctant to Invest Money in Social Media Small business owners are indicating their suspicion of social media marketing with their dollars. The Manta study mentioned above found that 47% of respondents invest less than $100 per month, and 40% spend between $100 and $1,000 monthly. Low spending numbers like these are surprising, given the hype Facebook marketing receives in the media. In a seeming contradiction, a recent poll of 547 small- and medium-sized business owners conducted by BIA/Kelsey and reported in The Wall Street Journal claims that social media marketing gets the majority of small businesses' ad budgets at 21.4% of total dollars. Further investigation, however, reveals that small businesses don't spend very much on marketing at all. A January 2015 BrightLocal survey of 736 small businesses revealed that 70% spend $500 or less per month on marketing. Fifty percent spend less than $300 per month.

How to Successfully Target a Niche Facebook Audience

How to Successfully Target a Niche Facebook Audience

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Do you want to reach new audiences on Facebook? Have you considered targeting niche audiences? Targeting niche groups of people on Facebook, in addition to your primary audience, will help you create new channels of traffic and revenue. In this article, you'll discover how to find and reach niche audiences on Facebook. Listen to this article: Uncover Your Niche Audience Sometimes, all it takes is a little brainstorming to yield an immediate option for a secondary audience. Think of your product or service as if you initially created it for people other than your primary audience to identify new shades of its features that will interest additional customer segments. For example if Dollar Shave Club's primary audience is men who use razors, it's easy to see how they would choose women who use razors as a great secondary target. Alternatively, you can go deep into Facebook's Audience Insights to learn more about your primary audience's quirks. Use any shared similarities you find to identify secondary groups of people who might qualify as a viable audience for you. Target Your Niche Audience When you've decided which audience group you want to target on Facebook, you can take advantage of Audience Optimization to ensure your post will be seen by users who are most likely to engage with it. Now that you know how to find and reach your niche audience, here are three tips to help you make the most of that exposure and visibility. #1: Speak Their Language Many niche groups use specific words, slang, or non-typical word expressions that differentiate them from others. Whether you're trying to connect with introverts, hipsters, or healthy lifestyle fans, it's important to speak the same language they do. To examine the specific language of a group, you can use Google to query phrases such as 'hipster slang.' A large gym that wants to attract a niche audience of CrossFit enthusiasts can search Google for slang that audience might use. You can also use Online Slang Dictionary or Urban Dictionary to learn the meaning of words that are unfamiliar to you. Make a list of the words used by the group you want to target and use them to construct Facebook posts that reflect a particular mood and style that will appeal to the social group you're targeting. After you publish your posts, you can increase the rate of engagement and conversion by responding to comments and questions with the same words your visitors use. #2: Reinforce Their Mood and Interests Posting pictures and quotes that appeal to the unique mindset of your niche audience can be especially effective because they're attractive and shareable. To mitigate the risk of alienating your primary audience with this tactic, make sure the images and quotes you use are relevant to your existing audience as well. Otherwise, you may not get any engagement at all. For example, this post by Nike could easily attract the notice of people interested in philology but stays faithful to the interests of their primary audience of athletes and healthy lifestyle fans. Even if you don't directly address a Facebook post to a specific niche audience, you can appeal to their interests indirectly. For example, this Walt Disney World post is equally interesting for three distinct and possibly overlapping audiences: those who are interested in Disney, in Star Wars or in food. You can take this a step further by including a question that helps your niche audience understand their opinion is important to you, thereby increasing your chances of engaging members of that audience in a conversation. #3: Support Their Social Stance If your business openly aligns with a niche audience on an issue or controversial subject, you can publish posts that make a clear statement to signify your support. For example, this post could be shared to appeal to and attract people who are interested in and support strong female role m...

Top Brands Rediscovering YouTube: New Research

Top Brands Rediscovering YouTube: New Research

by @ The Social Media Examiner Show

Is video part of your marketing mix? Wondering if YouTube is still relevant? In the past year YouTube has enjoyed a sudden surge of interest from both advertisers and young consumers, largely fueled by mobile-device use. In this article you'll discover recent findings on how brands, consumers and marketers are using YouTube today. Listen to this article: #1: YouTube Video-Viewing Time Is Surging A spring 2015 study from comScore and UBS (as reported in eMarketer) found that U.S. consumers increased their video-viewing time on YouTube by 17% over 2014. For a platform that's 10 years old, that's quite a leap. The chart below shows that the biggest year-over-year gain came from mobile users, who increased time spent on YouTube's app by 31%. With desktop-viewing hours declining 30% in 2014 and 9% in 2015, clearly YouTube captured the mobile opportunity. Google's own numbers also indicate a surge even greater than what was noted in the comScore/UBS report. In the search giant's Q2 July 2015 earnings call, CFO Ruth Porat reported that consumer watch time on YouTube had risen 60% from July 2014. That's the fastest growth YouTube has experienced in two years. Porat also shared that mobile watch time alone had doubled. In the above chart Facebook's video usage increase of 852% in 2014 may impress, but remember that it started from almost nothing, so the multiple will be large. The bottom line remains that total time spent viewing video via YouTube amounts to 34 billion hours in 2015. On the other hand, time spent consuming video via Facebook (at 14.3 billion hours) is less than half of YouTube's amount. Still, viewing video on Facebook only began rising in fall 2014, and there could be far greater upside as more consumers pick up the habit of viewing video via Facebook. The article Facebook to Overtake YouTube: Five New Research Findings covers how in a 2014 survey of 180,000 videos across 20,000 Facebook pages, Socialbakers found that direct video uploads to Facebook were increasing rapidly. More content going up means more viewing time will result. Key Takeaway: Because the biggest leap in viewer time spent on YouTube is from mobile devices, you have to credit the user-centric upgrades that YouTube made to its mobile app over the last two years. The authors of the eMarketer study YouTube Advertising: Why Google's Platform Will Stay on Top explain that the new mobile app redesign delivers only the most relevant and personalized content. Further, YouTube instituted TrueView ads that allow users to skip ads at the beginning of videos within seconds. With the power to skip away from the ads, users feel more in control of the experience. #2: Ad Revenue Is Expected to Keep Rising With viewers rediscovering YouTube as a worthwhile channel to spend time on, it only makes sense that advertisers have followed them there. A Look at the Numbers The YouTube ad